9780471976837

Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780471976837

  • ISBN10:

    0471976830

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1999-01-26
  • Publisher: WILEY
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $154.95 Save up to $6.20
  • Buy New
    $148.75
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    PRINT ON DEMAND: 2-4 WEEKS. THIS ITEM CANNOT BE CANCELLED OR RETURNED.

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Second Edition Edited by Peter J. Lea Department of Biological Sciences, Lancaster University, UK and Richard C. Leegood Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK As research in plant metabolism and molecular biology continues to make great progress it has become essential for plant scientists to have an overview of both disciplines, which are becoming increasingly complementary in understanding plant function. Drawing on their own teaching and research experience, the editors and contributors have provided a timely, comprehensive and generously illustrated new edition of this successful introductory textbook. All of the chapters have been updated and revised, and a new chapter on secondary metabolism has been included. Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will be invaluable to undergraduate and postgraduate students in the plant sciences and to all those requiring an introduction to current concepts in molecular plant science. Reviews of the First Edition "The aim of the editors to blend plant biochemistry with molecular biology is successfully reached and provided a new, well written text book which is easy to read." Journal of Plant Physiology "The contributing chapters are well written with clear illustrations and I would expect undergraduates, to whom this book is primarily targeted, to enjoy using it." New Phytologist "The evident teaching experience of the authors make this textbook a useful aid to students and researchers." Photosynthetica What the lecturers said about the First Edition: "A very useful text with a good balance of traditional biochemistry and molecular biology. Its usefulness is enhanced by a very clear and visually pleasing layout and the generally high quality and clarity of the writing." "A surprising amount of information in an easily accessible format." "Good coverage and depth. I'm not aware of any other book that deals with this material so well as this one. It addresses a real need in plant science teaching."

Table of Contents

Abbreviations Used in this Book xi
Bacterial Taxonomy and Nomenclature xix
Introduction xxiii
Part 1 Background to Cellular Microbiology
An Introduction to Cellular Microbiology
3(20)
Introduction
3(3)
A brief history of bacteriology
6(3)
Bacterial diseases
9(3)
Mutualism, commensalism and parasitism
10(1)
How do bacteria cause disease?
10(2)
Bacteria and idiopathic diseases
12(1)
Emergence of the new discipline of cellular microbiology
12(5)
An evolutionary history of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
17(4)
Conclusions
21(2)
The Cellular Biology Underlying Prokaryotic-Eukaryotic Interactions
23(66)
Introduction
23(1)
Bacterial ultrastructure
23(7)
The bacterial cell envelope
24(3)
The periplasm
27(1)
Cell surface appendages
27(1)
Cell surface-associated components
28(1)
The nuclear region
29(1)
Cytoplasm
30(1)
Bacterial gene transcription, operons, movable genetic elements
30(3)
Adapt or perish
30(1)
Gene transcription
30(1)
Induction and repression
31(1)
Mobile genetic elements
31(2)
Pathogenicity islands
33(4)
Bacterial protein secretion systems
37(5)
The general secretory pathway
39(2)
Other secretion pathways
41(1)
The bacterial cell cycle
42(2)
Eukaryotic cell structure
44(2)
Prokaryotes within eukaryotes: mitochondria, peroxisomes and centrioles
46(4)
Mitochondria
46(2)
Peroxisomes
48(1)
Centrioles
49(1)
The plasma membrane
50(3)
The cytoskeleton
53(11)
The composition and nature of the cytoskeleton
53(2)
Intermediate filaments
55(1)
Microtubules
55(2)
The actin cytoskeleton
57(5)
Cell signalling and the actin cytoskeleton
62(1)
Hijacking the actin cytoskeleton
63(1)
Vesicular transport pathways: exocytosis and endocytosis
64(10)
Role of the ER in protein synthesis and sorting
64(4)
Vesicular transport
68(3)
Endocytosis and exocytosis: bacterial involvement
71(3)
Nuclear structure and gene organization
74(5)
Organization and transcription of eukaryotic DNA
75(4)
The cell cycle and apoptosis
79(8)
The cell cycle
81(4)
Apoptosis
85(2)
Conclusions
87(2)
Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Signalling Mechanisms
89(74)
Introduction
89(2)
Eukaryotic cell-to-cell signalling
91(19)
Endocrine hormone signalling
92(1)
Cytokines: early evolved intercellular signals
93(17)
Prokaryotic cell-to-cell signalling: quorum sensing and bacterial pheromones
110(7)
Signals controlling conjugation in Enterococcus faecalis
111(1)
Signals controlling sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus
111(1)
Quorum sensing
112(3)
Formylated peptides in bacterial--eukaryotic signalling
115(2)
Intracellular signalling: an overview
117(43)
A complex signalling system is built using a limited number of basic principles
118(1)
The basic building blocks used in signalling
119(17)
Prokaryotic signalling mechanisms
136(6)
Eukaryotic signalling pathways
142(16)
Outcomes of the activation of signalling pathways
158(2)
Conclusion
160(3)
Molecular Techniques Defining Bacterial Virulence Mechanisms
163(28)
Introduction
163(1)
Molecular techniques defining bacterial virulence
164(18)
Basic molecular biology protocols
164(3)
Mutational analysis
167(4)
Gene transfer
171(1)
Protein expression approaches
171(3)
cDNA approaches
174(1)
In vivo expression technology
175(3)
Gene reporter systems
178(1)
Genome-based approaches
179(3)
Molecular biological techniques applied to eukaryotic cells
182(4)
Yeast two-hybrid or interactive trap cloning in yeast
183(1)
Generation of transgenic animals
183(3)
Conclusions
186(5)
Part 2 Prokaryotic--Eukaryotic Interactions in Infection
Bacterial Adhesion to Host Cells
191(32)
Introduction
191(3)
Basic principles of microbial adhesion
194(9)
Pre-adhesion events
194(1)
Molecular mechanisms of adhesion
195(1)
Bacterial structures involved in adhesion
196(2)
Bacterial adhesins
198(3)
Nature of the host cell surface
201(2)
Effects of adhesion on bacteria
203(3)
Growth
204(1)
Structures involved in adhesion or invasion of host cells
204(2)
Siderophone production
206(1)
Effects of adhesion on host cells
206(14)
Effect on epithelial cells
207(10)
Adhesion to fibroblasts
217(1)
Adhesion to vascular endothelial cells
218(1)
Adhesion to phagocytic cells
219(1)
Conclusions
220(3)
Bacterial Invasion of Host Cells
223(50)
Introduction
223(1)
Invasion mechanisms
224(26)
Invasion of epithelial cells
224(18)
Invasion of endothelial cells
242(5)
Invasion of macrophages
247(3)
Consequences of invasion
250(9)
Effect on host cells
250(6)
Effect on bacteria
256(3)
Bacterial survival and growth subsequent to invasion
259(10)
Intracellular lifestyle
259(8)
Extracellular lifestyle
267(2)
In vitro and in vivo models of tissue invasion
269(2)
Conclusions
271(2)
Bacterial Protein Toxins: Agents of Disease and Probes of Eukaryotic Cell Behaviour
273(38)
Introduction
273(1)
Bacterial toxins: past and present killers
274(1)
History of research
274(2)
Classification of toxins by their activity
276(20)
Toxins that damage membranes
276(7)
Membrane transducing toxins
283(1)
Intracellular toxins
283(12)
Intracellular toxins that gain intracellular access via type III secretion
295(1)
Structure explains function
296(3)
Diphtheria toxin
297(1)
The AB5 toxin structure
298(1)
Aerolysin
299(1)
Biological effects of toxin action
299(4)
Cell death
300(1)
Nerve transmission
300(1)
Signal transduction
300(2)
Bacterial protein toxins and cancer?
302(1)
Interactions with cytokines
303(1)
The bacterial perspective
303(2)
The advantage to the bacterium
303(2)
Origin and evolution of toxin genes
305(1)
Therapeutic uses of toxins
305(4)
Vaccines
305(2)
New uses
307(2)
Summary and the future
309(2)
The Innate Immune Response and Bacterial Infections
311(44)
Introduction
311(2)
How does innate immunity recognize bacteria and bacterial infection?
313(7)
Recognition of lipopolysaccharide
318(1)
Discrimination between different pathogens
319(1)
Bacteria--host interactions at body surfaces
320(8)
Natural `antibiotics' and host defence: a newly recognized system
325(3)
Innate immunity and the acute-phase response
328(8)
Cell populations of the acute-phase response
328(2)
Bacterial killing
330(4)
Antiphagocytic mechanisms of bacteria
334(2)
Complement and antibacterial defence
336(5)
Bacterial defences against complement
340(1)
Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp)
341(1)
Cytokines: the integrators of immunity
342(10)
Cytokines in the control of the innate response to infection
342(2)
Bacterial components and their role in controlling inflammation
344(3)
Modulation of cytokines as an immune evasion mechanism
347(5)
Conclusions
352(3)
Acquired Immunity in the Defence Against Bacteria
355(52)
Introduction
355(1)
A brief description of acquired immunity
356(3)
Cell populations involved in acquired immunity
359(6)
Subpopulations of T lymphocytes
360(3)
Subpopulations of B lymphocytes
363(2)
Generation of diversity: the secret weapon of acquired immunity
365(6)
Generation of antibody synthesis
368(2)
The T cell receptor
370(1)
Antigen presentation and lymphocyte activation
371(7)
B cell activation
371(2)
The T cell: a complex of activation
373(5)
Acquired immunity in antibacterial defence
378(16)
Antigen processing and presentation on MHC class I/class II proteins
379(3)
B cell immunity to bacteria
382(4)
T cell defences against bacteria
386(1)
Viral strategies to combat immune responses
387(5)
Role of specialized B and T cells in antibacterial defence
392(2)
Bacterial products influencing acquired immunity
394(9)
Superantigens
395(3)
Bacterial exotoxins
398(1)
Heat shock proteins (Hsps)
399(4)
Acyl homoserine lactones
403(1)
Conclusions
403(4)
Future Developments in Cellular Microbiology
407(30)
Introduction
407(2)
Prokaryotic/eukaryotic interactions in bacterial growth
409(3)
Effect of bacteria on eukaryotic cell growth and survival
412(8)
Bacterial control of the eukaryotic cell cycle
414(5)
Bacterial control of apoptosis
419(1)
The commensal microflora: an example of close cellular conversation?
420(8)
The commensal paradox
423(1)
A hypothesis to explain the commensal paradox
423(5)
Cellular microbiology and idiopathic diseases
428(3)
The application of cellular microbiology to the generation of novel therapeutics
431(1)
Antibacterial agents
431(1)
Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs
432(1)
Anticancer therapy
432(1)
The future of cellular microbiology
432(5)
Index 437

Rewards Program

Write a Review