9780872205024

Philosophical Essays and Correspondence

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780872205024

  • ISBN10:

    0872205029

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 3/1/2000
  • Publisher: Hackett Pub Co Inc

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Summary

A superb text for teaching the philosophy of Descartes, this volume includes all his major works in their entirety, important selections from his lesser known writings, and key selections from his philosophical correspondence. The result is an anthology that enables the reader to understand the development of Descartes's thought over his lifetime. Includes a biographical introduction, chronology, bibliography, and index.

Table of Contents

Introduction vii
Descartes: Life and Times vii
Principle of Selection for the Volume xvii
A Bibliographical Note on Descartes's Main Works xx
Selected Bibliography of Primary and Secondary Sources xxii
Acknowledgments xxiii
Brief Chronology of Descartes's Life and Works xxiv
Early Works and Correspondence (to 1637)
1(45)
Preliminaries and Observations (1619)
1(1)
Rules for the Direction of the Mind (1618?-1628?)
2(26)
To Mersenne, On the Eternal Truths (April 15, May 6, and May 27, 1630)
28(2)
The World or Treatise on Light [and Man] (1632)
30(13)
To Mersenne, About Galileo's Condemnation (April 1634)
43(3)
Discourse on Method (1637)
46(37)
Author's Preface
46(1)
Part One
46(4)
Part Two
50(6)
Part Three
56(4)
Part Four
60(4)
Part Five
64(9)
Part Six
73(10)
Correspondence (1637-1641)
83(14)
To Silhon, Existence of God and of the Soul (March 1637)
83(1)
To Plempius for Fromondus, Atomism and Mechanism (October 3, 1637)
84(2)
To Vatier, On the Discourse (February 22, 1638)
86(3)
To Regius, Knowledge of the Infinite (May 24, 1640)
89(1)
To Colvius, On Augustine and the Cogito (November 14, 1640)
90(1)
To Mersenne, Immortality of the Soul (December 24, 1640)
91(3)
To Mersenne, The Aim of the Meditations and the Context for the Principles (December 31, 1640)
94(1)
To Mersenne, On J.-B. Morin's Proof for the Existence of God (January 28, 1641)
95(2)
Meditations on First Philosophy (1641)
97(45)
Letter of Dedication
97(3)
Preface to the Reader
100(2)
Synopsis of the Meditations
102(2)
Meditation One: Concerning Those Things That Can Be Called into Doubt
104(3)
Meditation Two: Concerning the Nature of the Human Mind: That It Is Better Known Than the Body
107(6)
Meditation Three: Concerning God, That He Exists
113(9)
Meditation Four: Concerning the True and the False
122(5)
Meditation Five: Concerning the Essence of Material Things, and Again Concerning God, That He Exists
127(5)
Meditation Six: Concerning the Existence of Material Things, and the Real Distinction between Mind and Body
132(10)
Objections by Some Learned Men to the Preceding Meditations, with Replies by the Author (1641)
142(65)
First Set of Objections
142(7)
Reply by the Author to the First Set of Objections
149(10)
Reply to the Second Set of Objections
159(8)
Third Set of Objections, by a Famous English Philosopher, with the Author's Replies
167(10)
Fourth Set of Objections, by Antoine Arnauld, Doctor of Theology
177(5)
Reply to the Fourth Set of Objections
182(8)
Sixth Set of Objections
190(4)
Reply to the Sixth Set of Objections
194(13)
Correspondence (1641-1644)
207(15)
To Mersenne, Idea Defined and Discussed (July 1641)
207(2)
To Gibieuf, Ideas and Abstraction (January 19, 1642)
209(3)
To Buitendijck, Possibility of Doubting God's Existence (1643)
212(1)
To Elisabeth, Primitive Notions (May 21 and June 28, 1643)
213(3)
To Mesland, On Freedom (May 2, 1644)
216(6)
Principles of Philosophy (1644-1647)
222(51)
Preface
222(9)
The Principles of Human Knowledge
231(22)
The Principles of Material Things
253(9)
The Visible World
262(1)
The Earth
263(10)
Late Works and Correspondence (1645 On)
273(52)
To Mesland, On Freedom (February 9, 1645)
273(1)
To Clerselier, Concerning Principles (June or July 1646)
274(1)
To the Marquis of Newcastle, About Animals (November 23, 1646)
275(2)
To Chanut, On Nicholas Cusa and the Infinite (June 6, 1647)
277(4)
Notes Against a Program (1648)
281(11)
To More, Replies to Objections (February 5, 1649)
292(5)
The Passions of the Soul (1649)
297(18)
The Search After Truth by the Light of Nature (1641?-1649?)
315(10)
Index 325

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