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Practical Guide to Red Hat(R) Linux(R) : A Fedora(TM) Core and Red Hat Enterprise Linux

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780131470248

ISBN10:
0131470248
Format:
Paperback w/CD
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

The best just became BETTER! Completely revised to meet all your Red Hat Linux needs!Fedora Core and Red Hat Enterprise Linux are advanced operating systems. You need a book that's just as advanced. This book explains Linux clearly and effectively--with a focus on the features you care about, including system security, Internet server setup, and sharing files and printers with Windows systems. Best-selling Linux AUTHOR Mark Sobell starts at the beginning and walks you through everything that matters, from installing Fedora Core using the included CDs to GNOME, KDE, Samba 3, sENDmail , Apache, DNS, NIS, and iptables . Along the way, you learn the "hows" and the "whys." Whether you are a user, an administrator, or a programmer, this book gives you all you need and more. Mark Sobell knows every Linux nook and cranny, has taught hundreds of thousands of readers, and never forgets what it's like to be new to Linux. Don't settle for yesterday's Linux book...get the ONLY book that meets today's challenges and tomorrow's! Compared with the other Linux books out there, A Practical Guide to Red Hatreg; Linuxreg;, Second EDITION, delivers... bull; bull;The full Fedora Core operating system on 4 CDs (not the truncated "PUBLISHER's EDITION") AND complete coverage of Fedora Core and the 2.6 Linux kernel, PLUS coverage of Red Hat Enterprise Linux bull;Deeper coverage of GNOME and KDE, including customization bull;More practical coverage of file sharing with Samba, NFS, and FTP bull;Easier-to-follow coverage of Internet server configuration including Apache, sENDmail , NFS, and DNS bull;More up-to-date coverage of security, including SELinux (Security Enhanced Linux), OpenSSH, and firewall setup using iptables bull;Better coverage of "meat-and-potatoes" system/network administration tasks bull;A more practical introduction to writing bash shell scripts bull;More complete coverage of configuring local and network printers using CUPS bull;And much more...including a 500+ word glossary and a comprehensive index to help you find what you need fast! Includes 4 CDs! Get the full version of Red Hat's Fedora Core 2 release!

Author Biography

Mark G. Sobell is president of Sobell Associates Inc.

Table of Contents

Preface xxxi
1 Welcome to Linux
1(20)
The GNU-Linux Connection
1 (4)
The Code Is Free
4(1)
Have Fun!
4(1)
The Linux 2.6 Kernel
5(1)
The Heritage of Linux: UNIX
5 (1)
What Is So Good About Linux?
6(3)
Why Linux Is Popular with Hardware Companies and Developers
7(1)
Linux Is Portable
7(1)
Standards
8(1)
The C Programming Language
8 (1)
Overview of Linux
9(5)
Linux Has a Kernel Programming Interface
9(1)
Linux Can Support Many Users
10(1)
Linux Can Run Many Tasks
10(1)
Linux Provides a Secure Hierarchical Filesystem
11(1)
The Shell: Command Interpreter and Programming Language
12(1)
A Large Collection of Useful Utilities
13(1)
Interprocess Communication
14 (1)
System Administration
14(1)
Additional Features of Linux
14(2)
GUI: Graphical User Interfaces
14(2)
(Inter)networking Utilities
16 (1)
Software Development
16(1)
Conventions Used in This Book
16 (4)
Chapter Summary
20 (1)
Exercises
20(1)
PART I Installing Red Hat Linux 21(52)
2 Installation Overview
23(20)
More Information
24(1)
Planning the Installation
24 (8)
Considerations
24(1)
Installation Requirements
25(1)
What Are You Installing: Fedora Core or Red Hat Enterprise Linux?
26 (1)
Installing a Fresh Copy or Upgrading an Existing Red Hat System?
26 (1)
Types of Installations (FEDORA)
27(1)
Graphical or Textual Installation?
27(1)
Setting Up the Hard Disk
27 (4)
RAID
31(1)
LVM (Logical Volume Manager)
32 (1)
How the Installation Works
32(2)
The Medium: Where Is the Source Data?
34(1)
Formats
34(1)
Sources
34(1)
Downloading, Burning, and Installing a CD Set ( FEDORA)
35(4)
Finding a Site to Download From
36(1)
Finding the Right Files and Downloading Them
36(2)
Using BitTorrent to Download the ISO Image Files
38(1)
Checking the Files
38(1)
Burning the CDs
39(1)
Rescue CD
39(1)
Collecting Information About the System
40(1)
Chapter Summary
41(1)
Exercises
42(1)
Advanced Exercises
42(1)
3 Step-by-Step Installation
43(30)
Installing Red Hat Linux
43(10)
Booting the System: The boot: Prompt
44 (1)
Boot Commands
44(2)
The Anaconda Installer
46(6)
When You Reboot
52(1)
Initializing Databases
52(1)
Installation Tasks
53(9)
Using Disk Druid to Partition the Disk
53 (4)
Using the Kickstart Configurator
57(1)
fdisk: Reports On and Partitions a Hard Disk
58 (3)
Setting Up a Dual-Boot System
61(1)
The X Window System
62(9)
system-config-display: Configuring the Display
63 (2)
The xorg.conf and XF86Config Files
65 (5)
gdm: Displays a Graphical Login
70(1)
More Information
71(1)
Chapter Summary
71(1)
Exercises
72(1)
Advanced Exercises
72(1)
PART II Getting Started with Red Hat Linux 73 (142)
4 Introduction to Red Hat Linux
75(42)
Curbing Your Power: Superuser/root/Administrator Access
75 (1)
A Tour of the Red Hat Linux Desktop
76(18)
Logging In on the System
76(2)
Getting the Most from the Desktop
78(9)
Using Konqueror to Manage Files, Run Programs, and Browse the Web
87 (3)
Customizing Your Desktop with the Control Center
90 (2)
Customizing the Main Panel Using the Panel Menu
92(2)
Getting the Facts: Where to Find Documentation
94 (7)
The KDE Help Center
94(1)
man: Displaying the System Manual
94(3)
info: Displaying Information About Utilities
97 (1)
HOWTOs: Finding Out How Things Work
98 (1)
Getting Help with Your System
99(2)
More About Logging In
101(9)
The Login Screen
102(1)
What to Do If You Cannot Log In
103(1)
Logging Out
103(1)
Using Virtual Consoles
103(1)
Logging In Remotely: Terminal Emulation and telnet
104 (1)
Changing Your Password
104(2)
switchdesk: Changing Your Default Desktop
106 (1)
Logging In from a Terminal
106(4)
Controlling Windows II
110(3)
Changing the Input Focus
110(1)
Changing the Resolution of the Display
111(1)
Understanding the Window Manager
111 (2)
Session Management
113(1)
Chapter Summary
113(1)
Exercises
114(1)
Advanced Exercises
115(2)
5 The Linux Utilities
117(40)
Special Characters
118 (1)
Basic Utilities
118(3)
Is: Lists the Names of Files
119(1)
cat: Displays a Text File
119(1)
rm: Deletes a File
120(1)
less Is more: Displaying a Text File One Screen at a Time
120 (1)
hostname: Displays Your Machine Name
120(1)
Working with Files
121 (6)
cp: Copies a File
121(1)
mv: Changes the Name of a File
122(1)
Ipr: Prints a File
122 (1)
grep: Finds a String
123(1)
head: Displays the Beginning of a File
124(1)
tail: Displays the End of a File
125(1)
sort: Displays a File in Order
125(1)
uniq: Removes Duplicate Lines from a File
126(1)
diff: Compares Two Files
126(1)
file: Tests the Contents of a File
127(1)
I (Pipe): Communicates Between Processes
127(1)
Four More Utilities
128(3)
echo: Displays Text
128(1)
date: Displays the Time and Date
128(1)
script: Records a Linux Session
129(1)
mcopy: Converts Linux Files to Windows Format
130(1)
Compressing and Archiving a File
131 (4)
gzip: Compresses a File
131(1)
gunzip and zcat: Decompress a File
132 (1)
bzip2: Compresses/Decompresses a File
133(1)
tar: Packs and Unpacks Files
133 (2)
Locating Commands
135(2)
which, whereis: Locate a Utility
135 (2)
apropos: Searches for a Keyword
137(1)
Obtaining User and System Information
137 (4)
who: Lists Users on the System
138 (1)
finger: Lists Users on the System
138 (2)
w: Lists Users on the System
140(1)
Communicating with Other Users
141(3)
write: Sends a Message
141(1)
talk: Communicates with Another User
142 (2)
mesg: Denies or Accepts Messages
144(1)
Email
144(1)
Tutorial: Creating and Editing a File with vim (vi)
145 (7)
Specifying a Terminal
145(1)
Starting vim
145(2)
Command and Input Modes
147(1)
Entering Text
148(1)
Getting Help
149(2)
Ending the Editing Session
151(1)
Chapter Summary
152(2)
Exercises
154(1)
Advanced Exercises
155(2)
6 The Linux Filesystem
157(32)
The Hierarchical Filesystem
157 (1)
Directory and Ordinary Files
158 (12)
Filenames
159(3)
mkdir: Creates a Directory
162 (1)
The Working Directory
163 (1)
Home Directory
164(1)
Absolute Pathnames
165(1)
Relative Pathnames
166(1)
Important Standard Directories and Files
167(3)
Working with Directories
170(3)
rmdir: Deletes a Directory
170 (1)
Pathnames
170(1)
mv, cp: Moves or Copies a File
171 (1)
mv: Moves a Directory
172(1)
Access Permissions
173(4)
ls -1: Displays Permissions
173(1)
chmod: Changes Access Permissions
174 (1)
Setuid and Setgid Permissions
175 (1)
Directory Access Permissions
176(1)
Links
177(6)
Hard Links
178(2)
Symbolic Link
180(2)
rm: Removes a Link
182(1)
Chapter Summary
183(1)
Exercises
184(2)
Advanced Exercises
186(3)
7 The Shell I
189(26)
The Command Line
189(5)
Syntax
190(2)
Processing the Command Line
192(1)
Executing the Command Line
193(1)
Standard Input and Standard Output
194(2)
The Screen as a File
195(1)
The Screen/Keyboard as Standard Input and Standard Output
195(1)
Redirection
196(5)
Redirecting Standard Output
197(1)
Redirecting Standard Input
198(2)
Appending Standard Output to a File
200 (1)
/dev/null: Data Sink
201(1)
Pipes
201(3)
Filters
204(1)
tee: Sends Output in Two Directions
204 (1)
Running a Program in the Background
204 (3)
Filename Generation/Pathname Expansion
207(4)
The ? Special Character
207(1)
The Special Character
208(1)
The [ ] Special Characters
209(2)
Builtins
211(1)
Chapter Summary
211 (1)
Exercises
212(2)
Advanced Exercises
214(1)
PART III Digging Into Red Hat Linux 215(152)
8 Linux GUIs: X, GNOME, and KDE
217(34)
X Window System
217(9)
Using X
220(3)
Window Managers
223(3)
Using GNOME
226(11)
Using the Nautilus File Manager
226 (6)
GNOME Utilities
232(5)
Using KDE
237(10)
Konqueror Browser/File Manager
237 (7)
KDE Utilities
244(3)
Chapter Summary
247(1)
Exercises
248(1)
Advanced Exercises
248(3)
9 The Shell II: The Bourne Again Shell
251(72)
Background
252(1)
Shell Basics
253(3)
Assignment Statements
253 (1)
Writing a Simple Shell Script
254 (2)
Separating and Grouping Commands
256(4)
; and NEWLINE Separate Commands
256(1)
\ Continues a Command
256(1)
| and & Separate Commands and Do Something Else
257 (1)
Multitasking Demonstration
258 (1)
( ) Groups Commands
259(1)
Redirecting Standard Error
260(2)
noclobber: Avoids Overwriting Files
262(1)
Job Control
262(3)
jobs: Lists Jobs
263(1)
fg: Brings a Job to the Foreground
263(1)
bg: Sends a Job to the Background
264(1)
Manipulating the Directory Stack
265 (2)
dirs: Displays the Stack
265(1)
pushd: Pushes a Directory on the Stack
266(1)
popd: Pops a Directory Off the Stack
267(1)
Processes
267(6)
Process Structure
268(1)
Process Identification
268 (2)
Executing a Command
270 (1)
Running a Shell Script
270(3)
Parameters and Variables
273 (20)
User-Created Variables
275 (7)
Keyword Variables
282 (5)
Positional Parameters
287 (4)
Special Parameters
291(2)
History
293(2)
Editing the Command Line
295(10)
fc: Displays, Edits, and Reexecutes Commands
295 (3)
Reexecuting an Event with the C Shell History Mechanism
298 (3)
The Readline Library
301(4)
Alias
305(3)
Quotation Marks: Single versus Double
305(1)
Examples
306(2)
Command Line Expansion
308 (9)
Order of Expansion
309 (1)
{} Brace Expansion
309(2)
~Tilde Expansion
311(1)
$n Parameter Expansion
311(1)
$VARIABLE Variable Expansion
312 (1)
$(...) Command Substitution
312 (1)
Arithmetic Expansion
313(1)
Word Splitting
314(1)
Pathname Expansion
315(2)
Chapter Summary
317(3)
Exercises
320(2)
Advanced Exercises
322(1)
10 Networking and the Internet
323(44)
Types of Networks and How They Work
325(16)
Broadcast
326(1)
Point-to-Point
326(1)
Switched
326(1)
LAN: Local Area Network
327(1)
WAN: Wide Area Network
328(1)
Internetworking Through Gateways and Routers
328 (3)
Network Protocols
331(3)
Host Address
334(3)
CIDR: Classless Inter-Domain Routing
337(2)
Hostnames
339(2)
Communicate over a Network
341(2)
finger: Displays Information About Remote Users
341 (1)
Sending Mail to a Remote User
342(1)
Mailing List Servers
343(1)
Network Utilities
343(7)
Trusted Hosts
343(1)
OpenSSH Tools
344(1)
telnet: Logs in on a Remote System
344(2)
ftp: Transfers Files over a Network
346(1)
ping: Tests a Network Connection
346(1)
traceroute: Traces a Route over the Internet
347 (1)
host and dig: Queries Internet Nameservers
348(1)
whois: Looks Up Information About an Internet Site
348(2)
Distributed Computing
350(9)
The Client/Server Model
351(1)
DNS: Domain Name Service
352(2)
NIS: Network Information Service
354(1)
NFS: Network Filesystem
354(1)
Internet Services
354(3)
Proxy Server
357(1)
RPC Network Services
358(1)
Usenet
359(3)
WWW: World Wide Web
362(2)
URL: Uniform Resource Locator
363(1)
Browsers
363(1)
Search Engine
364 (1)
Chapter Summary
364 (1)
Exercises
365(1)
Advanced Exercises
366(1)
PART IV System Administration 367(194)
11 System Administration: Core Concepts
369(56)
System Administrator and Superuser
371(6)
System Administration Tools
373(4)
Rescue Mode
377(2)
Avoiding a Trojan Horse
378(1)
Getting Help
379(1)
SELinux ( FEDORA)
379 (1)
System Operation
380(13)
Booting the System
381(1)
Init Scripts: Start and Stop System Services
381(5)
Emergency Mode
386 (1)
Single-User Mode
387 (1)
Going Multiuser
387 (1)
Multiuser/Graphics Mode
388(1)
Logging In
388(2)
Running a Program and Logging Out
390(1)
Bringing the System Down
390(2)
Crash
392(1)
Useful Utilities
393(6)
Red Hat Configuration Tools
393(3)
Linux Utilities
396 (3)
Setting Up a Server
399(14)
Standard Rules in Configuration Files
399(2)
rpcinfo: Displays Information About portmap
401(2)
The xinetd Super Server
403(1)
Securing a Server
404 (4)
DHCP
408(5)
nsswitch.conf: Which Service to Look at First
413(3)
How nsswitch.conf Works
413(3)
PAM
416(6)
More Information
417(1)
Configuration File, Module Type, and Control Flag
417(2)
Example
419(2)
Modifying the PAM Configuration
421 (1)
Chapter Summary
422(1)
Exercises
423(1)
Advanced Exercises
423(2)
12 Files, Directories, and Filesystems
425(28)
Important Files and Directories
425 (11)
File Types
436(4)
Ordinary Files, Directories, Links, and Inodes
436(1)
Special Files
437(3)
Filesystems
440(10)
mount: Mounts a Filesystem
442 (3)
umount: Unmounts a Filesystem
445 (1)
fstab: Keeps Track of Filesystems
445 (2)
fsck: Checks Filesystem Integrity
447 (1)
tune2fs: Changes Filesystem Parameters
447(2)
RAID Filesystem
449(1)
Chapter Summary
450(1)
Exercises
450(1)
Advanced Exercises
451(2)
13 Downloading and Installing Software
453(32)
system-config-packages: Adds and Removes Software Packages
453(2)
rpm: Red Hat Package Manager
455 (3)
Querying Packages and Files
456(1)
Installing, Upgrading, and Removing Packages
457(1)
Installing a Linux Kernel Binary
458 (1)
Installing Non-rpm Software
458(2)
The /opt and /usr/local Directories
458 (1)
GNU Configure and Build System
459 (1)
Keeping Software Up-to-Date
460(9)
Bugs
461(1)
Errata
461(1)
Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Network, and up2date
462 (5)
Red Hat Network (RHEL)
467(2)
Keeping the System Up-to-Date
469(13)
yum: Updates and Installs Packages
469 (3)
Apt: An Alternative to yum
472(6)
BitTorrent
478(3)
wget: Download Files Noninteractively
481 (1)
Chapter Summary
482(1)
Exercises
482(1)
Advanced Exercises
483(2)
14 Printing with CUPS
485(22)
Introduction
485(2)
Prerequisites
486(1)
More Information
486(1)
JumpStart I: Configuring a Local Printer Using system-config-printer
487 (2)
JumpStart II: Configuring a Remote Printer Using CUPS
489 (3)
Traditional UNIX Printing
492(1)
Configuring Printers Using CUPS
493(7)
The CUPS Web Interface
493(2)
CUPS on the Command Line
495(4)
Sharing CUPS Printers
499 (1)
The GNOME Print Manager
500 (1)
The KDE Printing Manager
501 (1)
Integration with Windows
502(2)
Printing from Windows
502(2)
Printing to Windows
504 (1)
Chapter Summary
504(1)
Exercises
505(1)
Advanced Exercises
505(2)
15 Rebuilding the Linux Kernel
507(14)
Preparing the Source Code
508(1)
Locating the Source Code
508(1)
Installing the Source Code
508 (1)
Read the Documentation
509(1)
Configuring and Compiling the Linux Kernel
509(4)
Cleaning the Source Tree
509 (1)
Configuring the Linux Kernel
510 (2)
Compiling the Linux Kernel
512 (1)
Using Loadable Kernel Modules
512(1)
Installing the Kernel and Associated Files
513 (1)
Changing lilo.conf (RHEL)
513 (1)
grub.conf
513(1)
Rebooting
514(1)
Boot Loader
514(3)
grub: The Linux Loader
514(2)
lilo: The Linux Loader (RHEL)
516 (1)
LOADLIN: A DOS-Based Linux Loader
517(1)
dmesg: Display Kernel Messages
517 (1)
Chapter Summary
518(1)
Exercises
519(1)
Advanced Exercises
519(2)
16 Administration Tasks
521(30)
Configuring User and Group Accounts
521 (3)
system-config-users: Manages User Accounts
521 (2)
useradd: Adds a User Account
523(1)
userdel: Removes a User Account
523 (1)
groupadd: Adds a Group
523(1)
Backing Up Files
524(7)
Choosing a Backup Medium
525(1)
Backup Utilities
525(3)
Performing a Simple Backup
528(1)
dump, restore: Back Up and Restore Filesystems
529 (2)
Scheduling Tasks
531(1)
cron and crontab: Schedule Routine Tasks
531 (1)
at: Runs Occasional Tasks
531(1)
kcron: Schedules Tasks
532(1)
System Reports
532(3)
vmstat: Reports Virtual Memory Statistics
533(1)
top: Lists Processes Using the Most Resources
534 (1)
Keeping Users Informed
535(1)
Creating Problems
536(1)
Failing to Perform Regular Backups
536(1)
Not Reading and Following Instructions
536(1)
Failing to Ask for Help When Instructions Are Not Clear
536 (1)
Deleting or Mistyping a Critical File
537(1)
Solving Problems
537(11)
Helping When a User Cannot Log In
537 (1)
Speeding Up the System
538(1)
Isof: Finds Open Files
539(1)
Keeping a Machine Log
539(1)
Keeping the System Secure
540(1)
Log Files and Mail for root
541(1)
Monitoring Disk Usage
541(2)
logrotate: Manages Log Files
543(2)
Removing Unused Space from Directories
545 (1)
Disk Quota System
545(1)
syslogd: Logs System Messages
546(2)
Chapter Summary
548(1)
Exercises
548(1)
Advanced Exercises
549(2)
17 Configuring a LAN
551(10)
Setting Up the Hardware
551 (3)
Connecting the Computers
552(1)
Gateways and Routers
553(1)
Network Interface Card (NIC)
553(1)
Configuring the Systems
554(3)
system-config-network: Configuring the Hardware
555 (2)
iwconfig: Configuring a Wireless NIC
557(1)
Setting Up Servers
557(2)
More Information
559(1)
Summary
559(1)
Exercises
559(1)
Advanced Exercises
560(1)
PART V Using Clients and Setting Up Servers 561 (242)
18 OpenSSH: Secure Network Communication
563(20)
Introduction
563(1)
About OpenSSH
564 (3)
Files
564(2)
How OpenSSH Works
566(1)
More Information
567(1)
OpenSSH Clients
567 (7)
Prerequisites
567(1)
JumpStart: Using ssh and scp
567(1)
Setup
568(2)
ssh: Connect to and Execute Commands on a Remote System
570(2)
scp: Copying a File from/to a Remote System
572(1)
sftp: A Secure FTP Client
573(1)
~/.ssh/config and /etc/ssh/ssh_config Configuration Files
573(1)
sshd: OpenSSH Server 574
Prerequisites
574(1)
JumpStart: Starting the sshd Daemon
575(1)
Authorized Keys: Automatic Login
575(2)
Command Line Options
577(1)
/etc/ssh/sshd_config Configuration File
577(1)
Troubleshooting
578 (1)
Tunneling/Port Forwarding
579(2)
Chapter Summary
581 (1)
Exercises
582(1)
Advanced Exercises
582(1)
19 FTP: Transferring Files Across a Network
583(26)
Introduction
583(1)
More Information
584 (1)
FTP Client
585(9)
Prerequisites
585(1)
JumpStart: Downloading Files Using ftp
585(3)
Notes
588(1)
Anonymous FTP
589 (1)
Automatic Login
589(1)
Binary versus ASCII Transfer Mode
589(1)
ftp Specifics
590(4)
FTP Server (vsftpd)
594 (12)
Prerequisites
594(1)
Notes
594(1)
JumpStart: Starting a vsftpd Server
595(1)
Testing the Setup
595(1)
vsftpd.conf: Configuring vsftpd
596(10)
Chapter Summary
606 (1)
Exercises
607 (1)
Advanced Exercises
607(2)
20 sendmail: Setting Up Mail Clients, Servers, and More
609(28)
Introduction
610(2)
Prerequisites
610(1)
More Information
611(1)
JumpStart I: Configuring sendmail on a Client
612 (1)
JumpStart II: Configuring sendmail on a Server
612(1)
How sendmail Works
613 (4)
Mail logs
614(1)
Aliases and Forwarding
614(2)
Related Programs
616 (1)
Configuring sendmail
617(5)
The sendmail.mc and sendmail.cf Files
617(2)
Other Files in /etc/mail
619(3)
In Addition to sendmail
622 (9)
SpamAssassin
622 (3)
Webmail
625(2)
Mailing Lists
627(1)
Setting Up an IMAP or POP3 Server
628(1)
Setting Up KMail
629 (2)
Authenticated Relaying
631 (2)
Alternatives to sendmail
633 (1)
Chapter Summary
633(1)
Exercises
634 (1)
Advanced Exercises
634(3)
21 NIS: Network Information Service
637(18)
Introduction to NIS
637 (1)
How NIS Works
638 (2)
More Information
640(1)
NIS Client Setup
640 (5)
Prerequisites
640 (1)
Notes
641(1)
Step-by-Step
641 (1)
Test the Setup
642(1)
yppasswd: Changing NIS Passwords
643(2)
NIS Server Setup
645 (7)
Prerequisites
645 (1)
Notes
645(1)
Step-by-Step
646 (5)
Testing
651(1)
yppasswdd: NIS Password Update Daemon
651(1)
Chapter Summary
652 (1)
Exercises
652(1)
Advanced Exercises
653(2)
22 NFS: Sharing Filesystems
655(20)
Introduction
655(3)
More Information
658(1)
NFS Client
658(6)
Prerequisites
658(1)
JumpStart: Mounting a Remote Directory Hierarchy
658(2)
mount: Mounts a Directory Hierarchy
660(2)
Improving Performance
662(1)
/etc/fstab: Mounts Directory Hierarchies Automatically
663(1)
NFS Server
664(7)
Prerequisites
664(1)
JumpStart: system-config-nfs: Configures an NFS Server
664 (1)
Exporting a Directory Hierarchy
665(5)
exportfs: Maintains the List of Exported Directory Hierarchies
670 (1)
Testing the Server Setup
670(1)
automount: Mounting Directory Hierarchies Automatically
671(2)
Chapter Summary
673(1)
Exercises
673(1)
Advanced Exercises
674(1)
23 Samba: Integrating Linux and Windows
675(24)
Which Version of Samba?
675(1)
Introduction
676(1)
About Samba
677(2)
Prerequisites
677(1)
More Information
677(1)
Samba Users, User Maps, and Passwords
677(2)
JumpStart: system-config-samba: Configuring a Samba Server
679(2)
swat: Configuring a Samba Server
681(3)
Manually Configuring a Samba Server
684 (7)
Parameters in the smbd.conf File
685(6)
The [homes] Share: Sharing Users' Home Directories
691 (1)
Accessing Linux Shares from Windows
691 (1)
Browsing Shares
691(1)
Mapping a Share
691(1)
Accessing Windows Shares from Linux
692 (2)
smbtree: Displaying Windows Shares
692 (1)
smbclient: Connecting to Windows Shares
692 (1)
Browsing Windows Networks
693(1)
smbmount: Mounting Windows Shares
693 (1)
Troubleshooting
694(2)
Chapter Summary
696(1)
Exercises
696(1)
Advanced Exercises
697(2)
24 DNS/BIND: Tracking Domain Names and Addresses
699(38)
Introduction to DNS
699(11)
Nodes, Domains, and Subdomains
701(1)
Zones
702 (1)
Queries
703 (1)
Servers
704(1)
DNS Database
705(2)
DNS Query and Response
707(1)
Reverse Name Resolution
708(2)
About DNS
710(1)
How DNS Works
710(1)
Prerequisites
711(1)
More Information
711(1)
JumpStart 1: Setting Up a DNS Cache
711(1)
JumpStart II: system-config-bind: Setting Up a Domain
712(3)
Setting Up BIND
715(9)
named.conf
715(2)
Zone Files
717(1)
A DNS Cache
717 (4)
DNS Glue
721(1)
TSIG (Transaction Signatures)
722(2)
Running BIND Inside a chroot Jail
724(1)
Troubleshooting
724(1)
A Full-functioned Nameserver
725(4)
A Slave Server
729(1)
A Split Horizon Server
730(5)
Chapter Summary
735 (1)
Exercises
735(1)
Advanced Exercises
736(1)
25 iptables: Setting Up a Firewall
737(22)
How iptables Works
737 (3)
About iptables
740(1)
More Information
740 (1)
Prerequisites
740(1)
Notes
741(1)
JumpStart: Using system-config-securitylevel to Build a Firewall
741 (1)
Anatomy of an iptables Command
742(2)
Building a Set of Rules
744(7)
Commands
744(1)
Packet Match Criteria
745(1)
Display Criteria
746(1)
Match Extensions
746(2)
Targets
748(2)
Copying Rules to and from the Kernel
750(1)
A Rule Set Generated by system-config-securitylevel
751(1)
Sharing an Internet Connection Using NAT
752(4)
Connecting Several Clients to a Single Internet Connection
753 (2)
Connecting Several Servers to a Single Internet Connection
755 (1)
Chapter Summary
756(1)
Exercises
756(1)
Advanced Exercises
757(2)
26 Apache (httpd): Setting Up a Web Server
759(44)
Introduction
760(1)
About Apache
760(2)
Prerequisites
760(1)
More Information
761 (1)
Notes
762(1)
JumpStart I: Getting Apache Up and Running
762 (2)
Modifying the httpd.conf Configuration File
762(1)
Testing Apache
763(1)
Putting Your Content in Place
763(1)
JumpStart II: Setting Up Apache with system-config-httpd
764 (2)
Filesystem Layout
766(1)
Configuration Directives
767(21)
Directives I: Directives You May Want to Modify As You Get Started
768 (4)
Contexts and Containers
772(4)
Directives II
776(12)
The Red Hat httpd.conf File
788(2)
Section 1: Global Environment
788 (1)
Section 2: Main Server Configuration
789 (1)
Section 3: Virtual Hosts
790(1)
Redirects
790(1)
Multiviews
791(1)
Server Generated Directory Listings (Indexing)
791 (1)
VirtualHosts
791(1)
Troubleshooting
792(1)
Modules
793(6)
Module List
793(1)
mod_cgi and CGI Scripts
794(1)
mod_ssl
795(2)
Authentication Modules and .htaccess
797 (1)
Scripting Modules
798(1)
webalizer: Analyzing Web Traffic
799 (1)
MRTG: Monitoring Traffic Loads
799 (1)
Error Codes
799(1)
Chapter Summary
800(1)
Exercises
801(1)
Advanced Exercises
801(2)
PART VI Programming 803 (98)
27 Programming Tools
805(46)
Programming in C
805(8)
Checking Your Compiler
806(1)
A C Programming Example
807 (3)
Compiling and Linking a C Program
810(3)
Using Shared Libraries
813(3)
Fixing Broken Binaries
815 (1)
Creating Shared Libraries
816(1)
make: Keeps a Set of Programs Current
816(7)
Implied Dependencies
818 (3)
Macros
821(2)
Debugging C Programs
823(10)
gcc: Compiler Warning Options Find Errors in Programs
826 (2)
Symbolic Debugger
828(5)
Threads
833(1)
System Calls
834(2)
strace: Traces System Calls
834 (1)
Controlling Processes
835 (1)
Accessing the Filesystem
835(1)
Source Code Management
836(10)
CVS: Concurrent Versions System
837(9)
Chapter Summary
846 (1)
Exercises
847 (1)
Advanced Exercises
848(3)
28 Programming the Bourne Again Shell
851(50)
Control Structures
852(32)
if...then
852 (4)
if...then...else
856(2)
if...then...elif
858(6)
for...in
864 (2)
for
866(2)
while
868 (4)
until
872(2)
break and continue
874(1)
case
874 (7)
select
881(1)
Here Document
882(2)
Expanding Null or Unset Variables
884(2)
:- Uses a Default Value
885(1)
:= Assigns a Default Value
885(1)
:? Displays an Error Message
886(1)
String Pattern Matching
886(1)
Filename Generation
887(1)
Builtins
887(7)
exec: Executes a Command
887(2)
trap: Catches a Signal
889(3)
A Partial List of Builtins
892(2)
Functions
894 (2)
Chapter Summary
896(1)
Exercises
897(2)
Advanced Exercises
899(2)
PART VII Appendixes 901(54)
A Regular Expressions
903(10)
Characters
903(1)
Delimiters
904(1)
Simple Strings
904(1)
Special Characters
904(3)
Periods
904(1)
Brackets
905(1)
Asterisks
906(1)
Carets and Dollar Signs
906 (1)
Quoting Special Characters
907(1)
Rules
907(1)
Longest Match Possible
907 (1)
Empty Regular Expressions
908 (1)
Bracketing Expressions
908(1)
The Replacement String
908(1)
Ampersand
909(1)
Quoted Digit
909(1)
Extended Regular Expressions
909 (2)
Appendix Summary
911(2)
B Help
913(8)
Solving a Problem
913(1)
Finding Linux-Related Information
914 (6)
Documentation
915(1)
Useful Linux Sites
916(1)
Linux Newsgroups
917(1)
Mailing Lists
917(1)
Words
917(1)
Software
918(1)
Office Suites and Word Processors
919 (1)
Specifying a Terminal
920(1)
C Security
921(22)
Encryption
922(5)
Public Key Encryption
923 (1)
Symmetric Key Encryption
924 (1)
Encryption Implementation
925 (1)
GnuPG/PGP
926(1)
File Security
927(1)
Email Security
927(1)
MTAs (Mail Transfer Agents)
928(1)
MUAs (Mail User Agents)
928(1)
Network Security
928(3)
Network Security Solutions
929(1)
Network Security Guidelines
930(1)
Host Security
931(5)
Login Security
932(1)
Remote Access Security
933(1)
Viruses and Worms
934(1)
Physical Security
935 (1)
Security Resources
936 (4)
Appendix Summary
940(3)
D The Free Software Definition
943(4)
E The Linux 2.6 Kernel
947(8)
Native Posix Thread Library (NPTL)
947(1)
IPSecurity (IPSec)
948(1)
Asynchronous I/O (AIO)
948(1)
O(1) Scheduler
949(1)
OProfile
949(1)
kksymoops
949(1)
Reverse Map Virtual Memory (rmap VM)
950(1)
HugeTLBFS (Translation Look-Aside Buffer File System)
950 (1)
Remap_file_pages
950(1)
2.6 Network Stack Features (IGMPv3, IPv6, and Others)
951 (1)
Internet Protocol Virtual Server (IPVS)
951(1)
Access Control Lists (ACLs)
951(1)
4GB-4GB Memory Split: Physical Address Extension (PAE)
951 (1)
Scheduler Support for HyperThreaded CPUs
952(1)
Block I/O (BIO) Block Layer
952(1)
Support for > 2TB Filesystem
952(1)
New I/O Elevators
953(1)
Interactive Scheduler Response Tuning
953(2)
Glossary 955 (54)
Index 1009

Excerpts

Whether you are an end user, a system administrator, or a little of each, this book explains, with step-by-step examples, how to get the most out of your Fedora Core or Red Hat Enterprise Linux system. In 28 chapters, this book takes you from installing a Fedora Core or Red Hat Enterprise Linux system through understanding its inner workings, to setting up secure servers.This book is designed for a wide range of readers; it does not require programming experience, but some experience using a general-purpose computer is helpful. This book is appropriate for Studentstaking a class in which they use Linux Home userswho want to set up and/or run Linux Professionalswho use Linux at work System administratorswho need an understanding of Linux and the tools that are available to them Computer science studentsstudying the Linux operating system Programmerswho need to understand the Linux programming environment Technical executiveswho want to get a grounding in LinuxA Practical Guide to Red Hat Linux, Second Edition: Fedora Core and Red Hat Enterprise Linuxgives you a broad understanding of many facets of Linux, from installing Red Hat linux through using and customizing it. Regardless of your background, this book gives you the knowledge you need to get on with your work: You will come away from this book understanding how to use Linux, and this book will remain a valuable reference for years to come. This Book Includes the Full Fedora Core 2 on Four CDs Tip: The CDs in This Book Hold the Full Release of Fedora Core 2This book includes the full Fedora Core version 2 CDs, not the truncated publisher's edition CDs. These four CDs include the complete release of Red Hat's Fedora Core 2. See fedora.redhat.com for details.A Practical Guide to Red Hat Linux, Second Edition, includes CDs that you can use to install or upgrade to Fedora Core 2. Chapter 2 helps you get ready to install, and Chapter 3 provides step-by-step instructions on installing, Fedora Core from these CDs. This book guides you through learning about, using, and administrating Fedora Core or Red Hat Enterprise Linux.This book covers Fedora Core 2 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux version 3. Features of This BookThis book is designed and organized so you can get the most out of it in the shortest amount of time. You do not have to read this book in page order. Once you are comfortable using Linux, you can use this book as a reference: Look up a topic of interest in the table of contents or index and read about it. Or think of this book as a catalog of Linux topics: Flip through the pages until a topic catches your eye. This book has many pointers to Web sites where you can get additional information: Consider the Web an extension of this book.A Practical Guide to Red Hat Linux, Second Edition, is structured with the following features: In this book, the termRed Hat Linuxrefers to bothFedora CoreandRed Hat Enterprise Linux. Features that apply to one operating system or the other only are marked as such using these markers:FEDORAorRHEL. Optional sectionsmean you can read the book at different levels, returning to more difficult material when you are ready. Caution boxeshighlight procedures that can easily go wrong, giving you guidance before you run into trouble. Tip boxeshighlight places in the text where you can save time by doing something differently or when it may be useful or just interesting to have additional information. Security boxespoint out places where you can make your system more secure. Thesecurity appendixgives


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