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Powerful Social Studies For Elementary Students,9780534555450
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Powerful Social Studies For Elementary Students

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780534555450

ISBN10:
0534555454
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
5/4/2006
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 5/4/2006.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

Ideal for pre-service and in-service teachers, POWERFUL SOCIAL STUDIES FOR ELEMENTARY STUDENTS outlines ways to select content and teach history, geography, and social sciences more meaningfully. Hone skills in planning well-organized social studies instruction that produces positive student outcomes using developmentally appropriate content and methods to help your students develop social understanding and civic action. Rather than advocating the elimination of the traditional content framework used to organize the social studies curriculum ('expanding communities framework'), the authors call for retaining the most important topics that have traditionally been emphasized and for teaching these topics in 'more coherent and powerful ways.'

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Elementary Social Studies: What Is It? What Might It Become?
1(20)
Competing Visions of Social Studies as Citizen Education
4(4)
Curricular Tensions That Cut across Subjects
5(1)
Competing Approaches to Social Studies
5(2)
Competition for Curriculum Space among Interest Groups within Social Studies
7(1)
The Expanding Communities Framework
8(2)
Dissatisfaction with the Textbook Series
10(1)
Reforms Suggested by Others
11(2)
Cultural Literacy/Core Knowledge
11(1)
History/Literature Focus
11(2)
Issues Analysis
13(1)
The Approach That We Recommend: Overview
13(1)
Shifting Emphasis from the Expanding Communities Sequence to Developing Basic Understandings about the Human Condition
14(2)
Human Activities Related to Cultural Universals as Core Content
14(1)
Revised Rationale for This Core Content
15(1)
Focus on Powerful Ideas
16(2)
Summary
18(1)
Reflective Questions
18(1)
Your Turn: What Is Social Studies?
19(2)
How Can I Build a Learning Community in My Classroom?
21(26)
A Scenario
22(1)
Launching a Learning Community
23(3)
Productive Communication and Interaction Patterns
24(1)
Four Steps for Creating a Learning Community
25(1)
A Childhood Unit as Your Content Vehicle
26(4)
Cooperative Learning in a Community Setting
30(3)
Task Structures
30(1)
Cooperative Learning Techniques
31(2)
Motivating Students to Learn
33(7)
The Expectancy Side of Motivation
33(2)
The Value Side of Motivation
35(5)
The Social Context's Effects on Motivation
40(1)
Embracing Cultural Diversity
40(3)
The Teacher's Role
42(1)
Conclusion
43(1)
Summary
43(1)
Reflective Questions
44(1)
Your Turn: Building a Learning Community in Your Classroom
44(3)
Sample Observation Schedule
45(2)
What Does Goal-Oriented Instruction Entail?
47(13)
Generic Subject-Matter Goals: Understanding, Appreciation, and Life Application
49(2)
Research on Teaching for Understanding
50(1)
Social Studies Goals: Social Understanding and Civic Efficacy
51(3)
Planning Goal-Oriented Topical Units
54(3)
Advantages of Topical Units
56(1)
Planning Tool
57(1)
Summary
57(1)
Reflective Questions
58(1)
Your Turn: Goal-Oriented Curriculum Planning
58(1)
Goal-Oriented Planning Guide
59(1)
What Do Selecting and Representing Content Entail?
60(22)
Goal-Oriented Development of Powerful Ideas
62(16)
Summary
78(1)
Reflective Questions
79(1)
Your Turn: Selecting and Representing Content
79(3)
How Can I Teach History Content More Meaningfully?
82(32)
A Perspective on the Relationship between Elementary Social Studies and Its Foundational Disciplines
83(3)
History
86(22)
History in Elementary Social Studies
86(2)
Developments in Children's History Knowledge
88(5)
Problems with History Texts and Teaching
93(2)
National Standards for History Teaching
95(3)
NCSS Standards Relating to History
98(1)
Other Guidelines for Teaching History
99(2)
Teaching History for Understanding, Appreciation, and Life Application
101(2)
Using Children's Literature to Teach History
103(2)
Using Timelines
105(1)
Teaching with Artifacts and Historical Source Material
106(1)
Conclusion
107(1)
Summary
108(1)
Reflective Questions
109(1)
Your Turn: History in the Intermediate Grades
109(3)
Sample Interview Questions
110(2)
Your Turn: A Resource Unit for Fifth-Grade U.S. History: The American Revolution (Appendix A)
112(2)
Portfolio Suggestions for the American Revolution Unit
112(2)
How Can I Teach Geography and Anthropology Content More Meaningfully?
114(24)
Geography
115(12)
Geography in the Elementary Grades
116(1)
Developments in Geographic Knowledge
116(2)
Problems with Geography Texts and Teaching
118(1)
The Five Fundamental Themes
119(3)
The National Geography Standards
122(1)
NCSS Standards Relating to Geography
122(2)
Using the Five Themes in Your Teaching
124(3)
Anthropology
127(5)
NCSS Standards Relating to Anthropology
128(1)
Guidelines for Teaching Anthropology
129(3)
Summary
132(1)
Reflective Questions
133(1)
Your Turn: Geography
133(2)
Sample Interview Schedule Questions
134(1)
Your Turn: A Resource Unit on Mountain Regions
135(1)
Your Turn: Enriching Your Units with Social Science Content
135(3)
Example
136(2)
How Can I Teach the Other Social Science Content More Meaningfully?
138(33)
Psychology
140(3)
NCSS Standards Relating to Psychology
141(1)
Guidelines for Teaching Psychology
141(2)
Sociology
143(3)
Children's Knowledge and Thinking about Sociology
143(1)
NCSS Standards Relating to Sociology
144(1)
Teaching Sociological Content
145(1)
Economics
146(10)
Children's Knowledge and Thinking about Economics
147(2)
Key Economic Concepts for the Elementary Grades
149(2)
National Standards for Economics Teaching
151(2)
Teaching about Economics
153(1)
Economics Programs for the Elementary Grades
154(2)
Financial Literacy
156(1)
Civics and Government
156(10)
Children's Knowledge and Thinking about Government
157(3)
National Standards for Teaching about Civics and Government
160(1)
Teaching about Civics and Government
161(5)
Embedding Social Science Content within Global and Multicultural Perspectives
166(1)
Summary
167(1)
Reflective Questions
168(1)
Your Turn: Applying Social Science Concepts within Your Learning Community
169(2)
NCSS Strands
169(2)
How Can I Structure Classroom Discourse to Help Students Develop Social Studies Understanding?
171(17)
Knowledge Construction
173(3)
Active Construction of Meaning
173(1)
Conceptual Change
174(1)
Socially Constructed Knowledge
174(2)
The Need to Build a Content Base
176(2)
Narrative Structures as Teaching Tools
178(2)
Teaching for Thoughtfulness
180(2)
Elementary Grades
182(1)
Engaging Students in Reflective Discourse about Powerful Ideas
182(3)
Summary
185(1)
Reflective Questions
185(1)
Your Turn: Developing Content through Classroom Discourse
186(2)
How Can I Design, Implement, and Evaluate Instructional Activities?
188(21)
The Nature and Functions of Learning Activities
192(1)
Basic Assumptions about Ideal Curricula
193(2)
Principles for Designing or Selecting Activities
195(5)
Primary Principles That Apply to Each Individual Activity
195(2)
Secondary Principles That Apply to Each Individual Activity
197(2)
Principles That Apply to Sets of Activities
199(1)
Principles for Implementing Activities with Students
200(2)
Extending the Curriculum through Out-of-School Learning Experiences
202(1)
College Students' Reports of Learning Activities Experienced in Elementary Social Studies
203(1)
NCSS Position on Powerful Teaching and Learning
204(1)
Summary
205(1)
Reflective Questions
205(1)
Your Turn: Learning Activities
206(3)
Unit Goals
206(1)
Possible Activity Selections
206(3)
What Are Some Other Strategies for Teaching Social Studies?
209(20)
Storytelling
212(1)
Visuals
213(1)
Primary Historical Sources
213(1)
Artifacts
214(1)
Computers
215(1)
The Arts
215(2)
Visual Art
216(1)
Music
216(1)
Children's Literature
216(1)
Creative Dramatics
217(4)
Dramatic Play
218(1)
Role-Play
218(1)
Simulations
219(1)
Mock Trials
220(1)
Co-Constructing Learning Resources
221(1)
Field Trips
222(1)
Case Method
223(1)
Debate
224(1)
Inquiry
225(1)
Summary
226(1)
Reflective Questions
227(1)
Your Turn: Strategies for Teaching Elementary Social Studies
228(1)
What Is the Role of Curricular Integration?
229(12)
Desirable Integration
230(1)
Accountability Considerations
231(1)
Examples of Appropriate Integrative Activities
231(3)
Integrative Activities That Focus on Topics That Draw Content from More Than One Subject
232(1)
Integrative Activities in Which Skills Learned in One Subject Are Used to Process or Apply Knowledge Learned in Another
232(1)
Enrichment Activities That Help to Personalize Content, Make It More Concrete, Enhance Learner Curiosity, or Add an Important Affective Perspective
233(1)
Undesirable Integration
234(3)
Activities That Lack or Mask Social Education Goals
234(1)
Cost-Effectiveness Problems
234(1)
Content Distortion
235(1)
Difficult or Impossible Tasks
236(1)
Feasibility Problems
236(1)
Conclusion
237(1)
Summary
237(1)
Reflective Questions
238(1)
Your Turn: Integrating Social Studies within the Total Curriculum
238(3)
Unit Goals
239(1)
Possible Activity Selections
239(2)
How Can I Assess Student Learning?
241(23)
The Present: A Broader View of Assessment and Evaluation
242(1)
Authentic Assessment
242(1)
Preliminary Assessment
243(1)
Formative and Summative Assessment
244(1)
Assessment Tools
244(5)
Multiple-Choice Items
244(1)
True-False and Yes-No Items
245(1)
Short Answer and Completion Items
246(1)
Matching Items
247(1)
Essay Questions
247(2)
Informal Assessment
249(2)
Participation in Discussions
249(1)
Engagement and Online Understanding
249(2)
Assessing Attitudes, Values, and Dispositions
251(1)
Performance Assessment: The Laboratory Model
252(4)
Portfolio Assessment
256(2)
Student-Led Parent Conferences
257(1)
Conclusion
257(1)
Summary
258(1)
Reflective Questions
258(1)
Your Turn: Evaluation
259(1)
Your Turn: Using NCSS Strands and Performance Indicators
260(4)
How Can the Curriculum Be Expanded and Made More Meaningful through Home-School Connections?
264(14)
Principles for Designing and Implementing Out-of-School Learning Activities
266(1)
Purposes and Functions of Home Assignments
266(8)
Provide for Expanded Meaningfulness and Life Application of School Learning
267(1)
Constructing Meaning in Natural Ways and Engendering a Sense of Self-Efficacy
267(1)
Extending Social Studies Education to the Home and Community by Involving Adults in Interesting and Responsible Ways
268(2)
Taking Advantage of the Students' Diversity by Using It as a Learning Resource
270(2)
Personalizing the Curriculum and Reflecting on the Here and Now
272(1)
Exploiting Learning Opportunities That Are Not Cost Effective on School Time
272(1)
Keeping the Curriculum Up to Date
273(1)
Teacher and Parent Involvement
273(1)
Guidelines for Framing Out-of-School Learning Opportunities
274(1)
Summary
275(1)
Reflective Questions
276(1)
Your Turn: Incorporating Out-of-School Learning
276(2)
What Social Studies Planning Tools Are Available?
278(23)
Planning as Goal Oriented
279(1)
Long-Range Planning
279(1)
Unit Planning
280(1)
Weekly and Daily Planning
281(1)
Introduction to Planning Tools
281(1)
NCSS Standards
282(8)
NCSS Guidelines for Social Studies Teaching and Learning
282(3)
State Social Studies Standards
285(1)
Local Curriculum Guides
285(1)
Textbooks
286(3)
Technology
289(1)
Children's Literature
289(1)
Frequently Asked Questions
290(8)
Summary
298(1)
Reflective Questions
298(1)
Your Turn: Planning Your Social Studies Program for the Year
299(2)
What Is the Research Base That Informs Ideas about Powerful Social Studies Teaching?
301(23)
The Current High-Stakes Testing Environment
302(1)
So What Can You Do in the Meantime?
303(2)
Content
304(1)
Time Allocation
304(1)
Testing
304(1)
Quality of Curriculum and Instruction
305(1)
How Some Teachers Have Coped
305(1)
A Synthesis of Generic Principles of Good Teaching
306(1)
Introduction to the Twelve Principles
307(1)
The Twelve Principles
308(14)
Supportive Classroom Climate
308(1)
Opportunity to Learn
309(1)
Curricular Alignment
310(2)
Establishing Learning Orientations
312(1)
Coherent Content
313(1)
Thoughtful Discourse
314(1)
Practice and Application Activities
315(1)
Scaffolding Students' Task Engagement
316(1)
Strategy Teaching
317(2)
Cooperative Learning
319(1)
Goal-Oriented Assessment
320(1)
Achievement Expectations
321(1)
Conclusion
322(1)
Summary
323(1)
Appendix A: A Resource Unit for Fifth-Grade U.S. History: The American Revolution 324(5)
Appendix B: A Resource Unit on Mountains 329(4)
Appendix C: Planning Tool 333(6)
References 339(10)
Index 349


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