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Play at the Center of the Curriculum,9780130474742

Play at the Center of the Curriculum

by ; ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130474742

ISBN10:
0130474746
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $61.00
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Summary

This is the third edition of the book that takes to heart the adage: Play is children's work. Believing that play is a primary factor in the development of intelligence, personality, competencies, self-awareness, and social awareness, the authors demonstrate how to draw from spontaneous play both the methods and the content of a successful curriculum for children from birth to age eight. The book introduces the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Mead, and many contemporary researchers; explores the traditional curriculum arenas of early childhood education; and includes discussion of the role of work, adult models, and authority in children's play. For teachers specializing in Early Childhood Education, pre-school teachers, day-care personnel, parents, and anyone with an interest and involvement in the education, development, and care of young children.

Table of Contents

Looking at Play Through Teachers' Eyes
1(20)
Play at the Center of a Developmentally Based Curriculum
3(7)
Play as a Fundamental Human Activity
4(1)
The Power of Play in Development
4(1)
Grounding Practice in Theory, Research, and the Wisdom of Practitioners
4(3)
Play at the Center of a Balanced Curriculum
7(2)
The Play Continuum
9(1)
How Teachers of Young Children View Play
10(5)
Play Through the Eyes of Brandon's Teacher
10(5)
Play: The Core of Developmentally Based Practice
15(2)
The Critical Role of the Teacher in the Emergent Curriculum
15(2)
Summary and Conclusion
17(4)
The Development of Play
21(22)
A Constructivist View of Play and Learning
23(1)
Piaget: Development and Play
24(5)
Three Types of Knowledge
25(2)
Piaget: The Development of Play
27(2)
Vygotsky: Development and Play
29(2)
Vygotksy's Levels of Symbolic Play
31(1)
Mead: Play and the Developing Sense of Self
31(3)
The Play Stage
32(1)
The Game Stage
33(1)
The Generalized Other Stage
33(1)
Concepts of Self and Other
34(1)
Erikson: Play and Mastery of the Inner World of Childhood
35(1)
Initiative and Guilt
35(1)
Industry and Inferiority: Play and Work in Middle Childhood
36(1)
Research Perspectives on the Development of Play
36(4)
Parten's Research on Play and Social Participation
37(2)
Research on Play and the Peer Culture
39(1)
Summary and Conclusion
40(3)
Play as the Cornerstone of Development
43(22)
Play as the Cornerstone of Intellectual Development
44(12)
Play and the Development of Symbolic Thought
45(5)
Play and the Development of Language and Literacy
50(2)
Play and Logical-Mathematical Thinking
52(2)
Play and Problem Solving
54(2)
Play as the Cornerstone of Imagination and Creativity
56(2)
Three Aspects of Imagination and Fantasy
56(2)
Play as the Cornerstone of Social-Moral Development
58(4)
Play and the Culture of School
60(2)
Summary and Conclusion
62(3)
Orchestrating Children's Play: Setting the Stage
65(24)
Principles Guiding Orchestration
67(2)
Taking the Child's View
67(1)
Teacher as Keen Observer
68(1)
Seeing Meaning as It Is Constructed
68(1)
Teacher as Stage Manager
68(1)
A Continuum of Strategies
69(16)
Setting the Stage for Play
70(1)
Preparing the Physical Space for Play
70(10)
Planning the Daily Schedule
80(1)
Extensions for Play
81(4)
Play and the School: Helping Parents and Educators Value Play in the Lives of Children
85(2)
Summary and Conclusion
87(2)
Orchestrating Play: Interactions with Children
89(24)
Play and Scaffolding
92(1)
Guided Play
93(8)
The Artist Apprentice
95(1)
The Peacemaker
95(1)
Guardian of the Gate
96(1)
Parallel Player
97(1)
Spectator
98(1)
Participant
99(1)
Matchmaker
100(1)
Storyplayer
100(1)
Play Tutor
100(1)
Choosing a Strategy
101(9)
Considering Children with Special Needs
102(1)
Timing Is Everything: Entering and Exiting Children's Play
103(1)
Responding to Violent Play
104(2)
Guiding Children's Violent Play
106(2)
Building a Peaceful Classroom
108(2)
Summary and Conclusion
110(3)
The Arts in the Play-Centered Curriculum
113(30)
Planning for the Arts in the Play-Based Curriculum
115(12)
Entering the Child's World of Spontaneous Play
115(1)
Incorporating Artwork
116(2)
The Arts: Mirror of Development and Guide for Curriculum Design
118(1)
Heidi's Horses: Documents of Change and Growth
118(1)
Staff and Environmental Support for Play in the Arts
119(1)
Time, Space, Materials, and Teacher Know-How
119(8)
Monitoring the Quality and Challenge of Play in the Arts
127(9)
Guided and Directed Play in the Arts
128(6)
Children's Play Interests Supported in a Responsive Curriculum
134(1)
Integration of Children's Experiences and Feelings Through Play in the Arts
135(1)
A Balanced Arts Curriculum
136(1)
When Teachers Talk
136(4)
Summary and Conclusion
140(3)
Science in the Play-Centered Curriculum
143(24)
Scientists Tour the Kindergarten
146(2)
Outdoor Area
146(1)
The Block Area
147(1)
Art Area
147(1)
Science in the Early Childhood Integrated Curriculum
148(8)
The Goal of Early Childhood Science Education
148(3)
The Nature of Science
151(2)
The Nature of the Child
153(3)
Extending the Science Curriculum
156(6)
Developing an Environment for Exploration of the Physical World Through Spontaneous Play
157(1)
Encouraging Further Exploration of the Environment
158(1)
Interacting with Children in Their Play
158(1)
Extensions for Play
159(1)
Play-Generated Curriculum
159(1)
Curriculum-Generated Play
160(1)
Recasting the Curriculum in Play
161(1)
When Teachers Talk
162(2)
Summary and Conclusion
164(3)
Mathematics in the Play-Centered Curriculum
167(26)
Mathematics Education and Young Children
168(9)
The Nature of Mathematics
170(1)
The Development of Operational Knowledge
171(2)
Assessing Children's Development of Mathematical Thinking
173(2)
Mathematics Education Based on the Nature of Mathematics, Children's Development, and Children's Interests
175(1)
The Other Cornerstone
176(1)
Children's Interests
177(1)
Some Basic Mathematical Concepts and Examples of How They Are Supported in Children's Spontaneous Play
177(7)
Spatial Relationships
177(2)
Relationships Involving Quantity
179(4)
Mathematics and Problem Solving
183(1)
Orchestrating Play in Mathematics
184(4)
Setting the Stage
184(1)
Accessorizing: Transforming the Environment to Extend and Enrich Play
185(1)
Play-Generated Curricula
185(1)
Curriculum-Generated Play
186(2)
When Teachers Talk
188(2)
Mathematics, Equity, and the Play Continuum
189(1)
Summary and Conclusion
190(3)
Language, Literacy, and Play
193(30)
Play and Literate Behavior: A Natural Partnership
195(3)
Communication as a Prerequisite for Play with Others
196(2)
Play as a Form of Communication
198(1)
Fostering Literate Behaviors
198(8)
The Value of the Play-Based Curriculum
198(1)
Early Story Constructions
199(1)
How the Play-Based Literacy Curriculum Serves Children of All Cultures and Languages
200(3)
Masha's Story
203(3)
Honoring the Importance of Literate Behaviors
206(1)
Writing and Graphics
206(1)
Language and Literacy Learning in an Early Elementary Classroom: The Motivating Power of Play
207(3)
How the Multimedia Extends Meanings of Literacy
210(1)
Dynamic Approaches to Promoting Literate Behavior Through Play
210(7)
Using Drama Techniques to Enhance Socio-Dramatic Play
210(3)
Story Dictation and Story Playing
213(4)
Balanced Opportunities for Spontaneous and Guided Play Support Literacy
217(1)
When Teachers Talk
218(1)
Summary and Conclusion
219(4)
Play and Socialization
223(28)
Saying Good-Bye to Parents
224(4)
``Little Dragon''
225(3)
Diversity Creates Challenges for Teachers
228(3)
Matthew
228(1)
``Quicksand''
229(2)
Traditional Research and Practice
231(1)
Current Practice Illuminated by Research
232(5)
Differences in Boys' and Girls' Play and Socialization
233(1)
``Tough Guys''
233(2)
Children's Negotiations Create a Dynamic Context for Play
235(1)
Newspapers
236(1)
Play Provides a Bridge Between Theory and Practice
237(3)
The Interpretive Approach
238(1)
Teachers Take a Research Stance
239(1)
Studying the Context of Children's Social Interactions
240(8)
Creating Play Fantasies
240(1)
Play Settings That Constrain Peer Talk and Interaction
241(1)
Solitary and Parallel Play Re-examined
242(1)
Initiating and Sustaining Play Interactions
243(1)
Spatial Arrangement Supports Interactive Play
243(1)
Children Grant Warrants for Play
244(1)
``Quicksand'' Revisited
245(3)
When Teachers Talk
248(1)
Summary and Conclusion
248(3)
Play, Toys, and Technology
251(26)
Types of Toys
253(2)
Toys and Development
255(2)
Toys That Limit Development
256(1)
Games with Rules
257(2)
Planning for Development in Game Play
257(1)
Selecting Appropriate Games for Young Children
258(1)
Toys and the Marketplace
259(2)
Toy Safety
259(2)
Media-Based Play
261(1)
Television and Children's Play
261(1)
Computer Play and Young Children
262(8)
Tool Software
264(1)
Guiding Play with Computers as Tools
265(1)
Computer Simulations, Games, and Books
266(1)
Integrating Technology
267(1)
Choosing Computer Software
268(2)
Structuring the Physical Space
270(1)
When Teachers Talk
270(4)
Race, Ethnicity, Toys, and the Media
272(1)
Gender, Toys, and the Media
272(1)
Developing Gender Identity
273(1)
Summary and Conclusion
274(3)
Play as a Tool for Assessment
277(28)
Assessing Development Through Play at the Bank
278(1)
Assessing Age-Appropriate Development
279(4)
Assessing Individual Development
283(3)
Intelligence Is Multifaceted
283(3)
Play Informs Assessment Strategies
286(1)
Ascertaining the Child's Viewpoint
287(2)
Principles for Framing Play Questions
287(1)
Challenge Children's Thinking in Play
288(1)
Strategies for Collecting and Organizing Information
289(7)
Portfolios
289(2)
Videotape
291(1)
Checklists
292(3)
Assessing Play as Play
295(1)
Defining the Purposes of Assessment
296(3)
Play and Assessments of Children with Special Needs
298(1)
Communicating with Parents About Play and Assessment
299(2)
When Teachers Talk
301(1)
Summary and Conclusion
302(3)
Conclusion: Integrating Play, Development, and Practice
305(26)
Constructivism and Development
307(3)
What Is Developed?
307(1)
Means-Ends Coordinations and Development
308(2)
Constructivism and Social-Cultural Theories of Play
310(2)
Jean Piaget (1896--1980)
310(1)
Lev Vygotsky (1896--1934)
311(1)
Connecting Piaget's and Vygotsky's Theories
312(1)
A Closer Look at Piaget and Constructivist Theory
312(5)
Schemes: Assimilation, Accommodation, and Play
312(1)
How Do We Know Intelligence Is Constructed and Lawful?
313(1)
Stages of Development and Play
314(2)
The Construction of Reality
316(1)
Social Experience and the Construction of Rationality
317(2)
Play and Development
319(5)
Play and the Development of Intelligence
319(1)
Play and the Development of Personality
320(2)
Play and the Development of Competencies
322(1)
Play and the Development of Social Consciousness
323(1)
The Play-Based Curriculum in the Postmodern World
324(1)
The Meaning of Play in Childhood and Society
324(5)
The Adult World as a Condition in the Child's Life
324(2)
Play and the Work of Society
326(1)
Adult Models as Content for Development
327(1)
Autonomy as the Context for Development
328(1)
Summary and Conclusion
329(2)
References 331(24)
Index 355


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