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Practical Guide to Middle and Secondary Social Studies, A,9780205492435
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Practical Guide to Middle and Secondary Social Studies, A

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780205492435

ISBN10:
0205492436
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $96.60
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Summary

Following in the vein of her best-selling elementary book, June Chapin focuses on key topics that are critical to the teaching of social studies in the middle and secondary classrooms. This brief, practical book enables readers to concentrate on the crucial, relevant strategies and content to become effective social studies teachers who will be able to teach in a wide diversity of classrooms. The goal for the reader is to teach social studies creatively and thoughtfully so that their students become knowledgeable and responsible citizens acting on core values and beliefs.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Middle and Secondary Social Studies
1(28)
Why Become a Social Studies Teacher?
1(6)
Certification
2(1)
Your Background as an Influence
3(1)
Mounting Criticism about Middle Schools and High Schools
4(3)
What Should Be Taught? States Standards and No Child Left Behind
7(5)
Troubled Times for Public Schools
7(1)
National Social Studies Standards
8(1)
Impact of No Child Left Behind Act
9(1)
Supporters and Critics of Standards
10(1)
Impact of the Standards Movement
11(1)
What Is ``Social Studies''? A Single-Subject Discipline?
12(4)
The Social Studies Approach
12(2)
Single-Discipline Approach
14(1)
Growing Support for the Single-Discipline Approach
15(1)
Advanced Placement Examinations
15(1)
What Is in a Name?
16(1)
Why Should Social Studies Be Taught? Goals of Civic Education
16(3)
Goals
16(1)
Different Approaches
17(2)
What Content Should Be Taught, and When?
19(2)
Tradition and Present Placement
19(1)
Textbooks
20(1)
Should Values and Character Education Be Taught?
21(5)
Values
21(5)
Summary
26(1)
References
26(2)
Suggested Readings
28(1)
Professional Journals
28(1)
Web Sites
28(1)
Planning for the Social Studies
29(34)
Planning
29(5)
Planning for the Inclusive Classroom
30(1)
Adaptations
31(1)
Busy Teachers
31(1)
Value of Written Lesson Plans
32(1)
Getting Started: Locating Resources
33(1)
Long-Range Planning
34(2)
The Curriculum Planning Process
34(2)
Instructional Objectives and Specific Standards
36(3)
Objectives, Learning Experiences, and Evaluation
36(1)
Social Studies Standards and Instructional Objectives
37(2)
Communicating Expectations to Students
39(1)
Organizing Content and Skills into Units
39(14)
Units
39(1)
Commercial and Free Units
40(4)
Planning Your Own Unit: Teacher-Made Units
44(1)
Format for Units
45(1)
Integrated Curriculum
45(3)
History through Literature
48(5)
Read Novel outside of Class?
53(1)
Alternative Forms of Units
53(3)
Using Technology to Teach a Unit on the American Revolution
53(2)
Using Concepts on the American Revolution as a Framework for a Unit
55(1)
Combination of Traditional and Project Unit
55(1)
Lesson Plans
56(3)
Detail Is Important
56(3)
Block Scheduling
59(2)
A New Block of Time
59(2)
Summary
61(1)
References
61(1)
Web Sites
62(1)
Basic Instructional Methods
63(28)
The Need for Variety
63(1)
Methods
63(1)
What Happens in Real Classrooms?
64(5)
Two Instructional Perspectives
64(3)
Teaching Vocabulary/Reading
67(2)
Teacher Lectures
69(5)
Critics of the Lecture Method
69(1)
Formal Lecture
70(4)
Direct Teaching or Direct Instruction
74(4)
Correcting the Faults of Lecturing
74(1)
Teaching a Concept: Privacy
74(2)
Evaluating Direct Teaching
76(2)
Whole Class Discussions
78(3)
Informal Discussions
78(1)
Socratic Method and the Socratic Seminar
79(2)
Questioning
81(5)
Importance of Questioning
81(1)
Types of Questions
81(3)
Sequence the Questions
84(1)
Wait Time and Probing
85(1)
Foster Participation and Equity
85(1)
Encourage Student Questions
86(1)
Independent Projects
86(3)
Value of Projects
86(2)
Types of Projects
88(1)
Summary
89(1)
References
90(1)
Web Sites
90(1)
Active, Student-Centered Strategies
91(30)
Active Learning
91(1)
Cooperative Learning
92(9)
The Critical Importance of Small Group Discussion Skills
92(1)
Definitions of Small Group Learning
93(1)
Forming Teams
94(6)
Jigsaw II
100(1)
Group Projects
101(3)
Value
101(2)
Evaluations
103(1)
Using Technology for Group Projects
103(1)
Co-op Co-op
104(2)
Other Formats for Small Groups
106(2)
Brainstorming
106(1)
Think-Pair-Share
107(1)
Response Groups
107(1)
Corners
107(1)
Summary of Small Group Work
107(1)
Inquiry and Problem-Based Learning
108(5)
Importance
108(1)
The New Social Studies
108(1)
Formal Stages in Thinking or Inquiry
109(1)
Inquiry in the Social Studies Classroom
109(3)
Teacher's Role in Inquiry
112(1)
Students' Role in Inquiry
112(1)
Role Playing and Simulations
113(6)
Dramatic Play
113(1)
Role Playing
114(2)
Simulations
116(3)
Summary
119(1)
References
120(1)
Web Sites
120(1)
Using Multiple Assessments and Evaluation
121(33)
Perceptions of Evaluation
121(6)
Students
122(1)
Parents and Guardians
123(1)
Teachers
124(1)
Administrators
124(1)
The Community
125(1)
Stakeholders
126(1)
Definitions
126(1)
NAEP and State Tests
127(6)
Important Test Principles
127(1)
NAEP
128(1)
No Child Left Behind
129(1)
Norm-Referenced Tests
130(1)
Criterion-Based Testing
131(1)
Teachers Need to Research Their State Test
131(2)
Assessing Student Learning
133(5)
Types of Assessment
133(1)
Performance Assessment
134(1)
Portfolios
134(1)
Anticipating Problems with Testing
135(1)
The Timing of Tests
136(1)
Handling Missed Tests
137(1)
Avoiding Cheating on Tests
138(1)
Keep Grades Confidential
138(1)
Teacher-Made Paper-and-Pencil Tests
138(4)
Multiple-Choice Test Questions
138(3)
Other Paper-and-Pencil Test Items
141(1)
Matching
141(1)
Performance-Based Assessment
142(8)
Essay Questions
142(1)
Teach the Five-Paragraph Essay Format?
142(5)
Short-Answer Questions (Open-Response or Constructed-Response)
147(2)
Other Written Assessments
149(1)
Oral Assessments
149(1)
Grades and Report Cards
150(2)
Effort
150(1)
Other Grading Models
151(1)
Standards-Based Report Cards
151(1)
Summary
152(1)
References
153(1)
Web Sites
153(1)
Teaching History
154(31)
The Predominance of History in the Social Studies Curriculum
154(2)
Central Place of History
154(1)
Interpretations of History
155(1)
Controversies over What History Should Be Taught
156(4)
National Center for History in the Schools
156(2)
State History Standards
158(1)
Rationale for Teaching History
158(1)
Importance of Better-Quality History Instruction
159(1)
Methods and Resources for Historical Understandings
160(11)
Traditional Methods: The Textbook and Its Supplementary Materials
160(1)
Making History Alive
161(1)
Using Exciting Information
162(1)
The Promise of the Internet
162(1)
Analysis of Photos or Artwork
163(2)
Media
165(1)
The Arts and Music
166(1)
Artifacts and Virtual Field Trips
166(1)
Simulations
166(1)
History as Narrative
167(1)
Organizing Content around Key Ideas and Themes
167(2)
Teaching Social Issues in History
169(2)
Methods and Resources for Historical Thinking Skills
171(12)
Primary Sources
171(1)
Methods
172(1)
Problems
173(3)
Oral History
176(1)
Topic
176(1)
Questions
176(2)
Results
178(1)
Doing History
178(1)
Biographies and Term Papers
179(1)
Local History
179(2)
Teaching Chronological Thinking
181(2)
Summary
183(1)
References
183(1)
Web Sites
184(1)
Teaching Geography, Economics, and the Behavioral Sciences
185(28)
The Status of Geography in the Schools
185(3)
Status of the Discipline
185(1)
Geography in the K--12 Grades
186(2)
Geography Standards and the Teaching of Geography
188(11)
The Five Themes
188(3)
Standards
191(1)
State Geography Standards
192(1)
Integrating Geography with History
193(2)
Map and Related Geography Skills
195(2)
``New Geography''
197(1)
Resources
198(1)
The Status of Economics in the Schools
199(3)
Course Taking
199(1)
Growing Importance of Economics
200(2)
National Economics Frameworks and Standards
202(2)
Frameworks
202(1)
Standards
202(2)
The Teaching of Economics
204(3)
Economics Textbooks and Materials
204(1)
The Integration or Infusion Model
205(1)
Problem-Based Economic Learning
206(1)
The Internet and Media
207(1)
Behavioral Sciences: Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology
207(3)
Value of the Behavioral Sciences
207(1)
Psychology
208(1)
Sociology
209(1)
Anthropology
209(1)
Summary
210(1)
References
211(1)
Web Sites
211(1)
Journals
212(1)
Organizations
212(1)
Teaching Civic Education and Global Education
213(27)
Civics Standards
213(4)
Different Meanings of Citizenship
213(2)
The Civics Course and Infusion into Other Courses
215(1)
Civics Standards
216(1)
NAEP 1998 Civics Report Card
217(3)
Results: What Students Know
217(1)
Teacher Methods
218(1)
IEA Civic Knowledge and Engagement at Age 14
218(2)
Improving Civic Education in the Classroom and School
220(8)
Classroom Citizenship: Creating a Cooperative, Engaged Classroom
220(1)
Recommended Practices
221(1)
Issues-Centered Civic Education
222(1)
What Issues Should Be Studied?
223(1)
Value of Issues Approach in Civic Education
224(1)
Teaching Controversial Issues
224(2)
Simulations
226(1)
Civic Education Is the Responsibility of the Whole School
226(2)
The Community: Local Government and Service Learning
228(4)
Local Government Emphasis
228(1)
Service Learning
228(2)
Implementation of Service Learning
230(2)
Global Education and Multicultural/Diversity Education
232(5)
Multicultural/Diversity Education
233(1)
The Place of Global Education
234(2)
Stages in Teacher Development
236(1)
Summary
237(1)
References
237(2)
Web Sites
239(1)
Technology and Professional Growth
240(21)
Technology Issues and Challenges
240(7)
Support for Technology
240(2)
Handheld Computers and Tablet PCs
242(1)
Problems with Using Computers and the Internet in the Schools
242(1)
Staff Development and Credential Requirements
242(2)
Gender Differences and Home Usage
244(2)
Enhancing Technology in the Curriculum
246(1)
Benefits and Costs
247(1)
Student Computer Standards/Media Literacy
247(1)
Recommendations
247(1)
The Computer as a Productivity Tool: Word Processing
248(1)
Using the Internet: E-Mail and the World Wide Web
249(3)
E-Mail: Teachers
249(1)
E-Mail for Students
249(1)
World Wide Web: Primary Source Material
250(1)
Evaluating Web Sites
251(1)
Locating and Evaluating Resources
252(1)
Using Social Studies Software
252(1)
CD-ROMs
252(1)
Other Uses of Computers
253(3)
Electronic Discussion Groups and Distance Learning
253(2)
Electronic or Virtual Field Trips
255(1)
WebQuests
255(1)
Professional Growth
256(2)
Long-Range and Short-Range Planning
257(1)
Summary
258(1)
References
259(1)
Web Sites
259(1)
Journals
259(2)
Index 261


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