9780415132145

Philosophy of Religion: A Contemporary Introduction

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780415132145

  • ISBN10:

    0415132142

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 1999-01-05
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

Philosophy of Religionprovides an account of the central issues and viewpoints in the philosophy of religion but also shows how such issues can be rationally assessed and in what ways competing views can be rationally assessed. It includes major philosophical figures in religious traditions as well as discussions by important contemporary philosophers. Keith E. Yandell deals lucidly and constructively with representative views from Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Introduction
1(8)
PART I: PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 9(72)
What is philosophy? What is religion? What is philosophy of religion?
11(10)
Philosophy
13(2)
Objectivity
15(1)
Religion
16(1)
Philosophy of religion
17(1)
Questions for reflection
18(1)
Annotated reading
18(3)
What sorts of religion are there?
21(16)
Monotheism
24(4)
Advaita Vedanta
28(2)
Jainism
30(1)
Buddhism
31(1)
Comparison
32(1)
The criteria applied
32(2)
Questions for reflection
34(1)
Annotated reading
35(2)
What sorts of religious experience are there?
37(14)
Structure and content
39(2)
Descriptions
41(5)
Criteria and their application
46(4)
Questions for reflection
50(1)
Annotated reading
50(1)
The importance of doctrine and the distinctness of religious traditions
51(14)
Doctrine
53(3)
``Truth-claims''
56(1)
Identity
57(4)
Diversity
61(3)
Questions for reflection
64(1)
Annotated reading
64(1)
Religious pluralism
65(16)
Religious plurality and religious pluralism
67(1)
The content of religious pluralism
67(1)
Some religion-relevant consequences of RP
68(2)
A critical discussion of RP: Part one
70(4)
A critical discussion of RP: Part two
74(4)
A critical discussion of RP: Part three
78(1)
Questions for reflection
79(1)
Annotated reading
80(1)
PART II: RELIGIOUS CONCEPTIONS OF ULTIMATE REALITY 81(38)
Monotheistic conceptions of ultimate reality
83(16)
Generic philosophical monotheism
85(1)
Greek monotheism
86(3)
Semitic monotheism
89(1)
Hindu monotheism
90(1)
Monotheisms and atheisms
91(5)
Questions for reflection
96(1)
Annotated reading
97(2)
Nonmonotheistic conceptions of ultimate reality
99(20)
Advaita Vedanta Hinduism
102(7)
Jainism and Buddhism
109(7)
Conclusion
116(1)
Questions for reflection
116(1)
Annotated reading
117(2)
PART III: ARGUMENTS CONCERNING MONOTHEISTIC CONCEPTIONS 119(118)
Arguments against monotheism
121(46)
Three questions
123(1)
The problem of evil
124(1)
Failed escapes
125(3)
The consistency issue
128(3)
The evidential issue
131(30)
Conclusion
161(1)
Epilogue
161(3)
Questions for reflection
164(1)
Annotated reading
165(2)
Arguments for monotheism
167(46)
Proof
169(2)
Logical necessity
171(3)
Purely conceptual proofs and the Ontological Argument
174(7)
Empirical proofs, argument strategies, and principles of sufficient reason
181(3)
Arguments by Thomas Aquinas
184(26)
Questions for reflection
210(1)
Annotated reading
211(2)
Monotheism and religious experience
213(24)
Phenomenologically thick experiences
215(1)
Experience as direct evidence
216(2)
A principle of experiential evidence
218(10)
Being evidence versus providing evidence
228(2)
The evidential argument from religious experience
230(1)
The principle of experiential evidence applied
231(4)
Questions for reflection
235(1)
Annotated reading
235(2)
PART IV: ARGUMENTS CONCERNING NONMONOTHEISTIC CONCEPTIONS 237(62)
Arguments concerning nonmonotheistic conceptions (1)
239(26)
Appeals to argument and appeals to experience
241(1)
Advaita Vedanta
242(1)
Jainism and Buddhism on persons
242(2)
Identity
244(2)
Personal identity
246(1)
Bundle theory
246(6)
Copiers and annihilators
252(7)
Substance theory
259(4)
Questions for reflection
263(1)
Annotated reading
264(1)
Arguments concerning nonmonotheistic conceptions (2)
265(34)
Appeals to enlightenment experience
267(4)
Self-authentication
271(14)
Advaita appeal to enlightenment experience
285(1)
Jain-type appeals to experience
286(7)
Buddhist-type appeals to experience
293(2)
The contrasting arguments
295(3)
Questions for reflection
298(1)
Annotated reading
298(1)
PART V: RELIGION, MORALITY, FAITH, AND REASON 299(62)
Religion and morality
301(40)
Religious values and moral values
303(3)
Deterministic views
306(3)
Compatibilism and incompatibilism
309(13)
The Principle of Alternative Possibilities
322(13)
Divine foreknowledge and human freedom
335(3)
Conclusion
338(1)
Questions for reflection
339(1)
Annotated reading
339(2)
Faith and reason
341(20)
Faith
343(1)
Knowledge
343(1)
Scientism
344(2)
Propositions
346(3)
The epistemic status of religious belief
349(1)
Robust foundationalism
350(1)
Confirmationism and falsificationism
351(4)
Ways of being falsified
355(1)
Theistic arguments and explanatory power
356(3)
Questions for reflection
359(1)
Annotated reading
359(2)
Glossary 361(4)
Selected great figures in the history of philosophy of religion 365(2)
Notes 367(28)
Bibliography 395(6)
Index 401

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