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The Poems of Hesiod

by
ISBN13:

9780806118468

ISBN10:
0806118466
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
5/1/1983
Publisher(s):
Univ of Oklahoma Pr

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Summary

"Besides Homer, there is Hesiod." These words still contain much truth today. Hesiod is a very important poet, and for this reason his two surviving poems, Theogonyand Works and Days,deserve to be presented as accurately and attractively as possible. R. M. Frazer has done this: His new translations are faithful to the matter and spirit of the originals, and his commentary makes the poems understandable and enjoyable. Hesiod is the first Greek and, therefore, the first European we can know as a real person, for, unlike Homer, he tells us about himself in his poems. Hesiod seems to have been a successful farmer and a rather gloomy though not humorless man. One suspects from his concern for the bachelor's lot and some rather unflattering remarks about women that he was never married. A close study of both poems reveals the same personality -that of a deeply religious man concerned with the problems of justice and fate. The Theogonyrepresents the first codification of the Greek pantheon. Hesiod, of course, did not invent the gods, but he gave the Greeks a clear picture of their forms, functions, and relationships. Thus, the poem deals with the high epic theme of the creation of the divine order of the world under the direction of Zeus. Works and Days,by contrast, considers justice and work in the context of Hesiod's own life. The difference in subject matter produces a difference in style: Theogonyis strongly influenced by the epic conventions; Works and Daysis more modern and freewheeling. To get a fuller picture of Hesiod and his poems, we must try to understand him in relation to his times. The eighth century, when Hesiod lived, was the time of the great Greek awakening after the period of relative darkness ushered in by the fall of the old Mycenaean kingdoms around 1125 B.C. Hesiod thus lived at the beginning of the Greek classical period, and his poems influenced not only that age but also Western culture in our day.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Hesiod's Life, Poetry, and Times
3(5)
Some Near Eastern Influences and Parallels
8(4)
The Succession Myth
8(2)
Wisdom Literature
10(1)
Prophecy
11(1)
Hesiod's Religious Thought
12(3)
Some Features of Hesiod's Style
15(2)
The Present Translation and Commentary
17(6)
Theogony
An Introductory Hymn to the Muses (lines 1-115)
23(7)
The Earliest Powers: Chaos, Gaia, Eros, and Night (lines 116-25)
30(2)
The Children of Gaia
32(6)
Ouranos, Pontos, and the Titans (lines 126-38)
32(1)
The Kyklopes and the Hundred-Handers (lines 139-53)
33(1)
Kronos Castrates Ouranos: The Rise of the Titans and the Birth of Aphrodite (lines 154-210)
34(4)
The Progeny of Night (lines 211-32)
38(2)
The Descendants of Pontos
40(8)
His Children: Nereus, Thaumas, Phorkys, Keto, and Eurybia (lines 233-39)
40(1)
The Daughters of Nereus (lines 240-64)
41(1)
The Children of Thaumas (lines 265-69)
42(1)
The Progeny of Phorkys and Keto: The Monsters (lines 270-336)
43(5)
Beneficent Titanic Powers
48(8)
The Children of Okeanos and Tethys (lines 337-70)
48(2)
The Children of Hyperion and Theia (lines 371-74)
50(1)
The Descendants of Krios and Eurybia. Styx and Her Children (lines 375-403)
51(2)
The Descendants of Koios and Phoibe. The Great Goddess Hekate (lines 404-52)
53(3)
The Rise of Zeus
56(5)
The Birth of Zeus and the Other Olympians, the Children of Kronos and Rhea (lines 453-500)
56(4)
Zeus Obtains the Kyklopes' Thunderbolts (lines 501-506)
60(1)
Zeus Outwits Prometheus
61(7)
The Maleficent Sons of Iapetos (lines 507-34)
61(3)
The Creation of Woman (lines 535-616)
64(4)
The War with the Titans
68(6)
Zeus Obtains the Hundred-Handers' Assistance (lines 617-73)
68(3)
The Final Battle (lines 674-721)
71(3)
The Description of the Underworld (lines 722-819)
74(4)
Zeus Defeats His Last Enemy, the Monster Typhoeus (lines 820-80)
78(5)
The Kingship of Zeus and His Marriages (lines 881-929)
83(3)
More Unions of Zeus and Other Gods and Goddesses (lines 930-1022)
86(7)
Works and Days
An Introductory Hymn to Zeus (lines 1-10)
93(1)
The Two Kinds of Eris (lines 11-41)
94(3)
The Prometheus-Pandora Story (lines 42-105)
97(4)
The Story of the Ages of Man (lines 106-202)
101(4)
The Fable of the Hawk and the Nightingale (lines 202-12)
105(1)
An Exhortation to Justice (lines 213-85)
106(5)
An Exhortation to Work (lines 286-319)
111(2)
Advice on Being Successful (lines 320-80)
113(3)
The Farmer's Calendar
116(14)
Introduction (lines 381-413)
116(2)
Autumn (lines 414-92)
118(4)
Winter (lines 493-563)
122(4)
Spring and Summer (lines 564-617)
126(4)
A Guide for the Merchant Sailor. Hesiod's Witness (lines 618-94)
130(5)
Social and Religious Advice (lines 695-764)
135(4)
The Days (lines 765-828)
139(4)
Select Bibliography 143(4)
Index 147


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