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Power & Choice: An Introduction to Political Science with Powerweb; MP,9780072535389
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Power & Choice: An Introduction to Political Science with Powerweb; MP

by
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780072535389

ISBN10:
0072535385
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
5/3/2002
Publisher(s):
MCG (Manual)
List Price: $93.40

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This is the 8th edition with a publication date of 5/3/2002.
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Summary

As a concise introduction to politics, Power and Choice has a comparative perspective, analyzing governmental structures around the world. The text includes country studies, a glossary, and web links to sites on the Internet for each chapter and access to PowerWeb for Political Science.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
PART I INTRODUCTION
Politics: Setting the Stage
2(16)
Politics
3(1)
Politics as the Making of Common Decisions
4(1)
Politics as the Exercise of Power
5(1)
Implicit and Manifest Power
6(3)
Politics and Power
9(1)
Power and Choice
9(3)
Politics of the State
12(1)
Political Science
13(2)
The Pleasures of Politics
15(3)
Modern Ideologies and Political Philosophy
18(22)
American Ideologies
19(2)
Liberalism
21(3)
The Conservative Reaction
24(3)
The Socialist Alternative
27(4)
Communism and Socialism
31(1)
Fascism
31(1)
The Great Ideologies in the Late Twentieth Century
32(2)
Political Philosophy in Other Historical Eras
34(6)
PART II THE STATE AND PUBLIC POLICY
The Modem State
40(30)
The Development of the Modern State
42(3)
The Origin of States
45(1)
``State,'' ``Nation,'' and the ``Nation-State''
46(5)
Government and the State
51(3)
Challenges to the State
54(2)
Are States Losing Their Ability to Make Economic Policy?
56(2)
Some Possible Alternatives
58(2)
The West, the East, and the South
60(10)
Example: State Building in Nigeria
62(2)
Example: State Building in the European Union
64(6)
Policies of the State
70(24)
What do Governments do?
74(3)
Defense Policy
77(2)
Education
79(1)
Research and Development
80(2)
Health and Social Welfare
82(3)
Democracy and Public Policy
85(1)
The Place of Power in Policy Analysis
85(9)
Example: Norway's Program to Encourage Norwegian-Language Publications
86(1)
Example: Economic Development Compared With ``Human Development''
87(2)
Example: Effectiveness of Educational Policies
89(5)
Political Economy of the State
94(31)
Political Economy
95(1)
Economic Policy I: Economic Growth
96(6)
Economic Policy II: Controlling Inflation and Unemployment
102(4)
Economic Policy III: Managing Distribution to Address Inequality
106(2)
Independent Central Banks
108(3)
Corruption
111(4)
Conclusion
115(10)
Example: Political Economy of Germany
116(3)
Example: Political Economy of Indonesia
119(6)
Political Choices: The Problems of Justice and Efficiency
125(21)
The Problem of Justice
125(3)
Other Aspects of Justice: Procedural Justice
128(3)
Efficiency
131(3)
Modes of Decision: Incremental Versus Radical
134(1)
Modes of Decision: Authority Versus. The Market
135(6)
Conclusion
141(5)
Example: Political Choice
141(5)
PART III THE CITIZEN AND THE REGIME
Authority and Legitimacy: the State and the Citizen
146(23)
Legitimacy and Authority
148(1)
Sources of Legitimacy
148(3)
The ``Democratic Citizen''
151(2)
How well are These Requirements Met?
153(4)
Social Capital
157(1)
Political Culture
158(2)
Political Socialization
160(9)
Example: Building Authority and Legitimacy in West Germany After World War II
162(3)
Example: Declining Democratic Legitimacy in the United States
165(4)
Democracy and its Recent Surge in the World
169(17)
The Wave of Democratization in the 1980s and 1990s
170(1)
Possible Explanations
171(1)
The End of History?
172(2)
What Have we Learned?
174(12)
Example: Democratization in Spain
179(1)
Example: Fragile Democratization in Peru
180(6)
Autocratic Government
186(18)
Military Government
188(3)
Why Aren't There More Military Governments?
191(1)
One-Party States
192(2)
``Court'' Politics
194(1)
``Power and Choice'' Again
195(1)
Conclusion
195(9)
Example: Civilian Participation in Nigeria's First Military Regime
196(1)
Example: ``Court'' Politics in Nazi Germany
197(7)
PART IV THE APPARATUS OF GOVERNANCE
Constitutions and the Design of Government
204(19)
Variations in Formality
205(1)
The Virtue of Vagueness
205(1)
Other Principles of Constitutional Design
206(4)
The Geographic Concentration of Power
210(1)
``Federal'' And ``Unitary'' States
211(2)
The Distinction Between ``Unitary'' and ``Centralized'' States
213(2)
How Much Centralization is Good?
215(1)
``Constitutionalism''
215(8)
Example: Constitutional Government in Great Britain
217(3)
Example: Constitutional Government in Russia
220(3)
Elections
223(21)
Elections as a Means of Building Support
223(4)
Elections as a Means of Selecting Leaders and Policies
227(1)
Electoral Systems
227(5)
Referendums
232(1)
Electoral Participation
232(2)
The Paradox of Participation
234(2)
The Bases of Individuals' Electoral Choices
236(8)
Example: Proportional Representation Elections in Israel
239(2)
Example: Elections in Nigeria
241(3)
Parties: A Linking and Leading Mechanism in Politics
244(24)
The Political Party
244(1)
Origins of the Modern Party
245(1)
Political Parties and the Mobilization of the Masses
246(1)
Political Parties and the Recruitment and Socialization of Leaders
247(2)
Political Parties as a Source of Political Identity
249(3)
Political Parties as a Channel of Control
252(1)
Party Organization
253(1)
Party Finance
254(1)
Political Party Systems
255(5)
Conclusion
260(8)
Example: The Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1917-1991)
261(2)
Example: Mexico's Dominant Party System
263(5)
Structured Conflict: Interest Groups and Politics
268(28)
Interest Groups and Representation
270(6)
Types of Interest Groups
276(2)
Tactics of Interest Groups
278(5)
Social Movements
283(1)
Patterns of Organized Interest group Activity
284(1)
Pluralism
285(1)
Neocorporatism
286(2)
Power and Choice
288(8)
Example: Interest Groups in France
288(3)
Example: Interest Groups in Japan: Attenuated Neocorporatism
291(5)
National Decision-Making Institutions: Parliamentary Government
296(20)
Cabinet Control
298(1)
What Does a Parliament do?
299(3)
The Life of a Member of Parliament
302(1)
Parliamentary Committees
303(2)
Exceptions to Parliamentary Supremacy
305(1)
Parliaments in Autocratic Systems
305(1)
Conclusion
306(10)
Example: Parliamentary Government in India
307(4)
Example: Parliamentary Government in Germany
311(5)
National Decision-Making Institutions: Presidential Government
316(22)
Presidential and Parliamentary Systems Compared
318(1)
Responsibility for Policy
319(1)
Presidential Systems and Comprehensive Policy
320(1)
Recruitment of Executive Leaders
320(2)
Review and Control of the Executive
322(1)
The Split Executive of Parliamentary Systems
323(2)
Why Aren't All Democracies Parliamentary Systems?
325(1)
Constitutional Review and the Fragmentation of Power
326(3)
A Note on Constitutions and Power
329(9)
Example: Presidential Government in France
331(3)
Example: Presidential Government in Mexico
334(4)
Bureaucracy and the Public Sector
338(17)
Public Administration as a Political Problem
339(2)
Characteristics of Good Public Administration
341(1)
``Bureaucracy'': A Reform of the Nineteenth Century
342(1)
Bureaucracy Versus Flexibility
343(1)
The Problem of Protected Incompetence
344(1)
Adjustments to Bureaucracy
345(2)
Social Representativeness of Public Administration
347(1)
Conclusion
348(7)
Example: The French Bureaucracy
349(1)
Example: The Saudi Arabian Bureaucracy
350(2)
Example: Battling the Bureaucracy in Brazil
352(3)
Law and the Courts
355(17)
Anglo-Saxon Case Law
355(1)
Continental European Code Law
356(2)
Religious Law: the Sharia
358(2)
The Blending of Case Law and Code Law
360(1)
Courts
361(2)
Conclusion
363(9)
Example: The Law in China
363(3)
Example: The European Court of Justice
366(6)
PART V INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
Global Politics: Politics Among States (and Others)
372(29)
The Evolution of the International System Since World War II
372(2)
The New World Order
374(7)
International Politics
381(1)
The Absence of Central Authority
382(1)
Fiduciary Political Roles and International Morality
383(2)
Impediments to International Communication
385(1)
Power and International Politics
385(3)
The Process of International Politics
388(4)
Power and Choice in International Politics
392(1)
Conclusion
393(6)
Example: A Failure of the New Order: Ethnic Conflict in Rwanda
394(3)
Example: The United Nations
397(2)
A Personal Note
399(2)
Appendix: Principles of Political Analysis 401(8)
Falsifiability
401(1)
What Makes a Statement Interesting?
402(1)
Causation and Explanation
403(2)
Historical Explanation
405(1)
A Few Common Pitfalls in Analysis
406(3)
Glossary 409(10)
Bibliography 419(20)
Index 439


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