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Play at the Center of the Curriculum,9780131720824
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Play at the Center of the Curriculum

by ; ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131720824

ISBN10:
0131720821
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

This book discusses the value of play in diverse early childhood classrooms and how curriculum can support play. Key changes to this edition include the integration of standards and examples of how encouraging certain types of play can meet standards, expanded coverage of cultural diversity and supporting play in children with special needs, and expanded coverage of integrating the content areas. More than any other books on play, this book focuses on how content areas can be taught and standards met through play.

Table of Contents

Looking at Play Through Teachers' Eyes
1(25)
Play at the Center of a Developmentally Based Curriculum
3(8)
Play as a Fundamental Human Activity
4(1)
The Power of Play in Development
5(1)
Grounding Practice in Theory, Research, and the Wisdom of Practitioners
5(3)
Play at the Center of a Balanced Curriculum
8(2)
The Play Continuum
10(1)
How Teachers of Young Children View Play
11(5)
Play: The Core of Developmentally Appropriate Practice
16(1)
Addressing Standards in the Play-Centered Curriculum
17(3)
The Purpose of Standards
17(1)
Guidelines for Developing Appropriate Standards for Young Children
18(1)
The Challenges of Standards
19(1)
The Critical Role of the Teacher in the Curriculum
20(1)
Summary and Conclusion
21(3)
Suggested Resources
24(2)
The Development of Play
26(23)
A Constructivist View of Play and Learning
28(1)
Piaget's Developmental Theory and Play
29(6)
Three Types of Knowledge
31(2)
Piaget: The Development of Play
33(2)
Vygotsky: Development and Play
35(3)
The Zone of Proximal Development
36(1)
Interpersonal to Intrapersonal Processes in Learning
37(1)
Understanding of Rules
37(1)
Vygotsky's Levels of Symbolic Play
38(1)
Mead: Play and the Developing Sense of Self
38(2)
The Play Stage
38(2)
The Game Stage
40(1)
The Generalized Other Stage
40(1)
Concepts of Self and Other in ``Theory of Mind''
40(1)
Erikson: Play and Mastery in the Inner World of Childhood
41(3)
Infancy: Trust and Mistrust
42(1)
Toddlerhood: Autonomy, Shame, and Doubt
42(1)
Early Childhood: Initiative and Guilt
42(2)
Industry and Inferiority: Play and Work in Middle Childhood
44(1)
Research Perspectives on the Development of Play
44(2)
Parten's Research on Play and Social Participation
44(2)
Summary and Conclusion
46(1)
Suggested Resources
47(2)
Play as the Cornerstone of Development
49(28)
Play as the Cornerstone of Intellectual Development
51(15)
Play and the Development of Symbolic Thought
51(6)
Play and the Development of Language and Literacy
57(3)
Play and Logical-Mathematical Thinking
60(3)
Play and Problem Solving
63(1)
Play-Centered Curriculum Supports Children with Special Needs
64(2)
Play as the Cornerstone of Imagination and Creativity
66(4)
Three Aspects of Imagination and Fantasy
67(3)
Play as the Cornerstone of Emotional Development
70(3)
Play and the Harsh Realities of Some Children's Lives
72(1)
Play as the Cornerstone of Social-Moral Development
73(2)
Play and Peers
74(1)
Summary and Conclusion
75(1)
Suggested Resources
75(2)
Orchestrating Children's Play: Setting the Stage
77(33)
Principles Guiding Play Orchestration
79(2)
Taking the Child's View
79(1)
Teacher as Keen Observer
80(1)
Seeing Meaning as It Is Constructed
80(1)
Teacher as Stage Manager
81(1)
A Continuum of Play Orchestration Strategies
81(1)
Setting the Stage for Play
81(18)
Preparing the Physical Space for Play
82(14)
Play Safety
96(1)
Planning the Daily Schedule
97(2)
Extensions for Play
99(7)
Play-Generated Curriculum
99(1)
Curriculum-Generated Play
99(7)
When Teachers Talk: Helping Parents and Educators Value Play
106(1)
Summary and Conclusion
107(1)
Suggested Resources
107(3)
Orchestrating Play: Interactions with Children
110(29)
Play and Scaffolding
112(1)
Spontaneous, Guided, and Directed Play
113(12)
The Artist Apprentice
116(1)
The Peacemaker
117(1)
Guardian of the Gate
118(2)
Parallel Player
120(1)
Spectator
121(1)
Participant
121(1)
Matchmaker
122(1)
Storyplayer
123(1)
Play Tutor
123(2)
Choosing a Strategy
125(3)
Challenges in Play for Children with Special Needs
125(1)
Challenges in Play for Children Who Are English Language Learners
126(1)
Timing Is Everything: Entering and Exiting Children's Play
127(1)
Play and the Culture of School
128(2)
Responding to Violent Play
130(6)
Ascertain Children's Purposes in Play
131(1)
How Willing Are Teachers to Confront Their Own Beliefs and Experiences?
132(1)
Diffusing Violence in Play
133(3)
When Teachers Talk: Building a Peaceful Classroom
136(1)
Summary and Conclusion
137(1)
Suggested Resources
137(2)
Play as a Tool for Assessment
139(34)
Assessing Development Through Play at the Bank
140(2)
Assessing Age-Appropriate Development
142(5)
Assessing Skills and Concepts
143(4)
Assessing Individual Development
147(3)
Intelligence Is Multifaceted
147(3)
How Play Informs Assessment
150(2)
Ascertaining the Child's Viewpoint
152(3)
Principles for Framing Play Questions
153(2)
Strategies for Collecting and Organizing Information
155(5)
Anecdotal Records
155(1)
Checklists
155(2)
Portfolios
157(1)
Documentation Assessment
158(1)
Videotape
159(1)
Assessing Play as Play
160(3)
Defining the Purposes of Assessment
163(3)
Features of Play-Centered Assessment
164(1)
Play and Assessments of Children with Special Needs
165(1)
Communicating with Parents About Play and Assessment
166(2)
When Teachers Talk: School Readiness and Academic Standards
168(2)
Summary and Conclusion
170(1)
Suggested Resources
171(2)
Mathematics in the Play-Centered Curriculum
173(29)
The Playful Nature of Mathematics
174(1)
Mathematical Concepts in the Play-Centered Curriculum
175(5)
Spatial Relationships
175(2)
Relationships Involving Quantity
177(3)
Mathematics and Problem Solving
180(1)
Mathematics in the Early Childhood Integrated Curriculum
180(12)
The Goal of Early Childhood Mathematics Education
181(1)
The Nature of Mathematics
182(2)
Assessing Children's Development of Mathematical Thinking
184(3)
Mathematics Education Based on the Nature of Mathematics, Children's Development, and Children's Interests
187(2)
Supporting Children from All Cultures and Children Who Are English Language Learners
189(2)
Supporting Children with Special Needs
191(1)
Children's Interests
191(1)
Orchestrating Play in Mathematics
192(5)
Setting the Stage
192(1)
Accessorizing: Transforming the Environment to Extend and Enrich Play
193(1)
Play-Generated Curricula
194(2)
Curriculum-Generated Play
196(1)
Addressing Standards in the Play-Centered Curriculum
197(2)
When Teachers Talk: Standards and Professional Expertise
199(1)
Summary and Conclusion
199(1)
Selected Resources
200(2)
Language, Literacy, and Play
202(34)
Play, Language, and Literate Behavior: A Natural Partnership
204(3)
Communication as a Prerequisite for Play with Others
206(1)
Play as a Form of Communication
207(1)
Fostering Literate Behaviors
207(9)
The Value of the Play-Based Curriculum
207(1)
Early Story Constructions
208(2)
How the Play-Based Literacy Curriculum Serves Children of All Cultures and Languages
210(2)
English Language Learners: Masha's Story
212(4)
Honoring the Importance of Literate Behaviors
216(3)
Writing and Graphics
216(2)
Awareness of Sounds and Patterns of Language
218(1)
Language and Literacy Learning in the Primary Grades: The Motivating Power of Play
219(4)
Multimedia Extends Meanings of Literacy
222(1)
Dynamic Approaches to Promoting Literacy Through Play
223(6)
Using Drama Techniques to Enhance Sociodramatic Play
223(2)
Story Dictation and Story Playing
225(4)
Balanced Opportunities for Varied Kinds of Play Support Competencies in Language and Literacy
229(1)
Time for Language and Literacy in Play
229(1)
Space for Language and Literacy Learning
230(1)
Materials for Language, Literacy, and Reading and Writing in Play
230(1)
Guidance for Literacy in Play
230(1)
Standards for Literacy: Calls for Accountability
230(3)
When Teachers Talk: Turning Negatives Into Positives Through Language
233(1)
Summary and Conclusion
234(1)
Suggested Resources
235(1)
Science in the Play-Centered Curriculum
236(29)
Scientists Tour the Kindergarten
238(3)
Outdoor Area
239(1)
The Block Area
240(1)
The Art Area
241(1)
Science in the Early Childhood Integrated Curriculum
241(10)
The Goal of Early Childhood Science Education
241(3)
The Nature of Science
244(2)
The Nature of the Child
246(4)
The Child's Interests
250(1)
Meeting the Needs of Children Who Are English Language Learners
250(1)
Developing Inclusive Science Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
251(1)
Extending the Science Curriculum
251(6)
Setting the Stage for Learning About the Physical World Through Spontaneous Play
252(1)
Encouraging Further Exploration of the Environment
253(1)
Interacting with Children in Their Play
253(1)
Orchestrating Extensions for Play
254(1)
Play-Generated Curriculum
254(1)
Curriculum-Generated Play
255(2)
Recasting the Curriculum in Play
257(1)
Addressing Standards in the Play-Centered Curriculum
257(3)
When Teachers Talk: Developing Confidence in Teaching Science
260(2)
Summary and Conclusion
262(1)
Suggested Resources
262(3)
The Arts in the Play-Centered Curriculum
265(35)
Planning for the Arts in the Play-Centered Curriculum
267(3)
Entering the Child's World of Spontaneous Play
267(2)
Incorporating Artwork
269(1)
The Arts: Mirror of Development and Guide for Curriculum Design
270(23)
Heidi's Horses: Documents of Change and Growth
270(4)
Staff and Environmental Support for Play in the Arts
274(1)
Time, Space, Materials, and Teacher Know-How
274(3)
Presentation of Art Making and Constructive Play Materials
277(3)
Monitoring the Quality and Challenge of Play in the Arts
280(4)
Guided and Directed Play in the Arts
284(1)
Music and Movement in the Play-Based Curriculum
285(2)
Diverse Musical Traditions Enrich the Classroom Culture
287(1)
Children with Special Needs: Guiding for Mastery and Competence
288(2)
Children's Play Interests Reflected in a Play-Centered Curriculum
290(1)
Integration of Children's Experiences and Feelings Through Play in the Arts
291(1)
A Balanced Arts Curriculum
292(1)
When Teachers Talk: Respect for Art Materials
293(5)
Summary and Conclusion
298(1)
Suggested Resources
298(2)
Play and Socialization
300(33)
Saying Goodbye to Parents
301(4)
From Separation to Integration: John's Fire Hydrants
302(3)
Diversity Creates Enrichment and Challenge for Teachers
305(6)
Inclusion of Children with Special Needs
308(3)
Traditional Research and Practice
311(1)
Current Practice Illuminated by Research
312(8)
Differences in Boys' and Girls' Play and Socialization
312(3)
Children's Negotiations Create a Dynamic Context for Play
315(1)
Newspapers
315(2)
Play Provides a Bridge Between Theory and Practice
317(1)
The Interpretive Approach
317(1)
Teachers Take a Research Stance: Views from the Inside
318(1)
Children's Interactive Strategies
319(1)
Studying the Social Ecology of a Preschool Classroom
320(3)
Contrasts in Social Ecologies
320(3)
Solitary and Parallel Play Reexamined
323(6)
Teacher Support for Play Interactions
323(1)
Children Grant Warrants for Play
324(4)
Spatial Arrangement Supports Interactive Play
328(1)
Standards and Assessment in Early Childhood Programs
329(1)
When Teachers Talk: Social Science for Young Children
330(1)
Summary and Conclusion
330(1)
Suggested Resources
331(2)
Play, Toys, and Technology
333(30)
Types of Toys
335(2)
Toys and Development
337(4)
Games with Rules
338(1)
Toys That Limit Development
339(2)
Toys and the Marketplace
341(3)
Characteristics of Gender Identity
341(1)
Gender, Toys, and the Media
342(1)
Toys That Promote Growing Up Too Fast
343(1)
Toys That Portray Power Through Violence
344(1)
Media-Based Play
344(2)
Television and Children's Play
344(2)
Advocating for Childhood in an Age of Consumerism
346(2)
Encourage Good Children's Programming
347(1)
Computer Play and Young Children
348(9)
Tool Software
348(2)
Guiding Play with Computers as Tools
350(1)
Computer Simulations, Games, and Books
351(1)
Integrating Technology
352(3)
Choosing Computer Software
355(1)
Using Computer Technology to Extend Play and Projects
355(2)
Structuring the Physical Space for Computers
357(1)
When Teachers Talk: Concerns About Media and Stereotypes
357(2)
Summary and Conclusion
359(1)
Suggested Resources
360(3)
Conclusion: Integrating Play, Development, and Practice
363(30)
Constructivism and Development
365(3)
What Is Developed?
365(1)
Means-Ends Coordinations and Development
366(2)
Constructivism and Social-Cultural Theories of Play
368(3)
Jean Piaget (1896--1980)
368(1)
Lev Vygotsky (1896--1934)
369(1)
Connecting Piaget's and Vygotsky's Theories
370(1)
A Closer Look at Piaget and Constructivist Theory
371(5)
Schemes: Assimilation, Accommodation, and Play
371(1)
How Do We Know Intelligence Is Constructed and Lawful?
372(1)
Stages of Development and Play
372(2)
The Construction of Reality
374(2)
Social Experience and the Construction of Reality
376(2)
Play and Development
378(5)
Play and the Development of Intelligence
378(1)
Play and the Development of Personality
379(2)
Play and the Development of Competencies
381(1)
Play and the Development of the Social Self
382(1)
The Meaning of Play in Childhood and Society
383(7)
Play and the Work of Society
383(2)
Autonomy as the Context for Development
385(1)
Development, Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP), and Play
386(1)
Expectations for Ourselves and Our Children: Academic Standards
387(3)
Summary and Conclusion
390(1)
Suggested Resources
391(2)
References 393(26)
Name Index 419(7)
Subject Index 426


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