9780333948064

Postrevolutionary Europe 1815-1856

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780333948064

  • ISBN10:

    0333948068

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-04-16
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

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Summary

Martyn Lyons re-assesses European history between the fall of Napoleon and the Crimean War. Refusing to characterize the period as a "Restoration." Lyons presents the struggle of the European monarchies for credibility in the wake of conflicts which had shattered the mystique of kingship. Lyons stresses the invented aspects of emerging nationalism, as well as the important process of rebuilding a political culture after 1815, and the democratic Revolutions of 1848.

Author Biography

Martyn Lyons is a Professor in History and European Studies at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
ix
List of Maps and Tables
x
Abbreviations xi
Acknowledgements xii
Introduction: Rethinking Post-Revolutionary Europe 1(4)
Endings and Beginnings: Europe in 1815
5(17)
1814--1815: the end of Napoleonic hegemony in Europe
5(1)
Problems of post-revolutionary transition
6(4)
`Redemptive' and `integrationist' transitions
10(2)
The Congress of Vienna, 1815
12(1)
Europe's `French problem'
13(2)
Italy, Germany and Central Europe
15(3)
A framework for international co-operation
18(2)
An evaluation of the Congress of Vienna
20(2)
Re-Inventing the Monarchy: France, 1814--1830
22(16)
Continuity and rupture
22(2)
The impact of the Hundred Days
24(2)
The White Terror and ultra-royalism
26(3)
The crisis of legitimacy
29(5)
An alternative style of monarchy
34(2)
Conclusion
36(2)
Conservatism and Political Repression, 1815--1830
38(18)
Metternich and conservatism
38(2)
Metternich's policy in Germany
40(2)
Metternich's policy in Italy
42(3)
The `movements' of 1820--1821 in Italy, Spain and Portugal
45(3)
Threats of revolution in Britain, 1817--1820
48(3)
Revolution and repression in Russia
51(3)
Conclusion
54(2)
The Underground Republic: Opposition Movements 1815--48
56(20)
The four sergeants of La Rochelle
56(1)
The frustrations of youth
57(1)
Carbonari and secret societies
58(2)
Bonapartism in France
60(3)
Republicanism in France
63(3)
The barricade
66(2)
Utopian socialism and the `social question'
68(7)
Afterword
75(1)
The Fragility of Nationalism
76(22)
The fragility of nationalism
76(5)
Imagined communities in the Habsburg Empire
81(3)
Italy - Mazzinianism
84(1)
Germany - the Burschenschaften
85(1)
Germany - the Zollverein
86(4)
The War of Greek Independence, 1821--1829
90(6)
Conclusion
96(2)
The Revolutions of 1830
98(15)
Introduction
98(1)
France: the July Revolution
99(4)
Britain: the crisis of parliamentary reform, 1831--1832
103(3)
Germany and Switzerland: the `regeneration' of the cantons
106(1)
Southern Europe: liberalism and clericalism
107(1)
The Netherlands: Belgian Independence
108(1)
Poland: the `November Rising' of 1830
109(2)
Conclusion
111(2)
The Rise of Public Opinion
113(15)
The revival of a public sphere
113(1)
The `conspiracy in broad daylight'
114(4)
Forms of political action
118(2)
The gendering of the public sphere
120(3)
Public opinion mobilized in Germany
123(1)
Public opinion mobilized in Britain and France
124(2)
Conclusion
126(2)
The `Juste Milieu' and Gathering Unrest, 1830--1848
128(14)
Introduction: threats to the `happy medium'
128(1)
The July Monarchy and the search for legitimacy
129(1)
The juste milieu
129(3)
Italy -- the modernization of Piedmont
132(1)
Liberal Spain
133(2)
Britain -- Peel and Chartism
135(3)
Pio Nono
138(2)
Conclusion
140(2)
The Jews: The Dilemmas of Emancipation
142(19)
Introduction: the Mortara Affair, 1858
142(1)
Before emancipation
143(2)
The process of emancipation in Western Europe
145(1)
The status of Jews in Western and Central Europe
146(4)
Jews in Eastern Europe
150(3)
Jewish assimilation and Jewish identity
153(2)
The case of the Rothschilds
155(3)
Jew-hatred traditional and modern
158(1)
Conclusion
159(2)
The City
161(14)
Introduction: what made Dostoevsky nervous
161(1)
Urban demography
162(3)
Urban poverty
165(3)
Was the city sick?
168(3)
Cholera
171(2)
Conclusion: varieties of urban life
173(2)
The Peasant World
175(13)
Introduction: a gradual expansion
175(1)
A world of peasants
175(5)
Economic change in the countryside
180(3)
The consequences of agrarian change
183(2)
Russia
185(1)
Conclusion
186(2)
The Crisis of the Artisans
188(9)
Industry without factories
188(2)
Threats to artisan production
190(2)
The social basis of popular politics
192(3)
Conclusion
195(2)
Bourgeois Culture and the Domestic Ideology
197(17)
In search of the bourgeoisie
197(2)
Bourgeois wealth, bourgeois values, bourgeois leisure
199(2)
The domestic ideology
201(6)
Divorce
207(3)
Challenges to conventional gender expectations
210(2)
Conclusions
212(2)
The Revolutions of 1848
214(24)
Introduction: romantic failure or apprenticeship in democracy?
214(4)
The Revolution of 1848 in France (1848--1852)
218(4)
The Revolutions of 1848 in Germany
222(5)
The Revolutions of 1848 in the Habsburg Empire
227(4)
The Revolutions of 1848 in Italy
231(4)
Conclusion and interpretations
235(3)
The Crimean War and Beyond
238(13)
Politics after 1848
238(1)
The Eastern Question and the Crimean War, 1853--1856
238(8)
Conclusion: 1856 as a turning-point
246(2)
Afterword Europe overseas
248(3)
Notes 251(24)
Recommended Further Reading 275(12)
Index 287

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