9780131424739

Pavement Analysis and Design

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780131424739

  • ISBN10:

    0131424734

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 8/8/2003
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

This up-to-date book covers both theoretical and practical aspects of pavement analysis and design. It includes some of the latest developments in the field, and some very useful computer softwaredeveloped by the authorwith detailed instructions.Specific chapter topics include stresses and strains in flexible pavements, stresses and deflections in rigid pavements, traffic loading and volume, material characterization, drainage design, pavement performance, reliability, flexible pavement design, rigid pavement design, design of overlays, theory of viscoelasticity, theory of elastic layer systems, Superpave, pavement management systems, and an introduction to the 2002 Pavement Design Guide.For practicing engineers in the design of pavements and raft foundations.

Table of Contents

Preface to Second Edition ix
Preface to First Edition xi
CHAPTER 1 Introduction 1(44)
1.1 Historical Developments
1(7)
1.2 Pavement Types
8(11)
1.3 Road Tests
19(7)
1.4 Design Factors
26(11)
1.5 Highway Pavements, Airport Pavements, and Railroad Trackbeds
37(4)
Summary
41(2)
Problems and Questions
43(2)
CHAPTER 2 Stresses and Strains in Flexible Pavements 45(49)
2.1 Homogeneous Mass
45(12)
2.2 Layered Systems
57(19)
2.3 Viscoelastic Solutions
76(13)
Summary
89(1)
Problems
90(4)
CHAPTER 3 KENLAYER Computer Program 94(47)
3.1 Theoretical Developments
94(12)
3.2 Program Description
106(3)
3.3 Comparison with Available Solutions
109(21)
3.4 Sensitivity Analysis
130(11)
Summary
141(2)
Problems
143
CHAPTER 4 Stresses and Deflections in Rigid Pavements 141(45)
4.1 Stresses Due to Curling
147(6)
4.2 Stresses and Deflections Due to Loading
153(11)
4.3 Stresses Due to Friction
164(7)
4.4 Design of Dowels and Joints
171(9)
Summary
180(2)
Problems
182(4)
CHAPTER 5 KENSLABS Computer Program 186(58)
5.1 Theoretical Developments
186(20)
5.2 Program Description
206(7)
5.3 Comparison with Available Solutions
213(13)
5.4 Sensitivity Analysis
226(8)
Summary
234(2)
Problems
236(8)
CHAPTER 6 Traffic Loading and Volume 244(35)
6.1 Design Procedures
244(1)
6.2 Equivalent Single-Wheel Load
245(11)
6.3 Equivalent Axle Load Factor
256(9)
6.4 Traffic Analysis
265(10)
Summary
275(1)
Problems
276(3)
CHAPTER 7 Material Characterization 279(55)
7.1 Resilient Modulus
279(18)
7.2 Dynamic Modulus of Bituminous Mixtures
297(12)
7.3 Fatigue Characteristics
309(7)
7.4 Permanent Deformation Parameters
316(10)
7.5 Other Properties
326(4)
Summary
330(1)
Problems
331(3)
CHAPTER 8 Drainage Design 334(34)
8.1 General Consideration
334(6)
8.2 Drainage Materials
340(11)
8.3 Design Procedures
351(14)
Summary
365(1)
Problems
366(2)
CHAPTER 9 Pavement Performance 368(73)
9.1 Distress
368(20)
9.2 Serviceability
388(13)
9.3 Surface Friction
401(9)
9.4 Nondestructive Deflection Testing
410(14)
9.5 Pavement Performance
424(12)
Summary
436(2)
Problems
438(3)
CHAPTER 10 Reliability 441(31)
10.1 Statistical Concepts
441(10)
10.2 Probabilistic Methods
451(9)
10.3 Variability
460(6)
10.4 Rosenblueth Method
466(3)
Summary
469(1)
Problems
470(2)
CHAPTER 11 Flexible Pavement Design 472(61)
11.1 Calibrated Mechanistic Design Procedure
472(15)
11.2 Asphalt Institute Method
487(18)
11.3 AASHTO Method
505(17)
11.4 Design of Flexible Pavement Shoulders
522(6)
Summary
528(2)
Problems
530(3)
CHAPTER 12 Rigid Pavement Design 533(67)
12.1 Calibrated Mechanistic Design Procedure
533(12)
12.2 Portland Cement Association Method
545(23)
12.3 AASHTO Method
568(15)
12.4 Continuous Reinforced Concrete Pavements
583(9)
12.5 Design of Rigid Pavement Shoulders
592(4)
Summary
596(2)
Problems
598(2)
CHAPTER 13 Design of Overlays 600(55)
13.1 Types of Overlays
600(5)
13.2 Design Methodologies
605(3)
13.3 Asphalt Institute Method
608(12)
13.4 Portland Cement Association Method
620(7)
13.5 AASHTO Method
627(23)
Summary
650(2)
Problems
652(3)
APPENDIX A Theory of Viscoelasticity 655(16)
A.1 Differential Operators
655(2)
A.2 Elastic-Viscoelastic Correspondence Principle
657(5)
A.3 Method of Successive Residuals
662(4)
A.4 Complex Modulus
666(5)
APPENDIX B Theory of Elastic Layer Systems 671(6)
B.1 Differential Equations
671(2)
B.2 Circular Loaded Area
673(1)
B.3 Boundary and Continuity Conditions
674(2)
B.4 Extension to Concentrated Load
676(1)
APPENDIX C KENPAVE Software 677(5)
C.1 Software Installation
677(1)
C.2 Main Screen
678(1)
C.3 LAYERINP
679(2)
C.4 SLABSINP
681(1)
APPENDIX D An Introduction to Superpave 682(12)
D.1 Asphalt Binder Grading System
682(2)
D.2 Aggregates in HMA
684(5)
D.3 Asphalt Mix Design
689(3)
Summary
692(2)
APPENDIX E Pavement Management Systems 694(22)
E.1 PMS Activity Levels
694(1)
E.2 Network-Level Elements
695(5)
E.3 Project-Level Elements
700(3)
E.4 Life-Cycle Cost Analysis
703(8)
E.5 PMS Data and Software
711(2)
E.6 Infrastructure and Asset Management
713(1)
E.7 Pavement Preservation
714(1)
Summary
714(1)
Problems
714(2)
APPENDIX F A Preview of 2002 Design Guide 716(12)
F.1 General Features
716(1)
F.2 Design inputs
717(5)
F.3 Distress Prediction Models
722(5)
Summary
727(1)
APPENDIX G List of Symbols 728(13)
APPENDIX H References 741(20)
Author Index 761(6)
Subject Index 767

Excerpts

The first edition of Pavement Analysis and Designwas published in 1993. The widespread adoption of this book by so many colleges as an undergraduate or graduate text has encouraged me to write this second edition. A major event during the past decade was the completion of the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP), which led to the development of the highly publicized 2002 Pavement Design Guide. However, at the time of this writing, the final draft of the 2002 Guide is still not available. It will likely be a few more years before the Guide is approved and implemented by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). For this reason, only a brief preview of the 2002 Pavement Design Guide is presented, in an appendix. Other than those improvements in the computer programs that necessitate changes in the text, not much is changed in the theoretical part of this book. Although new procedures were developed by SHRP for material characterization and pavement evaluation, these procedures, such as Superpave, are still in the developmental stage and will be subject to change as more experience is gained in their use. In this second edition, Superpave is presented in an appendix. To extend the usefulness of the book, a new appendix on Pavement Management System is added. It is hoped that a more extensive revision will be made in the third edition, after the 2002 Pavement Design Guide is fully implemented and all the testing and evaluation procedures are finalized. Major changes made in this edition are the following: The floppy disk containing the four DOS programs is replaced by a CD containing a Windows program called KENPAVE, which combines the original KENLAYER, LAYERINP, KENSLABS, and SLABSINP into a single package, together with the addition of some computer graphics. The software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 and can be run on any computer with Windows 95 or higher. Detailed instructions on the use of KENPAVE can be found in the software program. Section 13.5 on the AASHTO method of overlay design has been totally revised. The 1986 AASHTO Design Guide was used in the first edition. The guide was revised in 1993 with practically no change in the design of new pavements, but the design of overlay was completely rewritten. New developments and information from the literature have been added to keep the book current. A new method based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion has been added in KENLAYER for nonlinear analysis, and new comparisons age made between KENLAYER and the latest Windows version of MICH-PAVE. Three new appendices have been added: Appendix D--An Introduction to Superpave; Appendix E--Pavement Management Systems; and Appendix F--A Preview of 2002 Design Guide. Appendix C is combined with Appendix B; a new Appendix C contains a brief description of KENPAVE. To provide room for the above additions, Sections 3.4.3 (on contained rock asphalt mats) and 10.5 (on probabilistic computer programs) have been deleted. Also deleted from the appendices are the description of the input programs and the programming details of KENLAYER and KENSLABS, such as subroutines and flowcharts. The description of input and output parameters in Chapters 3 and 5 and the illustrative examples in the appendices also have been removed, because they can now be found in the software program. I wish to acknowledge gratefully the contribution of my colleague, Dr. Kamyar C. Mahboub, who wrote the appendices on Superpave and Pavement Management Systems. These new additions broaden the scope of this book and make it more suitable for a wider audience. I also want to offer my heartfelt thanks to AASHTO, the Transportation Research Board, the Federal Highway Administration, the Asphalt Institute, the Portland Cement Associations, and many others who have permitted the use of the information they developed. Finally, I would like to thank my wife Jane for her support in the use of our retirement time on this book. YANG H. HUANG, Sc. D., P E. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering University of Kentucky

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