CART

(0) items

Political Writings : John Locke

by ;
ISBN13:

9780872206762

ISBN10:
0872206769
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Hackett Pub Co Inc
List Price: $15.00

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$8.25

Buy New Textbook

Usually Ships in 3-5 Business Days
N9780872206762
$14.63

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $21.75
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 3/1/2003.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

John Locke's 'Second Treatise of Government' (c1681) is perhaps the key founding liberal text. 'A Letter Concerning Toleration', written in 1685 (a year when a Catholic monarch came to the throne of England and Louis XVI unleashed a reign of terror against Protestants in France), is a classic defence of religious freedom. Yet many of Locke's other writings -- not least the 'Constitutions of Carolina', which he helped draft -- are almost defiantly anti-liberal in outlook. This comprehensive collection brings together the main published works (excluding polemical attacks on other people's views) with the most important surviving evidence from among Locke's papers relating to his political philosophy. David Wootton's wide-ranging and scholarly Introduction sets the writings in the context of their time, examines Locke's developing ideas and unorthodox Christianity, and analyses his main arguments. The result is the first fully rounded picture of Locke's political thought in his own words.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements viii
Preface 1(6)
Introduction 7(1)
Locke's liberalism
7(9)
Locke's life
16(10)
Locke before Shaftesbury
26(10)
Locke and Shaftesbury
36(13)
Locke and Tyrrell
49(15)
The First Treatise of Government
64(13)
The Second Treatise of Government
77(12)
Interlude: Seeds and trees, locks and ciphers
89(5)
A Letter Concerning Toleration
94(16)
Some more equal than others?
110(9)
Notes
119(4)
Suggestions for Further Reading
123(8)
A Note on the Texts
131(6)
Letter to S.H. [Henry Stubbe] (mid-September? 1659; published 1967)
137(2)
Letter to Tom (20 October 1659; published 1976)
139(2)
From: `Question: Whether the civil magistrate may lawfully impose and determine the use of indifferent things in reference to religious worship. Answer: Yes' (First Tract on Government, 1660; published 1961)
141(5)
`Preface to the Reader' from the First Tract on Government (1661; published 1961)
146(6)
`Question: Can the civil magistrate specify indifferent things to be included within the order of divine worship, and impose them upon the people? Answer: Yes' (Second Tract on Government, c. 1662; published 1961). Translated from the Latin
152(25)
`Question: Is each man's private interest the foundation of the law of nature? Answer: No' (Essays on the Law of Nature, No. VIII, 1664; published 1954). Translated from the Latin
177(7)
Letter to the Hon. Robert Boyle (12/22 December 1665; published 1744)
184(2)
An Essay Concerning Toleration (1667; published 1876)
186(24)
The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina (1669; published c.1670)
210(22)
`Philanthropy, or The Christian Philosophers' (1675; published 1972)
232(2)
`Obligation of Penal Laws' (Journal, 25 February 1676; published 1829)
234(2)
`Law' (Journal, 21 April 1678; published 1829)
236(1)
`Credit, Disgrace' (Journal, 12 December 1678; published 1829)
236(1)
`The Idea We Have of God' (Journal, 1 August 1680; published 1829)
237(1)
`Inspiration' (Journal, 3 April 1681; published 1829)
238(2)
`Virtus' (1681; from the 1661 Commonplace Book; published 1829)
240(2)
From The First Treatise of Government (c. 1681, published 1689)
242(17)
Chapter Five: Of Adam's Title to Sovereignty by the Subjection of Eve
242(7)
Chapter Nine: Of Monarchy by Inheritance from Adam
249(10)
`Two Sorts of Knowledge' (Journal, 26 June 1681; published 1829)
259(2)
The Second Treatise of Government (c. 1681, published 1689)
261(126)
Chapter One:
261(1)
Chapter Two: Of the State of Nature
262(7)
Chapter Three: Of the State of War
269(3)
Chapter Four: Of Slavery
272(1)
Chapter Five: Of Property
273(13)
Chapter Six: Of Paternal Power
286(14)
Chapter Seven: Of Political or Civil Society
300(9)
Chapter Eight: Of the Beginning of Political Societies
309(15)
Chapter Nine: Of the Ends of Political Society and Government
324(3)
Chapter Ten: Of the Forms of a Commonwealth
327(1)
Chapter Eleven: Of the Extent of the Legislative Power
328(7)
Chapter Twelve: Of the Legislative, Executive, and Federative Power of the Commonwealth
335(2)
Chapter Thirteen: Of the Subordination of the Powers of the Commonwealth
337(7)
Chapter Fourteen: Of Prerogative
344(5)
Chapter Fifteen: Of Paternal, Political, and Despotical Power Considered Together
349(3)
Chapter Sixteen: Of Conquest
352(10)
Chapter Seventeen: Of Usurpation
362(1)
Chapter Eighteen: Of Tyranny
363(6)
Chapter Nineteen: Of the Dissolution of Government
369(18)
Letter to Edward Clarke (27 January/6 February 1685; published 1927)
387(3)
A Letter Concerning Toleration, trans. William Popple (1685; published 1689)
390(46)
Letter to Edward Clarke (29 January/8 February 1689; published 1927)
436(2)
Preface to Two Treatises of Government (written and published 1689)
438(2)
`Labour' (1693; from the 1661 Commonplace Book; published 1991)
440(2)
`Venditio' (1695; from the 1661 Commonplace Book; published 1968)
442(4)
Draft of a Representation Containing a Scheme of Methods for the Employment of the Poor. Proposed by Mr Locke, the 26th October 1697 (published 1789)
446(16)
Bibliography 462(9)
Index 471


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...