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Phonics in Proper Perspective

by
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780130343451

ISBN10:
0130343455
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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  • Phonics In Proper Perspective
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Summary

& The tenth edition of Phonics in Proper Perspective& provides succinct and clear descriptions of how to engage emergent readers in phonics and on to becoming independent readers. & Making the distinction between phonics and the more precise science of phonetics, this book identifies the most simple& and effective ways to teach phonics and explains where phonics fits best in the learning to& read process.& The book& also& highlights * The theme of teacher responsibility and accountability in students& #39; learning is the strength of the project. * Struggling Readers features and activities linked to NCLB topics are pedagogical highlights. * An emphasis on direct instruction.& & Inservice teachers and Reading/Literacy Specialists.

Table of Contents

Phonics: Purpose and Limitations
1(8)
The Study of Phonics
1(4)
Terminology
2(3)
Limitations of Phonics
5(1)
Variability of Letter-Sounds in English
5(4)
Phonics: History and Controversy
9(14)
Early Trends
9(2)
Reality Check: Basal Programs
11(1)
Sight-word Method versus Phonetic Method
12(1)
Criticism Leads to New Phonics Materials
13(1)
The Initial Teaching Alphabet (ITA)
14(3)
The ITA Instructional Program
15(1)
ITA: Postponing the Difficult
15(1)
Transfer from the ITA to Traditional Orthography
16(1)
The Linguistic (Regular Spelling) Approach
17(2)
The Regular Spelling Instructional Program
18(1)
The Individualized Reading and Language Experience Approaches
19(1)
Whole Language
20(3)
Prerequisites for Phonics Instruction
23(18)
Phonological Awareness: The First Prerequisite for Phonics Instruction
23(6)
Phonemic Awareness: The Second Prerequisite for Phonics Instruction
29(1)
Developing Phonemic Awareness
29(7)
Visual Discrimination: The Third Prerequisite for Phonics Instruction
36(4)
Summary
40(1)
Moving Into Reading
41(10)
Contrasting Learning to Speak and Learning to Read
42(1)
Context Clues
42(1)
How Children Learn to Read
43(1)
Introducing Phonics Instruction
44(2)
Consonant Consistency
46(1)
Becoming Independent Readers
46(1)
Structural Clues
47(1)
The Blue-Collar Working Words
47(2)
Summary
49(2)
Consonant Letter-Sound Relationships
51(36)
A Word About Sequence
51(1)
Rationale for Teaching Consonant Sounds First
51(1)
Initial Consonant Letter-Sounds
52(7)
Mental Substitution
55(3)
Context Plus Minimal Phonic Cue
58(1)
Context Clues and Phonic Skills: Working Together
59(4)
Initial Consonant Blends
63(8)
Initial Consonant Digraphs (sh, wh, th, and ch)
71(3)
Steps in Brief
71(1)
Blends in Sentence Context
72(2)
Final Consonants, Blends, and Digraphs
74(5)
Consonant Digraphs ch, sh, and th at the End of Words
77(1)
Consonant Digraphs nk, ng, and ck at the End of Words
78(1)
Final Consonant Blends (st, sk, ld, mp, and nd)
79(1)
Consonant Irregularities
79(6)
The Two Sounds of c (/k/ and /s/)
80(1)
The Two Sounds of g (/g/ and /j/)
80(1)
Sounds Represented by the Letters
81(1)
Consonants Not Sounded
81(3)
Qu and Que Combinations (/kw/ and /k/)
84(1)
Summary
85(2)
Vowel Letter-Sound Relationships
87(30)
Phonics Instruction as Overkill
87(1)
Sequence in Teaching Vowel Letter-Sounds
88(1)
Short Vowel Sounds
89(9)
Using Word Families
90(4)
Minimal Contrast Vowels
94(3)
Combining Teaching of Initial and Medial Vowel Sounds
97(1)
Long Vowel (Glided) Letter-Sounds
98(7)
Using Visual Patterns as Cues to Sounding
98(1)
Teaching Short and Long Sounds Together
99(4)
Two Vowels, One of Which is Final e
103(1)
Single Final Vowels
104(1)
Exceptions to Vowel Rules Previously Taught
105(1)
Two Adjacent Vowels
106(1)
Medial Vowel Plus Final e
106(1)
Vowel Sounds Affected by r
106(1)
a followed by I, II, w, and u
107(1)
The oo Sounds
107(1)
Dipthongs
108(2)
Dipthong Sounds
108(2)
Ow as the Long Sound of o
110(1)
Homonyms
110(4)
The Schwa Sound
114(1)
Sight-word List
114(2)
Summary
116(1)
Structural Analysis Skills
117(30)
Inflectional Endings
118(1)
Adding -s, -ed, and -ing to Words
118(1)
Adding -er, -est, and -ly to Words
118(1)
Adding Suffixes Following y
119(1)
Doubling Final Consonants
119(3)
Compound Words
122(5)
Working with Plurals
127(4)
Adding -s to Form Plurals
127(1)
Plurals Formed by Adding -es
128(1)
Plurals of Words Ending with y
129(1)
Other Plural Forms
129(2)
Prefixes and Suffixes
131(3)
Syllabication
134(4)
Generalizations Relating to Syllabication
135(1)
Affixes as Syllables
136(2)
Abbreviations
138(2)
Recognizing Contractions
140(1)
Finding Little Words in Big Words
141(1)
Accent
142(2)
Shift in Accent
143(1)
Stress on Words Within Sentences
144(1)
Use of the Dictionary as a Word Attack Skill
144(1)
Summary
145(2)
Bibliography 147(2)
Index 149

Excerpts

The purpose of this book is to provide both the experienced and the prospective teacher with materials that will lead to better understanding of the following: The purpose and limitations of phonics instruction as it relates to teaching reading Concrete practices to follow in teaching the various steps in phonics analysis The rationale that underlies particular instructional practices The material in this book reflects several premises: Phonics is an important part of teaching beginning reading. Teachers should be knowledgeable about the purpose of phonics instruction and its limitations. For children to make normal progress in learning to read, they must learn to associate printed letter forms with the speech sounds they represent. Beginning reading instruction must not mislead children into thinking that reading is sounding out letters, or learning sight words, or using context clues. Learning to read involves all these skills in the right combination. The optimum amount of phonics instruction for each child is the absolute minimum the child needs to become an independent reader. Excessive phonics instruction will usurp time that should be devoted to reading, can destroy children's interest in reading, and may lead critics to attack phonics instruction rather than bad phonics instruction. For the ninth edition, I would like to thank the following reviewers who provided valuable comments and suggestions: Martha Cocchiarella, Arizona State University; Wanda Hedrick, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Rosie Webb Joels, The University of Central Florida; Stephanie Steffey, San Jose State University; Karen R. Travis, Southwestern Oklahoma State University; and Bonita F. Williams, Columbus State University.


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