9780415224222

The Phenomenology Reader

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780415224222

  • ISBN10:

    0415224225

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 5/31/2002
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

The Phenomenology Readeris the first comprehensive anthology of classic writings from phenomenology's major seminal thinkers. The carefully selected readings chart phenomenology's most famous thinkers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre and Derrida as well as less well known figures such as Stein and Scheler. Each author and their writings is introduced and placed in philosophical context by the editors.

Table of Contents

Preface viii
Acknowledgements ix
Editor's Introduction 1(26)
Dermot Moran
PART I Franz von Brentano: Intentionality and the Project of Descriptive Psychology 27(30)
Introduction
29(3)
Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint: Foreword to the 1874 Edition
32(3)
The Distinction between Mental and Physical Phenomena
35(16)
Descriptive Psychology or Descriptive Phenomenology: From the Lectures of 1888--1889
51(4)
Letter to Anton Marty
55(2)
PART II Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology 57(118)
Introduction
59(6)
Introduction to the Logical Investigations
65(13)
Consciousness as Intentional Experience
78(31)
The Phenomenology of Internal Time Consciousness
109(15)
Pure Phenomenology, its Method, and its Field of Investigation
124(10)
Noesis and Noema
134(17)
The Way into Phenomenological Transcendental Philosophy by Inquiring back from the Pregiven Life-World
151(24)
PART III Adolf Reinach: The Phenomenology of Social Acts 175(22)
Introduction
177(3)
Concerning Phenomenology
180(17)
PART IV Max Scheler: Phenomenology of the Person 197(30)
Introduction
199(4)
The Being of the Person
203(24)
PART V Edith Stein: Phenomenology and the Interpersonal 227(16)
Introduction
229(2)
On the Problem of Empathy
231(12)
PART VI Martin Heidegger: Hermeneutical Phenomenology and Fundamental Ontology 243(66)
Introduction
245(6)
My Way to Phenomenology
251(6)
The Fundamental Discoveries of Phenomenology, its Principle, and the Clarification of its Name
257(21)
The Phenomenological Method of Investigation
278(10)
The Worldhood of the World
288(21)
PART VII Hans-Georg Gadamer: Phenomenology, Hermeneutics and Tradition 309(30)
Introduction
311(3)
Elements of a Theory of Hermeneutic Experience
314(25)
PART VIII Hannah Arendt: Phenomenology of the Public World 339(36)
Introduction
341(4)
What is Existenz Philosophy?
345(17)
Labor, Work, Action
362(13)
PART IX Jean-Paul Sartre: Transcendence and Freedom 375(46)
Introduction
377(5)
Intentionality: A Fundamental Idea of Husserl's Phenomenology
382(3)
The Transcendence of the Ego
385(23)
Bad Faith
408(13)
PART X Maurice Merleau-Ponty: Embodied Perception 421(40)
Introduction
423(4)
The Body as Object and Mechanistic Physiology
427(9)
The Primacy of Perception and its Philosophical Consequences
436(25)
PART XI Simone de Beauvoir: Phenomenology and Feminism 461(48)
Introduction
463(4)
Destiny
467(19)
Woman's Situation and Character
486(23)
PART XII Emmanuel Levinas: The Primacy of the Other 509(32)
Introduction
511(4)
Ethics and the Face
515(14)
Beyond Intentionality
529(12)
PART XIII Jacques Derrida: Phenomenology and Deconstruction 541(32)
Introduction
543(4)
Signs and the Blink of an Eye
547(8)
Differance
555(18)
PART XIV Paul Ricoeur: Phenomenology as Interpretation 573(28)
Introduction
575(4)
Phenomenology and Hermeneutics
579(22)
Name Index 601(3)
Subject Index 604

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