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Philosophy and Revolution : From Kant to Marx,9781859846025

Philosophy and Revolution : From Kant to Marx

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ISBN13:

9781859846025

ISBN10:
1859846025
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
3/17/2003
Publisher(s):
Verso
List Price: $65.00
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Summary

Throughout the nineteenth century, German philosophy was haunted by the spectre of the French Revolution. Kant, Hegel, and their followers spent their lives wrestling with its heritage, trying to imagine a specifically German path to modernity: a 'revolution without revolution'. Trapped in a politically frozen society, German intellectuals were driven to brood over the nature of the revolutionary experience.In this ambitious and original study, Stathis Kouvelakis paints a rich panorama of the key intellectual and political figures in the effervescence of German thought before the 1848 revolutions. He shows how the attempt to chart a moderate and reformist path entered into deep crisis, generating two antagonistic perspectives. In one camp, represented by Moses Hess and the early Friedrich Engels, were those socialists who sought to discover a principle of reconciliation and harmony in social relations, by bypassing the question of revolutionary politics. In sharp contrast, the poet Heinrich Heine and the young journalist Karl Marx developed a new perspective articulating revolutionary rupture and struggle for democracy, thereby redefining the very notion of politics.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements ix
Preface xi
Fredric Jameson
Introduction: From Philosophy to Revolution 1(8)
Kant and Hegel, or the Ambiguity of Origins
9(35)
A Foundation for Politics?
12(11)
The impossible compromise
12(4)
Politics between a foundation and the salto mortale
16(3)
The force of events
19(4)
Superseding the Revolution?
23(21)
Is the revolution Kantian?
23(4)
Revolution as a process, revolution as event
27(2)
Short of liberalism, and beyond it
29(9)
A state beyond politics?
38(6)
Spectres of Revolution: On a Few Themes in Heine
44(77)
Flanerie as dialectical exercise
47(6)
The philosophy of history: A clinical description of decomposition
53(29)
The politics of the name
82(6)
Exorcising the spectres
88(11)
The other German Road: revolutionary democracy
99(22)
Moses Hess, Prophet of a New Revolution?
121(46)
`We Europeans. . .'
123(6)
From the `social' to the state
129(6)
Defending the German Road
135(10)
Radicalization or flight to the front
145(13)
The `religion of love and humanity'
158(9)
Friedrich Engels Discovers the Proletariat, 1842--1845
167(65)
The `English Condition': The Ancien Regime plus Capitalism?
172(21)
Germany--England
172(6)
The status of critique: Hegel in Feuerbach
178(7)
The inevitable revolution
185(8)
The Proletariat: `Population' or `Class'?
193(39)
From the `social' to `socialism': The great romance of organization
194(5)
A physiologist in the big city
199(8)
From class struggle to race war (and vice versa)
207(4)
The battlefield
211(6)
Tertium datur?
217(2)
Revolution without a revolution?
219(13)
Karl Marx: From the Public Sphere to Revolutionary Democracy, 1842--1844
232(105)
Fighting for Freedom with Pinpricks
237(38)
The `party of the concept'
237(6)
Non-contemporaneousness in the Rhineland
243(3)
From civil society to the state
246(10)
The system of the free press
256(11)
Volksgeist and revolution
267(8)
The Roads of Exile
275(62)
The ship of fools
275(13)
Hegel beyond Hegel
288(15)
The origins of permanent revolution: `true democracy'
303(12)
The new world
315(9)
The radical revolution
324(5)
The paradoxical protagonist
329(3)
`Nulla salus sine Gallis'
332(5)
Conclusion: Self-Criticisms of the Revolution 337(16)
Notes 353(70)
Index 423


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