9780881338539

A Practical Approach to Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780881338539

  • ISBN10:

    0881338532

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1995-03-01
  • Publisher: Waveland Pr Inc

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Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Introduction
1(22)
Doctrine of the Affections
2(1)
Texture
2(1)
Aspects of Formal Construction
3(1)
Performance Practice and Musical Editions
3(1)
Thoroughbass
4(3)
The Major-Minor Modes and their Diatonic Scale Degrees
7(2)
Diatonic Chords and their Harmonic Function
9(2)
Non-Diatonic Scale Degrees and Chords
11(1)
Modulation
12(1)
Cadential Formulas
13(2)
Sequential Patterns
15(8)
Melody
23(10)
Tempo, Meter, and Phrasing
23(2)
Vocal/Instrumental Cross Influence
25(1)
Technical Features of Baroque Melody
26(7)
General Characteristics of Counterpoint; Pedagogical Foundations
33(8)
Pedagogical Foundations of Baroque Polyphony
35(6)
Two-Voice Note-Against-Note Counterpoint
41(16)
Typical Melodic Problems in the Counterpointing Voice
42(1)
Harmonic Intervals
43(2)
Melodic Motion between Consecutive Harmonic Intervals
45(2)
Harmonic Implications
47(4)
Voice-Leading Reduction
51(2)
Chordal Dissonance
53(1)
Tonicization and Modulation within the Phrase
54(3)
Simple Diminution; 2:1 Elaboration of the Counterpointing Voice
57(12)
Diminution with Consonant Intervals
58(3)
Diminution with Dissonant Intervals
61(5)
Suspensions in Simple Diminution
66(1)
Chordal Dissonance in Simple Diminution
67(2)
Further Rhythmic Diminution; Two-Voice Chorale Preludes
69(14)
Further Contrapuntal Diminution
69(6)
The Two-Voice Chorale Prelude
75(1)
Compositional Unification in the Chorale Prelude
75(8)
Free Counterpoint; Simple Two-Reprise Form
83(13)
Simple Two-Reprise Form
85(11)
Further Diminution Techniques in Two-Voice Texture
96(11)
Figuration Preludes
102(5)
Real Imitation and Double Counterpoint
107(10)
Real Imitation at the Octave and Fifth
107(6)
Double Counterpoint at the Octave
113(4)
The Two-Part Canon and Invention
117(14)
Two-Part Canon
117(5)
The Two-Part Invention
122(9)
Introduction to Three-Voice Texture; Note-Against-Note and Simple Dimunition
131(10)
Note-Against-Note with Consonance only
131(4)
Note-Against-Note with Chordal Dissonance
135(2)
Simple 2:1 Elaboration in Three Voices
137(4)
Further Rhythmic Diminution; Three-Voice Chorale Preludes
141(14)
Further Rhythmic Diminution
141(3)
Three-Voice Chorale Preludes
144(11)
Chromaticism
155(12)
Non-Structural Chromaticism in the Major Mode
157(2)
Non-Structural Chromaticism in the Minor Mode
159(3)
Structural Chromaticism
162(5)
Free Counterpoint in Three Voices; Extended Two-Reprise Forms
167(10)
Free Counterpoint in Three-Voice Texture
167(3)
The Baroque Suite
170(4)
Extended Two-Reprise Forms
174(3)
Tonal Imitation; Further Studies in Invertible Counterpoint
177(17)
Tonal Imitation
177(9)
Double Counterpoint at the Tenth and Twelfth
186(3)
Triple Counterpoint
189(5)
Additional Contrapuntal Devices; Further Study of Canon
194(15)
Melodic Mirror
194(3)
Stretto
197(3)
Augmentation and Diminution
200(2)
Additional Study in Canon
202(7)
The Three-Voice Fugue
209(20)
Historical Background
209(1)
The Fugues of J.S. Bach
210(1)
The Exposition
211(6)
The Counter-Exposition
217(1)
Reentries of the Subject
218(1)
Episodes
219(3)
Contrapuntal Devices
222(1)
The Overall Structure of the Fugue
223(6)
Introduction to Four-Voice Texture; Further Study in Chorale Prelude
229(15)
Contrapuntal Diminution of Note-Against-Note Settings
229(5)
The Four-Voice Chorale Prelude
234(6)
Free Four-Voice Counterpoint
240(4)
Variations
244(16)
Historical Background
244(1)
Continuous Variations
245(11)
Theme and Variations
256(4)
Further Studies in Fugue
260(16)
The Four-Voice Fugue
260(5)
The Larger Organ Fugue
265(1)
The Double Fugue
266(6)
The Triple Fugue
272(2)
Five-and Six-Voice Fugues
274(2)
Choral Writing
276(13)
Words and Music
276(3)
Through-Composed Polyphonic Settings
279(5)
Fugal Movements
284(1)
The Chorale in Choral Works
285(4)
The Pedagogical Foundations of Counterpoint in the Classical Period
289(9)
Background
289(1)
Fux and the Five Species
290(1)
The Application of Species to Classical Counterpoint
291(7)
Examples of Counterpoint in the Classical Period
298(12)
Incidental Passages of Polyphony within Homophonic Movements
298(3)
Hybrid Forms
301(1)
The Fugal Movement
302(2)
Canonic Technique
304(2)
Various Other Contrapuntal Devices
306(4)
Appendix: Characteristics of Dance Movements 310(3)
Bibliography 313(12)
Textbooks
313(4)
Treatises
317(5)
Other Reference Sources
322(3)
Index of Names and Works 325(6)
Index of Terms 331

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