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The Prentice Hall Reader,9780131828018

The Prentice Hall Reader

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780131828018

ISBN10:
0131828010
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $53.40

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Summary

This best-selling rhetorical modes reader features ten chapters focusing on classic rhetorical modes such as narration, description and argument and persuasion. Each chapter offers readings scaled by difficulty, suggestions for using the strategy in other disciplines, connecting and anticipating questions, detailed writing exercises and extensive revision activities. New Features: bull; bull;Literary examples of the organizational strategies added to each chapter to help students connect poems or brief short stories with the given strategy. bull;New prewriting and rewriting suggestions. bull;"Writing Links" for each essay that focuses students' attention on how the writer uses punctuation, word choice, sentence structure, typographical devices and paragraph skills to create an effective essay. The Companion Website trade; is the largest, most extensive Website of any reader. Among its highlights, the site features hotlinks, additional background information on the readings, writing assignments and practice using Web-based materials. Supplements Include: bull; bull;Instructor's Quiz Booklet bull;Annotated Instructor's Edition with "teaching strategy" for each essay, class activities, collaborative learning activities, critical reading activities and links to writing. bull;Teaching Writing with the Prentice Hall Reader that offers helpful suggestions to the new and seasoned instructor.

Table of Contents

Thematic Contents xvii
Preface xxvii
How to Read an Essay
1(15)
How Does Reading Help You Write?
1(1)
How Does Writing Help You Read?
2(1)
Active Rather than Passive Reading
3(1)
Prereading
4(1)
Reading
4(1)
Rereading
5(2)
A Sample Reading: Lewis Thomas / On Cloning a Human Being
7(7)
Some Things to Remember When Reading
14(2)
How to Write an Essay
16(542)
A Writer's Subject
16(1)
A Writer's Purpose
17(1)
A Writer's Audience
17(1)
Some Things to Remember
18(1)
A Writer's Information
18(5)
A Writer's Thesis
23(3)
Revising an Essay
26(2)
Is an Error-Free Paper an ``A'' Paper?
28(1)
A Student Writer's Revision Process
29(2)
Sample Student Essay: Tina Burton / The Watermelon Wooer
31(7)
Some Things to Remember When Revising
38(1)
Gathering and Using Examples
39(48)
Where Can You Find Details and Examples?
40(2)
How Do I Gather Details and Examples from My Experiences?
42(1)
How Do I Gather Information from Outside Sources?
43(1)
How Many Examples Are Enough?
44(1)
Sample Student Essay: Frank Smite / Looking for Love
45(2)
Some Things to Remember
47(1)
Visualizing Examples
47(1)
Example as a Literary Strategy: Bret Lott / Night
48(2)
Gathering and Using Examples in Writing for Your Other Courses
50(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
51(34)
The Name Is Mine
52(5)
Anna Quindlen
Cut
57(8)
Bob Greene
Westbury Court
65(6)
Edwidge Danticat
Being Brians
71(7)
Brian Doyle
One of the Girls
78(7)
Leslie Heywood
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Example
85(2)
Narration
87(48)
What Do You Include in a Narrative?
88(1)
How Do You Structure a Narrative?
89(1)
How Are Narratives Told?
90(1)
What Do You Write About If Nothing Ever Happened to You?
91(1)
Sample Student Essay: Hope Zucker / The Ruby Slippers
92(4)
Some Things to Remember
96(1)
Visualizing Narration
96(1)
Narration as a Literary Strategy: Peggy McNally / Waiting
96(3)
Using Narration in Your Writing for Other Courses
99(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
100(33)
Salvation
101(5)
Langston Hughes
Sister Monroe
106(5)
Maya Angelou
The Biggest Play of His Life
111(5)
Rick Reilly
Marina
116(9)
Judith Ortiz Cofer
Lockdown
125(8)
Evans D. Hopkins
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Narration
133(2)
Description
135(56)
How Do You Describe an Object or a Place?
138(1)
How Do You Describe a Person?
138(1)
How Do You Organize a Description?
139(1)
Does Description Mean Lots of Adjectives and Adverbs?
140(1)
Sample Student Essay: Nadine Resnick / Natalie
140(3)
Some Things to Remember
143(1)
Visualizing Description
143(1)
Description as a Literary Strategy: Duane BigEagle / Traveling to Town
144(3)
Using Description in Your Writing for Other Courses
147(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
148(41)
Po-Po
150(6)
Eric Liu
The Way to Rainy Mountain
156(8)
N. Scott Momaday
Nameless, Tennessee
164(8)
William Least Heat Moon
The Village Watchman
172(8)
Terry Tempest Williams
The Inheritance of Tools
180(9)
Scott Russell Sanders
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Description
189(2)
Division and Classification
191(62)
How Do You Choose a Subject?
194(1)
How Do You Divide or Classify a Subject?
194(2)
How Do You Structure a Division or Classification Essay?
196(1)
Sample Student Essay: Evan James / Riding the Rails: The American Hobo
197(2)
Some Things to Remember
199(1)
Visualizing Division and Classification
199(2)
Division and Classification as a Literary Strategy: Elizabeth Barrett Browning / How Do I Love Thee?
201(1)
Using Division and Classification in Writing for Your Other Courses
202(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
203(47)
What's in Your Toothpaste?
204(5)
David Bodanis
In Defense of Talk Shows
209(5)
Barbara Ehrenreich
English 99: Literacy among the Ruins
214(9)
Frank Gannon
The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria
223(8)
Judith Ortiz Cofer
The Value of Children: A Taxonomical Essay
231(9)
Bernard R. Berelson
Why We Travel
240(10)
Pico Iyer
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Division and Classification
250(3)
Comparison and Contrast
253(55)
How Do You Choose a Subject?
256(1)
Do You Always Find Both Similarities and Differences?
257(1)
How Do You Use Analogy, Metaphor, and Simile?
258(1)
How Do You Structure a Comparison and Contrast?
259(2)
Sample Student Essay: Alicia Gray / Subject vs. Keyword Searches
261(5)
Some Things to Remember
266(1)
Visualizing Comparison and Contrast
266(1)
Comparison and Contrast as a Literary Strategy: Martin Espada / Coca-Cola and Coco Frio
267(2)
Using Comparison and Contrast in Writing for Your Other Courses
269(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
270(37)
Guavas
271(4)
Esmeralda Santiago
The Transaction: Two Writing Processes
275(4)
William Zinsser
Academic Selves
279(5)
Mary Pipher
Fun Ethic vs. Work Ethic?
284(5)
Robert J. Samuelson
The Color of Love
289(7)
Danzy Senna
Virtual Love
296(11)
Meghan Daum
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Comparison and Contrast
307(1)
Process
308(59)
How Do You Choose a Subject to Write About?
310(1)
How Do You Structure a Process Paper?
310(2)
Sample Student Essay: Julie Anne Halbfish / How to Play Dreidel
312(2)
Some Things to Remember
314(1)
Visualizing Process
315(2)
Process as a Literary Strategy: Janice Mirikitani / Recipe
317(1)
Using Process in Writing for Your Other Courses
318(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
319(46)
My Daily Dives in the Dumpster
320(7)
Lars Eighner
Revision and Life: Take It from the Top---Again
327(6)
Nora Ephron
Don't Just Stand There
333(8)
Diane Cole
The Culture of Martyrdom
341(7)
David Brooks
Into the Loop: How to Get the Job You Want after Graduation
348(10)
Charlie Drozdyk
The Page Turner
358(7)
Lynne Sharon Schwartz
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Process
365(2)
Cause and Effect
367(58)
Why Do You Write a Cause and Effect Analysis?
369(1)
How Do You Choose a Subject?
370(1)
How Do You Isolate and Evaluate Causes and Effects?
370(1)
How Do You Structure a Cause and Effect Analysis?
371(2)
Sample Student Essay: Cathy Ferguson / TV Aggression and Children
373(3)
Some Things to Remember
376(1)
Visualizing Cause and Effect
376(2)
Cause and Effect as a Literary Strategy: Marge Piercy / Barbie Doll
378(1)
Using Cause and Effect in Writing for Your Other Courses
379(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
380(43)
My Wood
381(6)
E. M. Forster
The Origins of Anorexia Nervosa
387(6)
Joan Jacobs Brumberg
Black Men and Public Space
393(6)
Brent Staples
Dreadlocked
399(6)
Veronica Chambers
Why They Excel
405(7)
Fox Butterfield
The Trouble with Fries
412(11)
Malcolm Gladwell
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Cause and Effect
423(2)
Definition
425(47)
How Much Do You Include in a Definition?
427(1)
How Do You Structure a Definition?
428(1)
Sample Student Essay: Sherry Heck / Infallible
429(3)
Some Things to Remember
432(1)
Visualizing Definition
432(2)
Definition as a Literary Strategy: Alice Jones / The Foot
434(1)
Using Definition in Writing for Your Other Courses
435(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
436(36)
Adults Only
437(4)
Bob Greene
I Want a Wife
441(5)
Judy Brady
The People in Me
446(5)
Robin D. G. Kelley
Mother Tongue
451(8)
Amy Tan
Mess
459(6)
John Hollander
The Female Body
465(7)
Margaret Atwood
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Definition
472(1)
Argument and Persuasion
472(61)
How Do You Analyze Your Audience?
475(1)
What Does It Take to Persuade Your Reader?
476(2)
How Do You Make Sure That Your Argument Is Logical?
478(1)
How Do You Structure an Argument?
479(2)
Sample Student Essay: Beth Jaffe / Lowering the Cost of a College Education
481(3)
Some Things to Remember
484(1)
Visualizing Argument and Persuasion
484(2)
Argument and Persuasion as a Literary Strategy: Wilfred Owen / Dulce et Decorum Est
486(1)
Using Argument and Persuasion in Writing for Your Other Courses
487(2)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
489(42)
I Have a Dream
490(7)
Martin Luther King Jr.
The Marrying Kind
497(5)
Jonathan Rauch
The Case Against College
502(4)
Linda Lee
What Do Murderers Deserve?
506(6)
David Gelernter
The New Yorker/Help for Sex Offenders
512(3)
The Singer Solution to World Poverty
515(10)
Peter Singer
None of This Is Fair
525(6)
Richard Rodriguez
Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions for Argument and Persuasion
531(2)
Revising
533(25)
Analyzing Your Own Writing
534(1)
Keeping a Revision Log
535(1)
Using Peer Readers
536(2)
Using Your School's Writing Center or a Writing Tutor
538(1)
Using an OWL
539(1)
Conferencing with Your Instructor
539(1)
Proofreading Your Paper
540(2)
Visualizing Revision
542(1)
Revisers at Work
543(1)
Visit the Prentice Hall Reader's Website
543(1)
Revision Case Study:
Caught in the Widow's Web
544(6)
Gordon Grice
Journal Entries: The Black Widow
550(5)
A Conversation with Gordon Grice
555(3)
Appendix Finding, Using, and Documenting Sources
558(42)
Finding Sources
558(7)
Web Searching Tips
565(6)
Using Sources
571(4)
Documenting Your Sources
575(8)
Electronic Sources
583(1)
Annotated Sample Student Research Paper (MLA Documentation Style): Amy Rubens / Ecotourism: Friend or Foe?
584(16)
Glossary 600(10)
Credits 610(6)
Index 616

Excerpts

The Prentice Hall Readeris predicated on two premises: that reading plays a vital role in learning how to write and that writing and reading can best be organized around the traditional division of discourse into a number of structural patterns. Such a division is not the only way that the forms of writing can be classified, but it does have several advantages. First, practice in these structural patterns encourages students to organize knowledge and to see the ways in which information can be conveyed. How else does the mind know except by classifying, comparing, defining, or seeking cause and effect relationships? Second, the most common use of these patterns occurs in writing done in academic courses. There students are asked to narrate a chain of events, to describe an artistic style, to classify plant forms, to compare two political systems, to tell how a laboratory experiment was performed, to analyze why famine occurs in Africa, to define a philosophical concept, or to argue for or against building a space station. Learning how to structure papers using these patterns is an exercise that has immediate application in students' other academic work. Finally, because the readings use these patterns as structural devices, they offer an excellent way in which to integrate reading into a writing course. Students can see the patterns at work and learn how to use them to become more effective writers and better, more efficient readers. WHAT IS NEW IN THE SEVENTH EDITION The seventh edition ofThe Prentice Hall Readerfeatures 54 essays, 15 of which are new, and another 11 papers written by student writers. Also new to this edition are 9 poems or short, short stories that show the organizational strategies at work. As in the previous editions, the readings are chosen on the basis of several criteria: how well they demonstrate a particular pattern of organization, appeal to a freshman audience, and promote interesting and appropriate discussion and writing activities. The seventh edition ofThe Prentice Hall Readerincludes a number of new features: Literary Examples of Each Organizational Strategy.A poem or short, short story has been added to each of the nine chapters. These creative examples show how the strategies can be used to structure not just essays, but poetry and fiction as well. Each selection has discussion questions and writing suggestions. New Prewriting and Rewriting Suggestions.Each of the 9 chapters ends with a list of prewriting and rewriting suggestions for that particular strategy. The suggestions offer students a convenient checklist of appropriate activities. Writing Links. Each essay has a "Writing Link" that focuses students' attention on how the writer uses punctuation, word choice, sentence structure, typographical devices, and paragraph skills to create an effective essay. The links will help build bridges between the content of the essays and the writing skills they reveal. New Chapter Introductions.Each chapter introduction has been rewritten to emphasize the visual display of information. The seventh edition retains and improves upon some of the popular student features from earlier editions: Visualizing.Sections in each chapter show how the writing strategy is embodied in visual forms. A panel cartoon is a narrative, a technical drawing details a process, advertisements (even for products that do not exist!) show persuasion at work. Writing in Other Disciplines.Each chapter provides examples of how the traditional patterns of organization are used in writing for other college courses. Prereading Questions.These questions help connect the reading to students' experience and focus their reading attention. Writers on Writing.Writers share their observations on the process of finding a subject, composing, and revising. Links to the Website.


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