CART

(0) items

Perspectives on Argument

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780205060337

ISBN10:
0205060331
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/20/2011
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $103.40

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$17.06

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780205060337
$31.56

Buy New Textbook

Currently Available, Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
N9780205060337
$99.23

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $14.51
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 7/20/2011.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • MyCompLab with Pearson eText -- Standalone Access Card -- for Pespectives on Argument
    MyCompLab with Pearson eText -- Standalone Access Card -- for Pespectives on Argument
  • Perspectives on Argument
    Perspectives on Argument
  • Perspectives on Argument
    Perspectives on Argument
  • Perspectives on Argument
    Perspectives on Argument
  • Perspectives on Argument
    Perspectives on Argument
  • Perspectives on Argument
    Perspectives on Argument
  • Perspectives on Argument Plus MyWritingLab -- Access Card Package
    Perspectives on Argument Plus MyWritingLab -- Access Card Package
  • Perspectives on Argument Plus MyWritingLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
    Perspectives on Argument Plus MyWritingLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
  • Perspectives on Argument Plus MyWritingLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
    Perspectives on Argument Plus MyWritingLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
  • Perspectives on Argument with APA Guidelines
    Perspectives on Argument with APA Guidelines
  • Perspectives on Argument with NEW MyCompLab -- Access Card Package
    Perspectives on Argument with NEW MyCompLab -- Access Card Package




Summary

This combination rhetoric/reader helps readers develop strategies for critical reading, critical thinking, research, and writing that will help the reader argue clearly and convincingly. It teaches them to identify and develop arguments, to read and form reactions and opinions of their own, to analyze an audience, to seek common ground, and to use a wide, realistic range of techniques to write argument papers that express their individual views and original perspectives on modern issues.

Table of Contents

Contents

Alternate Table of Contents 

Preface 

 

Part I: Engaging with Argument for Reading, Writing, and Viewing Images

 

Chapter 1: A Perspective on Argument  

            What Is Your Current Perspective on Argument? 

            A Definition of Argument

            Recognizing Traditional and Consensual Argument 

            Recognizing Visual Argument 

            Under What Conditions Does Argument Work Best?

            Under What Conditions Does Argument Fail? 

            Distinguish Between Ethical and Unethical Argument 

            Recognizing Argument in the 21st Century

            How Should You Engage with Issues?

            Review Questions     

            Exercises and Activities 

                Essays for Analysis

                *Felix Carroll, “No escape from 'helicopter parents”

                Abby Ellin, “The Laptop Ate My Attention Span”

                Prisna Virasin, “The Barbie Controversy”

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1. Blessed Art Thou 

                Image 2. The Tide Is High 

         

Chapter 2: The Rhetorical Situation: Understanding Audience and Context

            Analyze the Rhetorical Situation When You Read an Argument 

            Analyze the Rhetorical Situation When You View a Visual Argument 

            Analyze the Rhetorical Situation When You Encounter an Argument Online

            Use the Rhetorical Situation When You Write an Argument 

            Conducting an Audience Analysis 

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                Essays for Analysis

                Chris Piper, “‘A’ Is for “Absent” 

                *Will Harrel, “A Defense of Grade Deflation”

                *Library of Congress, “The Civil Rights Era”  

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1. Rosa Parks Rides in the Front of the Bus 

                Image 2. Auschwitz Victims of Medical Experiments 

                Image 3. Camp Officials at Leisure 

                Worksheet 1: Rhetorical Situation

 

Chapter 3: Reading, Thinking, and Writing about Issues

            Getting Started on a Writing Assignment 

            Read to Develop Arguments for Your Paper 

            Take Notes and Avoid Plagiarism 

            Write Your Paper, Read It, Think About It, and Revise It 

            Practice Your Process by Writing These Papers 

            Submit Your Paper for Peer Review 

            Expressing Multiple Perspectives Through Visual Argument 

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                Essays for Analysis

                Jerry Adler, “The Race for Survival”

                Gina Kolata, “Psst! Ask for Donor 1913”

                *Randy Cohen, “When Texting Is Wrong”

                Prisna Virasin, “The Controversy Behind Barbie”

                *Congressional Research Service, “Flag Protection: A History of Recent Supreme Court Decisions” 

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1. Sperm Donors

                Image 2. Three Perspectives on the American Flag as a Symbol

                Worksheet 2: Explanatory Paper

 

Part II: Understanding the Nature of Argument for Reading, Writing, and Viewing Images

 

Chapter 4: The Essential Parts of an Argument: The Toulmin Model

            The Outcomes of Argument: Probability versus Certainty 

            The Parts of an Argument According to the Toulmin Model 

            Value of the Toulmin Model for Reading, Writing, and Viewing Argument

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1. Sense of Community, Advertisement

                Image 2. “The Price of Oranges” Cartoon 

            Essays for Analysis

                 Virginia Heffernan, “Calling Blue: And on That Farm He Had a Cellphone”

                 Mohamed T. Diaby, Jr., “Toulmin Analysis of ‘The Price of Oranges’”

                 Richard D. Rieke and Malcolm O. Sillars, “American Value Systems”

 

Chapter 5: Types of Claims

            Five Types of Claims

            Value of the Claim Types and the Claim Questions for Reading, Viewing, and Writing Argument

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                Essays for Analysis

                Haya El Nasser, “Fewer Call Themselves Multiracial”

                Editorial, “Brother, Can You Spare A Word?”

                *Jeffrey Young, “High Tech Cheating Abounds, and Professors Are Partly to Blame”

                Mortimer B. Zuckerman, “What Sets Us Apart”

                *Rebecca Cho, “Is Bottled Water a Moral Issue?”

                Michael Crichton, “Let’s Stop Scaring Ourselves”

                Jim Holt, “Unintelligent Design”

                Barry Schwartz, “When It’s All Too Much”

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1: War Casualties

                Image 2: Lunch at the United States — Mexico Border Fence

                Image 3: The Rhône Glacier 

                Image 4: Liberate Your Cool

                Image 5: Corn Power

 

Chapter 6: Types of Proof

            The Traditional Categories of Proof

            Types of Logical Proof: Logos

            Proof That Builds Credibility: Ethos

            Types of Emotional Proof: Pathos

            Logos, Ethos, and Pathos Communicated Through Language and Style 

            Value of the Proofs for Reading, Viewing, and Writing Argument

            Review Questions

            Exercises and Activities 

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1: Meet the Philip Morris Generation, Advertisement 

                Image 2: Helping Out 

                Image 3: Who Has the Money? Chart 

                *Image 4: Inner City Housing

                *Image 5: Little Girl on Bed in Rundown Bedroom

                Essays for Analysis

                Anna Quindlen, “Undocumented, Indispensable”

                *Government Accountability Office, “Poverty in America: Consequences for Individuals and the Economy” 

                 Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence

 

Chapter 7: The Fallacies and Ethical Argument

            Fallacies in Logic

            Fallacies that Affect Character or Ethos

            Emotional Fallacies

            Ethics and Morality in Argument

            Review Questions

            Exercises and Activities

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1: A Vitamin Ad

                Image 2:  A Body Spray Ad

                Image 3: An Ad for a Blog

                Image 4: President Lincoln Among the Crowd at Gettysburg

                Image 5: The Soldier’s National Monument that Stands in the Center of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

                Essays for Analysis

                Kelly Dickerson, “Minor Problems?”

                Rush Limbaugh, “The Latest from the Feminist ‘Front’”

                The Gettysburg Address

 

Chapter 8: Visual Argument

            Recognizing Visual Argument 

            Why Visual Argument Is Convincing: Eight Special Features 

            Recognizing the Visual in Online Argument

            Using Argument Theory to Critique Visual Argument 

            Bias in Visual Argument 

            Sample Analysis of a Visual Argument 

            Add Visual Argument to Support Written Argument 

            Create Visual Arguments That Stand Alone 

            Arguing Like a Citizen

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                Images for Analysis

                Image 1. West Bank Barrier 

                Image 2. Crossing Over 

                Image 3. Coming Home to a Destroyed Neighborhood 

                Image 4. LeBron James 

                Image 5 At Home Outdoors 

                Multiple Visual Perspectives on an Issue for Analysis

                Image 1. Adam and God 

                Image 2. Play Ball 

                Image 3. Robot with a Grappler 

                Image 4. Missionary and Child 

                Cartoon: ”Get Out!” for Analysis 

                Visual Arguments Created by Students

                Student Visual Argument 1. Untitled Collage 

                Student Visual Argument 2. Never Again 

                Analytical Essay on Never Again 

                Student Visual Argument 3. Farm Town News 

                Analytical Essay on Farm Town News 

                Worksheet 3: Visual Argument Development

 

Chapter 9: Rogerian Argument and Common Ground

            Achieving Common Ground in Rogerian Argument 

            Rogerian Argument as Strategy 

            Rogerian Argument Online

            Writing Rogerian Argument 

            Rogerian Argument in Academic Writing

            Using Rogerian Principles to Argue Like a Citizen

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                 Essays for Analysis

                 Edward O. Wilson, “The Future of Life”

                 Angela A. Boatwright, “Human Cloning: Is It a Viable Option?”

                 Eric Hartman, “Let Those Who Ride Decide!”

                 Elizabeth Nabhan, “Dear Boss”

                 Images for Analysis

                 Image 1. Hands Across the World 

                 Image 2. Bridging the Gap 

                 Image 3. Bipartisanship and What It Can Achieve 

 

Chapter 10: Review and Synthesis of the Strategies for Reading, Writing, and Viewing Argument

            Reading for the Argument Analysis Paper 

            Writing the Argument Analysis Paper 

                Rhetorical Situation for “A Call to Unity: A Letter from Eight White Clergymen” and “Letter from Birmingham Jail” 

            Focus Topics to Help You Analyze the Letters 

            Letters for Analysis

                 “A Call for Unity: A Letter from Eight White Clergymen”

                 Martin Luther King Jr., “Letter from Birmingham Jail”

            Review Questions        

            Exercises and Activities 

 

Part III: Writing a Research Paper That Presents an Argument 

 

Chapter 11: The Research Paper: Planning, Research, and Invention

            Understanding the Assignment and Getting Started

            Writing a Claim and Clarifying Your Purpose 

            Some Preliminary Questions to Help You Narrow and  Develop Your Claim 

            Developing a Research Plan 

            Understanding the Audience 

            Analyzing Your Class as Your Audience 

            Constructing an Unfamiliar Audience 

            Using Information About Your Audience 

            Get Organized for Research

            Locating Sources for Research

            Evaluating Sources

            Create a Bibliography

            Taking and Organizing Your Notes

            Two Invention Strategies to Help You Think Creatively about Your Research and Expand Your Own Ideas

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities

                Worksheet 4: Claim Development

                Worksheet 5: Research Plan

                Worksheet 6: Audience Analysis

            Annotated Bibliography 

                        Student Paper: Angela Boatwright, “Human Cloning: An Annotated Bibliography”

            Add Visual Material to the Annotated Bibliography 

                        Example Image: Welcome Clones of 2012

                Worksheet 7: Research

                Worksheet 8: Research Evaluation

                Worksheet 9: Invention

                Worksheet 10: Proofs and Language Development

 

Chapter 12: The Research Paper: Using Sources, Writing, and Revising

            How to Match Patterns and Support to Claims 

            Outline Your Paper and Cross-Reference Your Notes 

            Incorporating Research into Your First Draft 

            Make Revisions and Prepare the Final Copy 

            Present Your Paper Orally to the Class 

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

 

Appendix to Chapter 12: How to Document Sources Using MLA and APA Styles 

            How to Document Sources Using MLA Style

            MLA: How to Cite Sources in the Body of the Text

            MLA: How to Cite Sources in the Works Cited Page

            Questions on the Researched Position Paper, MLA Style

            MLA Student Paper

                        Prisna Virasin, “The Big Barbie Controversy”

            How to Document Sources Using APA Style

            APA: How to Cite Sources in the References Page

            APA Student Paper

                        Darrell D. Greer, Alaskan Wolf Management

            Questions on the Researched Position Paper, APA Style

 

Part IV: Further Applications: Argument and Literature 

 

Chapter 13: Argument and Literature

            Finding and Analyzing Arguments in Literature

            Writing Arguments About Literature 

            Review Questions 

            Exercises and Activities 

                Literature for Analysis

                Poem: Langston Hughes, “Theme for English B”

                Poem: Taylor Mali, “Totally Like Whatever, You Know?”

                Poem: Robert Frost, “Mending Wall”

                Short Story: Ursula K. LeGuin, “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

                *Graphic Novel: Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale

                 

Part V: The Reader

 

            Introduction

            Purpose of “The Reader”

            How to Use “The Reader”

 

Section 1: Issues Concerning Families and Personal Relationships

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Film and Literature Related to Families and Personal Relationships

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A. What Is the Status of the Traditional American Family? How is the Family Being Redefined?

                        Megan Kelso, “Watergate Sue: Epilogue”

                        *Sarah Yoest Pederson, “A Family of a Different Feather”

                        *Lorraine Ali, “The Curious Lives of Surrogates”

                        *Stacy Morrison, “The Ex-Husband Who Never Left”

                       

            B. What Causes Personal Relationships to Succeed or Fail?                    

                        Steven Pinker, “Crazy Love”

                        *Christine Hassler, “Digital Dating: Desperation or Necessity?”    

                        Reading Images: Movie Madness

                        Anita Jain, “Is Arranged Marriage Really Any Worse Than Craigslist?”

                        Jennifer 8. Lee, “The Man Date”

            Questions to Help You Think and Write About Family and Personal Relationships

 

Section 2: Issues Concerning Modern Technology

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Films and Literature Related to Modern Technology

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A. How Are Web 2.0 Technologies Changing the Way We Live and Our Knowledge of the World?

                        *Nicholas Carr, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”

                        Andrew Keen, “Introduction, The Cult of the Amateur”

                        *Clay Shirky, “Does the Internet Make You Smarter?”

                        Reading Images: Ways of Reading

                        Matthew Kirschenbaum, “How Reading Is Being Reimagined”

 

            B. What Are the Benefits and Dangers of Genetic Engineering for Individuals and for Society?

                        Ray Kurzweil, “Our Bodies, Our Technologies”

                        Peggy Orenstein, “Your Gamete, Myself”

                        *Kathleen Craig, “Making a Living in Second Life”

            Questions to Help You Think and Write about Modern Technology

 

Section 3: Issues Concerning Education and School

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Films and Literature Related to Education and School

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A. How Should Our Current Education System Be Reformed?

                        *John Taylor Gatto, “Take Back Your Education”

                        *Scott Jaschik, “Getting Out of Grading”

                        *Kevin Carey, “College Consumerism Run Amok”

                        *Linda Morgan, “I’m Bored! What Your Child is Really Telling You”

                       

            B. What Role Should Technology Play in Education?

                        *Sarah Perez, “Social Network Profile Costs Woman College Degree”

                        *Mira Jacob, “The Great Baby Einstein Scam”

                        *Zach Miners, “Twitter Goes to College”

                        *Kerry Soper, “Rate My Professor’s Appearance”

            Questions to Help You Think and Write About Education and School

 

Section 4: Issues Concerning Race, Culture, and Identity

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Films and Literature Related to Race, Culture, and Identity

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A.     How Important Is Race to American Identity?

                            Emma Daly, “DNA Test Gives Students Ethnic Shocks”

                            Reading Images: Racial Role Reversal in William Shakespeare’s Othello

                            Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream”

                            K.A. Dilday, “Go Back to Black”

 

            B. To What Extent Does Individual Identity Depend on Ethnic Affiliation?”

                            *Roger Simon, “What Happened to Post-Racial America?

                            Dorinne K. Kondo, “On Being a Conceptual Anomaly”

                            Katie Halper, “Digging For Roots at Secular Camp”

                            Richard Rodriguez, “Surnames Reflect Changing Face of America”

            Questions to Help You Think and Write about Race, Culture, and Identity

 

Section 5: Issues Concerning the Environment

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Film and Literature Related to the Environment

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A.     Is Global Warming a Problem, and If It Is, What Can Be Done about It?

                            Al Gore, “An Inconvenient Truth” Introduction

                            George F. Will, “An Inconvenient Price”

                            Gregg Easterbrook, “Some Convenient Truths”

                            Brian Clark, “The Butterfly Effect and the Environment: How Tiny Actions Can Save the World”            

 

            B.     How Can We Resolve the Economy versus Environment Debate?    

                            Reading Images: Coal Mining and the Environment

                            *Daniel Stone, “Slaves to Industry”

                            Reading Images: The Rain Forest

                            Stuart Price, “Carving Up the Congo”

                            *Lisa Hamilton, “Unconventional Farmers; Let Them Eat Meat”

                            Brian Wingfield, “For Job Market, Green Means Growth”

                            Reading Images: “Near-Zero Energy Home” Advertisement

            Questions to Help You Think and Write about Issues of the Environment

 

Section 6: Issues Concerning Immigration

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Films and Literature Related to Immigration

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A.     How Should We Respond to the Global Problem of Illegal Immigration?

                        Marc Cooper, “Exodus”

                        Peter Wilby, “The Right to Sell Labor”

                        *Angela Maria Kelley, “The Changing Face of Immigration in America”

 

            B.     Do Good Fences Mark Good Neighbors When Defining National Borders?

                        Jonah Goldberg, “To Wall or Not to Wall”

                        *David Aaronovitch, “It’s Not Immigrations We Fear, It’s Change”

                        Reading Images: What Is American?

                        Miguel Bustillo, “Town Against the Wall”

 

            C.     What Is the Relationship between Immigration and Nationality?

                        Arian Campo-Flores, “America’s Divide”

                        Jae Ran Kim, “The Great American Melting Pot?”

                        Lynn Ahrens, “The Great American Melting Pot”

                        Reading Images: American Ideals

                        James Montague, “They Just Won’t Mix”

                Questions to Help You Think and Write about Immigration

 

Section 7: Issues Concerning War and Peace

            The Issues

            Web Sites for Further Exploration and Research

            Films and Literature Related to War and Peace

            The Rhetorical Situation

            A.     Is War Inevitable? How Does War Become Integral to Society?”

                        William James, “The Moral Equivalent of War”

                        Reading Images: War Memorials and Martial Character

                        Margaret Mead, “Warfare: An Invention — Not a Biological Necessity”

                        Reading Images: Seeking Shelter Where He Can Find It

                        *David Goodman, “A Few Good Kids?”

            

            B.     How Do People Justify War?

                        *Noah Charles Pierce, “Iraq War Poems”

                        *Frank Deford, “Sweetness and Light”

                  



Please wait while the item is added to your cart...