9780750669955

Plant Maintenance Management Set

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780750669955

  • ISBN10:

    0750669950

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-08-07
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science

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Summary

Plant asset management is a holistic approach to managing maintenance. Practical, accessible and business centred, these books provide a complete guide to understanding, planning, organising and managing maintenance. Together they cover the needs of any organisation with assets to maintain and manage. World-renowned expert Tony Kelly identifies real-world business aims and delivers a complete methodology for developing maintenance objectives, formulating a maintenance strategy, and designing and implementing maintenance systems that deliver. With full coverage of key techniques including TPM, RCM and CMMP, this is the complete maintenance management resource. 1. The most comprehensive guide to all aspects of managing and executing maintenance 2. World-renowned author with stand-out ability to cover this huge subject comprehensively and rigorously 3. Fully developed for professionals and students, with both theory and practice and cases form ranging from the process industries to customer services systems

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Author's biography xv
Part 1 Introductory chapters
1(50)
Maintenance and the industrial organization
3(6)
Introduction
4(2)
A systems view of maintenance management
6(3)
Plant acquisition policy and maintenance life-cycle costs
9(14)
Introduction
10(1)
Capital asset management
11(6)
Summary
17(6)
Formulating maintenance strategy: A business-centered approach
23(28)
Introduction
24(1)
Business-centered maintenance
25(2)
An example of the application of BCM: background
27(2)
Part A: Audit of the FPP maintenance department
29(15)
Maintenance objectives
29(1)
Life plans and preventive schedule
30(4)
Maintenance organization
34(4)
Maintenance work planning
38(3)
Maintenance control system
41(1)
Maintenance documentation
42(1)
Audit summary
43(1)
Part B: An alternative maintenance strategy for continuous operation
44(1)
Part C: A longer-term view of organizational change
45(1)
The strategic thought process
45(6)
Part 2 Maintenance objectives and task selection
51(110)
The structure of industrial plant
53(14)
Introduction
54(1)
Physical asset systems
54(1)
Modeling industrial plant
55(5)
The reason for maintenance
60(1)
Capital replacement policy
61(1)
Maintenance strategy
62(5)
Maintenance objectives
67(18)
Introduction
68(1)
Maintenance resources and plant output factors
69(5)
Maintenance resources (men, spares and tools)
69(1)
Maintenance resources and plant longevity
69(1)
Maintenance resources and desired plant safety (equipment integrity)
70(1)
Maintenance resources and product output
70(4)
A generic statement of a plant maintenance objective
74(1)
A procedure for formulating maintenance objectives
75(4)
Maintenance objectives and maintenance performance indices
79(1)
Maintenance objectives in practice
79(6)
Preventive maintenance decision-making Part 1: Principles, concepts and techniques
85(34)
Introduction
86(2)
Plant items and their failure characteristics
88(4)
The plan item: a definition
88(1)
Maintainability diagrams
89(2)
The items function, failure consequences and failure modes
91(1)
The preventive maintenance decision problem
92(3)
The maintenance actions
95(7)
The alternative actions and their characteristics
95(1)
The repair vs replace decision
95(4)
Reconditioning: internal vs contract
99(2)
In-situ repair techniques and the repair vs replace decision
101(1)
The timing of the maintenance action: maintenance policy
102(17)
Fixed-time maintenance
102(4)
Condition-based maintenance
106(7)
Operate-to-failure
113(1)
Opportunity maintenance
113(1)
Design-out maintenance
114(1)
Establishing the best maintenance policy
114(5)
Preventive maintenance decision-making Part 2: Maintenance task selection
119(20)
Introduction
120(2)
Examples of maintenance task selection
122(4)
Example 1: The rubber lining of a chemical reaction vessel
122(1)
Example 2: The rotary joint of a paper machine
123(3)
Example 3: The roller element bearings of a paper machine
126(1)
Assembling the maintenance life plan for a unit
126(4)
Standby units and the life plan
130(9)
Maintenance task selection using reliability-centered maintenance
139(22)
Introduction
140(1)
The RCM procedure
140(5)
Application of RCM to a chemical plant
145(16)
Background
145(1)
Final reaction stage: the process and equipment
146(1)
RCM analysis of the final reactor
147(14)
Part 3 The top-down bottom-up approach
161(32)
Determining the life plan and schedule: The top-down bottom-up approach
163(30)
Introduction
164(4)
The TDBUA
168(19)
Outline of TDBUA
168(1)
Step 1: Understanding the structure and characteristics of operation of the plant (the `top-down' stage of the analysis)
168(5)
Step 2: Establishing a maintenance life plan for each unit of plant (the `bottom-up' analysis)
173(7)
Step 3: Establishing a preventive maintenance schedule for the plant (putting it all together)
180(7)
Comments on the TDBUA
187(2)
Using the TDBUA
189(4)
Part 4 Controlling plant reliability
193(12)
Controlling plant reliability
195(10)
Introduction
196(1)
Reactive control of plant reliability
196(2)
Proactive control of plant reliability
198(1)
Incorporating reliability control systems into the organization
198(7)
Part 5 Exercises
205(10)
Exercises on maintenance strategy
207(8)
Exercise 11.1 An alumina refinery
208(2)
Exercise 11.2 A gold mine milling process
210(5)
Part 6 Case studies
215(52)
Case studies of maintenance strategy
217(50)
Case study 1 An audit of the maintenance strategy for an agricultural chemical plant
218(12)
Introduction
218(1)
An overview of Fertec
219(2)
Objectives
221(1)
Maintenance strategy
222(1)
Plant-operating characteristics
222(1)
Ammonia plant strategy
222(6)
Comments and recommendations on strategy
228(2)
Case study 2 Maintenance strategy review of an aluminum smelter
230(10)
Introduction
230(1)
An overview of Smeltall
230(2)
Carbon plant process flow: overall operation
232(3)
Green-mix plant-operating characteristics and maintenance strategy
235(1)
Operating characteristics
235(1)
Maintenance strategy
235(1)
Comments and recommendations
236(1)
Ring furnace maintenance characteristics and strategy
236(1)
Operating characteristics
236(2)
Ring furnace maintenance strategy
238(1)
Comments and recommendations
239(1)
Summary
240(1)
Case study 3 A review of the maintenance strategy in a petroleum refinery
240(3)
Introduction
240(1)
Plant-operating characteristics
240(2)
Maintenance strategy
242(1)
A schedule of outage work for the main process streams
242(1)
A schedule of maintenance work for the standby equipment (e.g. for pumps)
242(1)
Online inspection routines
243(1)
Observations
243(1)
Case study 4 Maintenance strategy in the coal mining industry
243(4)
Introduction
243(1)
An overview of COALCOM
244(3)
Case study 5 Maintaining an open-cut coal mine
247(3)
Introduction
247(1)
Operating characteristics of an open-cut mine
247(1)
Modeling fleet operation: status diagrams
248(1)
Summary
249(1)
Case study 6 Maintenance strategy for a passenger transport fleet
250(5)
Introduction
250(1)
Fleet-operating characteristics
250(1)
Outline of the existing maintenance strategy
250(2)
Maintenance strategy review
252(2)
Comments
254(1)
Case studies Case studies in the electrical power utilities
255(2)
Introduction
255(1)
Operating characteristics of an electricity supply system
255(2)
Case study 7 A gas-fired power station
257(2)
The station and its operating characteristics
257(1)
The maintenance strategy in use when the station provided base load
257(1)
Maintenance strategy review for two-shift operation
257(2)
Case study 8 An oil-fired power station
259(3)
The station and its operating characteristics
259(1)
Production and maintenance objectives
259(1)
Maintenance strategy before privatization
260(1)
Steam units
260(1)
Gas turbine
260(1)
Maintenance strategy after privatization
261(1)
Case study 9 A transmission system
262(2)
Equipment-operating characteristics
262(1)
Maintenance strategy mapping
263(1)
Case study 10 A distribution system
264(3)
Appendix 1 Maintenance terminology
267(2)
Appendix 2 In-situ repair techniques
269(6)
Appendix 3 Introductory failure statistics
275(6)
The statistical parameters of component lifetimes
275(6)
Probability density functions
276(1)
The Normal or `wear-out' pdf
277(1)
The negative exponential, or `random failure' pdf
278(1)
The hyper-exponential, or `running-in' pdf
278(2)
The whole-life item failure profile
280(1)
Index 281(8)
Preface xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Author's biography xv
Part 1 Introductory chapters
1(54)
A business-centered approach to maintenance organization
3(26)
Introduction
4(1)
Business-centered maintenance
4(1)
An example of the application of BCM: background
5(2)
Part A: Audit of the FPP maintenance department
7(15)
Maintenance objectives
7(1)
Life plans and preventive schedule
8(3)
Workload
11(2)
Maintenance organization
13(3)
Maintenance work planning
16(2)
Maintenance control system
18(1)
Maintenance documentation
19(2)
Audit summary
21(1)
Part B: An alternative maintenance strategy for continuous operation
22(1)
Part C: A longer-term view of organizational change
23(1)
The strategic thought process
23(6)
Maintenance organization in outline
29(10)
Introduction
30(1)
Modeling the organization
31(2)
Factors influencing the design of the maintenance organization
33(6)
The maintenance workload
39(16)
Introduction
40(1)
Categorization of the maintenance workload
40(3)
Mapping the workload
43(3)
First-line workload
43(2)
Second-line workload
45(1)
Third-line workload
46(1)
Forecasting the maintenance workload
46(3)
First-line workload
47(1)
Second-line workload
47(1)
Third-line workload
48(1)
Case studies in categorizing and mapping the maintenance workload
49(6)
Ammonia plant
49(1)
Chemical plant
49(1)
Agricultural chemicals
50(1)
Alumina refining
51(4)
Part 2 Maintenance organizational concepts, trends and mapping
55(96)
Maintenance resource structure
57(32)
Introduction
58(1)
Mapping the resource structure
58(4)
Resource characteristics
62(5)
Manpower
63(1)
Spare parts
63(1)
Tools
64(1)
Information
64(3)
A decision model for the design or modification of a resource structure
67(1)
The key decision-making areas of resource structuring
68(11)
Contract labor
68(3)
Trade-force composition
71(3)
Plant specialization
74(1)
Trade-force location
74(1)
Non-daywork maintenance cover
75(2)
Sizing the trade-force
77(1)
Locations of spares, tools and information
78(1)
Logistics
79(1)
A systematic procedure for determining a resource structure
79(5)
For a new plant
79(2)
For an existing resource structure
81(3)
Summary
84(5)
Maintenance administrative structure
89(22)
Introduction
90(1)
Modeling administrative structures
90(1)
Traditional views on administrative management and some guidelines
91(6)
Characteristics of maintenance administrative structures
97(10)
The maintenance--engineering interface
97(2)
The maintenance--production interface
99(4)
Responsibility for spare parts management
103(1)
Vertical polarization
103(1)
The relationship between the professional engineer and the maintenance supervisor
104(1)
Major overhaul administration
104(2)
Summary
106(1)
The design or modification of the administrative structure
107(4)
Human factors in maintenance management
111(16)
Introduction
112(1)
What are `human factors' in organizations?
112(1)
The human relations approach to management: a brief review
113(1)
Maintenance management behavioral characteristics
114(9)
Individual behavioral characteristics
115(5)
Group behavioral characteristics
120(3)
The effect of outsourcing alliances
123(1)
Auditing maintenance management human factors
124(3)
Trends in maintenance organization
127(24)
Introduction
128(1)
Traditional maintenance organizations
128(1)
Centralized resource structures
129(4)
Introduction of flexible working practices
133(3)
Plant manufacturing units
136(3)
Slimming the structure ('downsizing')
139(3)
The movement toward self-empowered plant-oriented teams
142(3)
Contracting, outsourcing and alliances
145(2)
Summary
147(4)
Part 3 Maintenance organization case studies
151(94)
Case study 1: Moving with the times
153(16)
Introduction
154(1)
Background
154(2)
Audit of the CMG
156(6)
Setting up the alliance
162(2)
Observations
164(5)
Case studies 2 and 3: Cautionary tales of organizational change
169(16)
Introduction
170(1)
Case study 2: A bottling plant
170(5)
Background
170(1)
The plant maintenance strategy and organization
171(2)
Organizational change: the way forward
173(1)
Short-term actions
174(1)
Case study 3: An aluminum rolling mill
175(10)
Background
175(2)
Plant-operating characteristics and objectives
177(1)
Life plans and preventive schedules
177(1)
An overview of the organization
178(3)
Maintenance systems
181(1)
Observations and recommendations
182(3)
Case study 4: Reorganization of a colliery
185(24)
Introduction
186(1)
Maintenance consultancy at COALCOM -- 1994
186(15)
Background to COALCOM
186(1)
Equipment and operating characteristics
187(2)
Production and maintenance objectives
189(1)
Life plans and preventive schedule
189(2)
Maintenance organization
191(5)
Maintenance systems
196(1)
Recommendations
196(5)
Progress visit and consultancy -- 1997
201(8)
Introduction
201(1)
Organization
201(3)
Life plans and preventive schedule
204(1)
Recommendations -- 1997
204(5)
Case study 5: The do's and don'ts of maintenance teams
209(10)
Introduction
210(1)
Characteristics of teams at Fertec B
210(3)
Characteristics of teams at Cario
213(1)
Improving team operation at Fertec B
214(1)
General comments on maintenance teams
215(4)
Case study 6: Maintenance audit of an agricultural chemical plant
219(26)
Introduction
220(1)
An overview of Fertec A
220(2)
Objectives
222(2)
Comments on objectives
222(2)
Maintenance strategy
224(8)
Plant-operating characteristics
224(1)
Ammonia plant maintenance strategy
224(8)
Maintenance organization
232(13)
Introduction
232(1)
The maintenance resource structure
232(4)
The maintenance administrative structure
236(9)
Part 4 Total productive maintenance
245(22)
Total productive maintenance: its uses and limitations
247(20)
Introduction
248(1)
What is TPM?
248(1)
An early case study
249(4)
Fundamentals of TPM
253(3)
European applications by non-Japanese companies
256(5)
Summary
261(6)
Part 5 Exercises
267(22)
Course exercises
269(20)
Exercise E14.1: The changing role of the maintenance supervisor
269(5)
Background
269(1)
Part A: The supervisor's role in a traditional organization
270(1)
Part B: The role of the supervisor after a `downsizing' exercise
270(2)
Part C: Introduction of self-empowered work teams
272(2)
Exercise E14.2: Maintenance reorganization in a food processing plant
274(15)
Background
274(2)
Company organization and maintenance strategy
276(4)
The problem
280(9)
Index 289
Preface xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Author's biography xv
Part 1 Introductory chapters
1(38)
A business-centered approach to maintenance systems
3(30)
Introduction
4(1)
Business-centered maintenance
4(2)
An example of the application of BCM: background
6(1)
Part A: Audit of the FPP maintenance department
7(18)
Maintenance objectives
8(1)
Life plans and preventive schedule
9(2)
Workload
11(1)
Maintenance organization
12(4)
Maintenance work planning
16(3)
Maintenance control system
19(4)
Maintenance documentation
23(2)
Audit summary
25(1)
Part B: An alternative maintenance strategy for continuous operation
25(1)
Part C: A longer-term view of organizational change
26(1)
The strategic thought process
27(6)
Introduction to maintenance management systems
33(6)
The company expressed as a hierarchic systems model
34(2)
Identifying the maintenance systems
36(3)
Part 2 Budgeting and control
39(32)
Maintenance budgeting
41(12)
Introduction
42(1)
Maintenance budgeting
42(3)
The budgeting procedure
45(8)
Maintenance management control
53(18)
Introduction
54(1)
The basics of maintenance management control
55(1)
Principles of maintenance management control
56(1)
The control of overall maintenance performance
57(4)
The control of maintenance effectiveness (the control of plant reliability)
61(2)
Reactive control of plant reliability
61(1)
Pro-active control of unit reliability
62(1)
The control of organizational efficiency
63(1)
Incorporating systems into the organization
64(3)
Published methods for measuring maintenance performance
67(1)
The use of indices of maintenance performance for inter-firm comparisons
67(1)
Human factors and data collection
67(4)
Part 3 Work planning and work control
71(64)
Short-term work planning and control
73(18)
Introduction
74(1)
The fundamentals of work planning
74(1)
Modeling the operation of a short-term work planning system
75(8)
The shift work planning system
79(2)
The weekend work planning system
81(1)
Feedback of maintenance data for control
82(1)
Comments on work planning and work control
83(1)
Guidelines for the design of work planning systems
84(4)
Safety aspects
88(3)
Management of plant turnarounds -- Part 1: Network analysis
91(18)
Introduction
92(1)
Terms, concepts and definitions in network analysis
93(3)
The network planning procedure
96(7)
Data collection
97(1)
Constructing the logic diagram
97(2)
Establishing the critical path, floats and overhaul time
99(2)
Deriving a bar chart from the network
101(1)
Resource histograms
102(1)
Comments
103(6)
Management of plant turnarounds -- Part 2: Turnaround methodology
109(26)
Introduction
110(1)
Phase 1: Initiating the turnaround
110(4)
Forming a policy team and appointing a turnaround manager
110(3)
Key policy decisions for the initiation phase
113(1)
Selecting a preparation team
114(1)
Collecting the job lists and other data
114(1)
Phase 2: Preparing the turnaround
114(14)
Analyzing and validating the workscope
114(2)
Freezing the worklist
116(1)
Preparing task specifications
116(1)
Identifying pre-shutdown work
116(4)
Defining contractor work packages and selecting contractors
120(1)
Creating the work schedule
120(1)
Techniques for creating a schedule
120(3)
Optimizing the schedule
123(1)
Forming the turnaround organization
123(2)
Defining the site logistics
125(1)
Formulating a cost estimate
125(1)
Formulating a safety plan
126(1)
Formulation of the quality plan
127(1)
Briefing of all turnaround personnel
127(1)
Phase 3: Executing the turnaround
128(2)
The shutdown of the plant
128(1)
Carrying out the turnaround tasks
129(1)
Defining and costing the extra work
129(1)
Defining and costing additional work
129(1)
Monitoring progress, productivity, safety, quality and expenditure
129(1)
Starting up the plant
130(1)
Phase 4: Terminating the turnaround
130(5)
Part 4 Spare parts management
135(30)
Spare parts management
137(28)
Introduction
138(1)
Outline of the stores operation
139(3)
Inventory policy
142(8)
Inventory policy for fast-moving spares
142(3)
Inventory policies for the control of slow-moving spares
145(5)
Management of repairable equipment (rotables)
150(5)
Introduction
150(1)
The rotable system
150(3)
Rotable inventory policy: the theory
153(2)
Rotable inventory policy: in practice
155(1)
Inventory policy guidelines
155(1)
Stores documentation
156(4)
Stores organization
160(1)
Stores and rotable performance indices
161(1)
Summary
162(3)
Part 5 Documentation
165(34)
Maintenance documentation systems: what they are and how they work
167(22)
Introduction
168(1)
A functional model
168(2)
Plant inventory (Module 1)
170(2)
Information base (Element 2)
172(5)
Preventive maintenance schedule (Module 3)
177(2)
Condition monitoring (Module 4)
179(1)
Short-term work planning (Module 5)
180(2)
Long-term work planning (Module 6)
182(3)
Maintenance control (Module 7)
185(2)
Summary
187(2)
Computerized maintenance information systems: their uses and problems
189(10)
Introduction
190(1)
Computerized documentation: historical background
190(3)
The benefits of computerized maintenance information systems
193(2)
The problems with computerized maintenance information systems
195(1)
Summary
196(3)
Part 6 Case study
199(30)
Case study: Maintenance audit of an agricultural chemical plant
201(28)
Introduction
202(1)
An overview of Fertec A
202(1)
Objectives
203(3)
Comments on objectives
204(2)
Maintenance strategy
206(6)
Plant-operating characteristics
206(1)
Ammonia plant maintenance strategy
206(6)
Maintenance organization
212(5)
Introduction
212(1)
The maintenance resource structure
212(3)
The maintenance administrative structure
215(2)
Work planning systems
217(8)
Short-term work planning, scheduling and control
217(6)
The planning of the major shutdowns
223(2)
Spare parts management
225(1)
Introduction
225(1)
Outline of the stores organization and systems
225(1)
Maintenance control
226(1)
The control of overall maintenance performance
226(1)
The control of organizational efficiency
226(1)
The control of maintenance effectiveness (plant reliability control)
227(1)
Documentation
227(2)
Comments and recommendations
228(1)
Appendix: Weibull analysis
229(6)
Weibull analysis of item lifetime
229(3)
Weibull probability paper
232(1)
A Weibull analysis of a large and complete sample of times-to-failure
232(3)
Index 235

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