9780199740062

Planet Taco A Global History of Mexican Food

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780199740062

  • ISBN10:

    0199740062

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 10/1/2012
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Summary

Planet Taco asks the question, "what is authentic Mexican food?" The burritos and taco shells that many people think of as Mexican were actually created in the United States, and Americanized foods have recently been carried around the world in tin cans and tourist restaurants. But the contemporary struggle between globalization and national sovereignty to determine the meaning of Mexican food is far from new. In fact, Mexican food was the product of globalization from the very beginning -- the Spanish conquest -- when European and Native American influences blended to forge the mestizo or mixed culture of Mexico. The historic struggle between globalization and the nation continued in the nineteenth century, as Mexicans searching for a national cuisine were torn between nostalgic "Creole" Hispanic dishes of the past and French haute cuisine, the global food of the day. Indigenous foods, by contrast, were considered strictly dclass. Yet another version of Mexican food was created in the U.S. Southwest by Mexican American cooks, including the "Chili Queens" of San Antonio and tamale vendors of Los Angeles. When Mexican American dishes were appropriated by the fast food industry and carried around the world, Mexican elites rediscovered the indigenous roots of their national cuisine among the ancient Aztecs and the Maya. Even this Nueva Cocina Mexicana was a transnational phenomenon, called "New Southwestern" by chefs in the United States. Rivalries within this present-day gourmet movement recalled the nineteenth-century struggles between Creole, Native, and French foods. Planet Taco also seeks to recover the history of people who have been ignored in the struggles to define authentic Mexican, especially those who are marginal to both nations: Indians and Mexican Americans.

Author Biography


Jeffrey M. Pilcher is Professor of History at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of Que vivan los tamales!: Food and the Making of Mexican Identity; The Sausage Rebellion: Public Health, Private Enterprise, and Meat in Mexico City; and Food in World History. He also edited the Oxford Handbook of Food History.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction. A Tale of Two Tacosp. 1
Proto-Tacos
Maize and the Making of Mexicop. 21
Burritos in the Borderlandsp. 46
National Tacos
From the Pastry War to Parisian Molep. 79
The Rise and Fall of the Chili Queensp. 105
, Inventing the Mexican American Tacop. 130
Global Tacos
The First Wave of Global Mexicanp. 163
The Blue Corn Bonanzap. 189
Conclusion. The Battle of the Taco Trucksp. 221
Notesp. 233
Glossaryp. 263
Select Bibliographyp. 268
Indexp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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