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Policy Analysis : Concepts and Practice,9780131090835
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Policy Analysis : Concepts and Practice

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131090835

ISBN10:
0131090836
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $78.00
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Summary

For one-semester, senior/graduate-level courses in Introduction to Policy Analysis, Fundamentals of Public Policy, Policy Analysis, Public Policy, Public Finance, Cost-Benefit Analysis, and Government and Business. This introduction explores both the hows and whys of the practices of public policy. The text provides reality-based practical advice about how to actually conduct policy analysis and demonstrates the application of advanced analytic techniques.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
v(1)
List of Tables
vi(1)
Preface vii(1)
Acknowledgments viii
PART I: INTRODUCTION 1(57)
1 Preview: The Canadian Salmon Fishery
1(26)
Increasing the Social Value of the B.C. Pacific Salmon Fishery
3(23)
Postscript and Prologue
26(1)
2 What is Policy Analysis?
27(16)
Policy Analysis and Related Professions
28(7)
Policy Analysis as a Profession
35(4)
A Closer Look at Analytical Functions
39(2)
Basic Preparation for Policy Analysis
41(2)
3 Toward Professional Ethics
43(15)
Analytical Roles
44(3)
Value Conflicts
47(9)
Ethical Code or Ethos?
56(2)
PART II: CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS 58(195)
4 Efficiency and the Idealized Competitive Model
58(16)
The Efficiency Benchmark: The Competitive Economy
59(2)
Market Efficiency: The Meaning of Social Surplus
61(12)
Conclusion
73(1)
5 Rationales for Public Policy: Market Failures
74(42)
Public Goods
74(20)
Externalities
94(6)
Natural Monopoly
100(7)
Information Asymmetry
107(8)
Conclusion
115(1)
6 Rationales for Public Policy: Other Limitations of the Competitive Framework
116(18)
Thin Markets: Few Sellers or Few Buyers
116(1)
The Source and Acceptability of Preferences
117(4)
The Problem of Uncertainty
121(5)
Intertemporal Allocation: Are Markets Myopic?
126(4)
Adjustment Costs
130(2)
Conclusion
132(2)
7 Rationales for Public Policy: Distributional and Other Goals
134(25)
Social Welfare beyond Pareto Efficiency
134(7)
Substantive Values Other Than Efficiency
141(5)
Instrumental Values
146(4)
Some Cautions in Interpreting Distributional Consequences
150(8)
Conclusion
158(1)
8 Limits to Public Intervention: Government Failures
159(37)
Problems Inherent in Direct Democracy
160(6)
Problems Inherent in Representative Government
166(17)
Problems Inherent in Bureaucratic Supply
183(7)
Problems Inherent in Decentralization
190(5)
Conclusion
195(1)
9 Correcting Market and Government Failures: Generic Policies
196(57)
Freeing, Facilitating, and Simulating Markets
197(8)
Using Subsidies and Taxes to Alter Incentives
205(17)
Establishing Rules
222(13)
Supplying Goods through Nonmarket Mechanisms
235(9)
Providing Insurance and Cushions
244(8)
Conclusion
252(1)
PART III: DOING POLICY ANALYSIS 253(164)
Landing on Your Feet: How to Confront Policy Problems
253(43)
Analyzing Yourself: Meta-Analysis
253(2)
The client Orientation
255(1)
Steps in the Rationalist Mode
256(2)
Problem Analysis
258(17)
Solution Analysis
275(15)
Communicating Analysis
290(4)
Meta-Analysis Once Again: Combining Linear and Nonlinear Approaches
294(1)
Conclusion
295(1)
Appendix 10A: Gathering Information for Policy Analysis
296(15)
Document Research
297(8)
Field Research
305(3)
Putting Document Review and Field Research Together
308(2)
The Most Important Component: Think!
310(1)
Goals/Alternatives Matrices: Some Examples from CBO Studies
311(20)
Setting Out Broad Options: Auctioning Radio Spectrum Licenses
312(3)
Quantitive Predictions: Restructuring the Army
315(5)
Comparing Proposed Alternatives: Launching Digital Television
320(7)
Combining Policy Alternatives: Improving Water Allocation
327(3)
Conclusion
330(1)
12 Benefit-Cost Analysis
331(51)
A Preview: Increasing Alcohol Taxes
332(1)
Identifying Relevant Impacts
333(2)
Monetizing Impacts
335(16)
Discounting for Time and Risk
351(10)
Choosing Among Policies
361(3)
An Illustration: Taxing Alcohol to Save Lives
364(14)
Conclusion
378(1)
Appendix 12A: Measuring Consumer Surplus in the Presence of Income Effects
379(3)
Thinking Strategically About Adoption and Implementation
382(35)
The Adoption Phase
384(12)
The Implementation Phase
396(10)
Thinking More Strategically about Policy design
406(10)
Conclusion
416(1)
PART IV: DOING POLICY ANALYSIS IN ORGANIZATIONAL SETTINGS 417(52)
14 Benefit-Cost Analysis in a Bureaucratic Setting: The Strategic Petroleum Reserve
417(26)
Background: Energy Security and the SPR
418(5)
Analytical Approaches to the Size Issue
423(12)
The Role of Analysis in the SPR Size Controversy
435(7)
Conclusion
442(1)
When Statistics Count: Revising the Lead Standard for Gasoline
443(26)
Background: The EPA Lead Standards
444(2)
Origins of the 1985 Standards
446(1)
Pulling the Pieces Together
447(4)
A Closer Look at the Link between Gasoline Lead and Blood Lead
451(13)
Finalizing the Rule
464(3)
Conclusion
467(2)
PART V: CONCLUSION 469(2)
Doing Well and Doing Good
469(2)
Name Index 471(6)
Subject Index 477


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