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The Prentice Hall Reader

by
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780131955714

ISBN10:
0131955713
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 8th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

This best-selling collection features ten chapters focusing on the classic methods of narration, description, argument, and persuasion. It contains classic and contemporary essays about popular culture, along with advice about how to read analytically, and how to write persuasively and effectively. Each chapter is organized clearly and effectively, enabling the reader to not only understand each essay and but also what the writer was trying to convey. An excellent reference work as well as an interesting and thoughtful collection of essays.

Table of Contents

Thematic Contents xix
Preface xxvii
How to Read an Essay
1(12)
Linking Reading and Writing
1(1)
How Does Reading Help You Write?
1(1)
How Does Writing Help You Read?
2(1)
Using the Active Reading Process
3(1)
What Is the Difference Between an Active and a Passive Reader?
3(1)
What Is the Active Reading Process?
3(2)
Prereading
3(1)
Reading
4(1)
Rereading
5(1)
Practicing Active Reading: An Annotated Sample
5(7)
On Cloning a Human Being
6(6)
Lewis Thomas
Some Things to Remember
12(1)
How to Write an Essay
13(19)
Writing: An Overview
13(1)
Choosing a Subject
13(1)
Having a Purpose
13(1)
Defining an Audience
14(1)
Prewriting
14(10)
Writing on an Assigned Topic
15(3)
Creating Your Own Topic
18(1)
Gathering Information
18(4)
Defining a Thesis Statement
22(1)
Writing a Thesis Statement
23(1)
Writing a Draft
24(6)
Organizing Your Essay
24(1)
Structuring the Body
24(2)
Beginning and Ending
26(2)
Checking Your Essay's Structure
28(2)
Some Things to Remember
30(2)
How to Revise an Essay
32(12)
What Does Revising Involve?
32(1)
Analyzing Your Own Writing
33(4)
Rethinking the Larger Issues
33(1)
Judging Length
34(1)
Analyzing the Structure of Your Paper
34(2)
Looking at Sentences and Word Choices
36(1)
Keeping a Revision Log
36(1)
Using Peer Readers
37(2)
Peer Editing
37(1)
Group Editing
38(1)
Using Your School's Writing Center or a Writing Tutor
39(1)
Using an OWL
39(1)
Conferencing with Your Instructor
40(1)
Proofreading Your Paper
41(1)
Is an Error-Free Paper an ``A'' Paper?
42(1)
Some Things to Remember
42(2)
Writers At Work
44(535)
A Student Writer
44(7)
Finding a Topic and Prewriting
44(2)
Drafting
46(1)
Revising
47(1)
The Watermelon Wooer
48(3)
Tina Burton
A Professional Writer
51(10)
Finding a Topic and Prewriting
51(3)
Drafting
54(1)
Revising
55(1)
Caught in the Widow's Web
56(5)
Gordon Grice
Gathering And Using Examples
61(49)
Preparing to Write
61(5)
What Role Do Examples Play in Writing?
61(1)
Where Can You Find Details and Examples?
62(1)
How Do You Gather Details and Examples from Your Experiences?
63(1)
How Do You Gather Information from Outside Sources?
64(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
65(1)
Writing
66(2)
How Many Examples Are Enough?
66(1)
How Do You Fit Examples into the Structure of an Essay?
67(1)
Drafting Suggestions
68(1)
Revising
68(2)
How Do You Revise When Using Examples?
68(2)
Revising Suggestions
70(1)
Sample Student Essay
70(2)
Looking for Love
71(1)
Frank Smite
Some Things to Remember
72(1)
Example as a Literary Strategy
72(2)
Night
73(1)
Bret Lott
Reading for Examples
74(1)
from The Language Instinct
74(1)
Steven Pinker
Responding to a Visual
75(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
76(1)
Visiting the Web
76(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
77(33)
The Name Is Mine
79(4)
Anna Quindlen
Cut
83(7)
Bob Greene
Westbury Court
90(6)
Edwidge Danticat
One of the Girls
96(6)
Leslie Heywood
Shooting an Elephant
102(8)
George Orwell
Narration
110(51)
Preparing to Write
110(3)
What Is Narration and What Are its Elements?
110(1)
What Are the Common Forms of Narrative Writing?
111(1)
What Do You Write About If Nothing Ever Happened to You?
111(1)
What Do You Include in a Narrative?
112(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
113(1)
Writing
113(4)
How Do You Structure a Narrative?
113(2)
How Are Narratives Told?
115(1)
How Do You Write Dialogue?
115(2)
Drafting Suggestions
117(1)
Revising
117(2)
How Do You Revise a Narrative?
117(1)
Revising Suggestions
118(1)
Sample Student Essay
119(3)
The Ruby Slippers
121(1)
Hope Zucker
Some Things to Remember
122(1)
Narration as a Literary Strategy
122(2)
Waiting
123(1)
Peggy Mcnally
Reading Narration
124(1)
Blue Hen's Chicks
124(1)
S. E. Schlosser
Responding to a Visual
125(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
126(1)
Visiting the Web
126(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
126(35)
Salvation
128(5)
Langston Hughes
Sister Monroe
133(5)
Maya Angelou
Facing Famine
138(7)
Tom Hanies
Marina
145(8)
Judith Ortiz Cofer
Lockdown
153(8)
Evans D. Hopkins
Description
161(50)
Preparing to Write
161(4)
What Is Description?
161(1)
If Recording Sense Impressions in Words Is Difficult, Why Bother?
162(1)
What Is the Difference Between Objective and Subjective Description?
163(1)
What Do You Include in and What Do You Exclude from a Description?
164(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
165(1)
Writing
165(2)
How Do You Describe an Object or a Place?
165(1)
How Do You Describe a Person?
165(1)
How Do You Organize a Description?
166(1)
Drafting Suggestions
167(1)
Revising
167(2)
How Do You Revise a Description?
167(1)
Keeping Focused
168(1)
Revising Suggestions
168(1)
Sample Student Essay
169(2)
Natalie
170(1)
Nadine Resnick
Some Things to Remember
171(1)
Example as a Literary Strategy
171(2)
Traveling to Town
172(1)
Duane BigEagle
Reading Description
173(1)
from Bleak House
174(1)
Charles Dickens
Responding to a Visual
174(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
175(1)
Visiting the Web
175(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
176(35)
A Pen by the Phone
177(4)
Debra Anne Davis
The Way to Rainy Mountain
181(7)
N. Scott Nowaday
Nameless, Tennessee
188(7)
William Least Heat Moon
The Village Watchman
195(8)
Terry Tempest Williams
The Inheritance of Tools
203(8)
Scott Russell Sanders
Division And Classification
211(56)
Preparing to Write
211(4)
What Is Division?
211(1)
What Is Classification?
212(2)
How Do You Choose a Subject?
214(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
214(1)
Writing
215(2)
How Do You Divide or Classify a Subject?
215(1)
How Do You Structure a Division or Classification Essay?
216(1)
Drafting Suggestions
217(1)
Revising
217(2)
How Do You Revise a Division or Classification?
217(1)
Revising Suggestions
218(1)
Sample Student Essay
219(2)
Riding the Rails: The American Hobo
220(1)
Evan James
Some Things to Remember
221(1)
Division and Classification as a Literary Strategy
221(2)
How Do I Love Thee?
222(1)
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Reading Division and Classification
223(1)
from Grammar in the Classroom
223(1)
Mark Lester
Responding to a Visual
224(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
224(1)
Visiting the Web
225(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
226(41)
What's in Your Toothpaste?
221(11)
David Bodanis
In Defense of Talk Shows
232(4)
Barbara Ehrenreich
How We Listen to Music
236(7)
Aaron Cope Land
The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria
243(7)
Judith Ortiz Cofer
The Value of Children: A Taxonomical Essay
250(8)
Bernard R. Berelson
What Are You Afraid of?
258(9)
Joseph Epstein
Comparison And Contrast
267(52)
Preparing to Write
267(4)
What Is Comparison and Contrast?
267(3)
How Do You Choose a Subject?
270(1)
Do You Always Find Both Similarities and Differences?
270(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
271(1)
Writing
271(3)
How Do You Structure a Comparison and Contrast?
271(2)
How Do You Use Analogy, Metaphor, and Simile?
273(1)
Drafting Suggestions
274(1)
Revising
274(2)
How Do You Revise a Comparison and Contrast Essay?
274(1)
Revising Suggestions
275(1)
Sample Student Essay
276(4)
Minimizing the Guesswork in a Library Search
278(2)
Alicia Gray
Some Things to Remember
280(1)
Comparison and Contrast as a Literary Strategy
280(2)
Coca-Cola and Coco Frio
281(1)
Martin Espada
Reading Comparison and Contrast
282(1)
from Oranges
283(1)
John Mcphee
Responding to a Visual
283(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
283(1)
Visiting the Web
284(1)
Exploring on Your Own
284(35)
Guavas
286(4)
Esmeralda Santiago
The Transaction: Two Writing Processes
290(4)
William Zinsser
Academic Selves
294(5)
Mary Pipher
Neat People vs. Sloppy People
299(4)
Suzanne Britt
The Color of Love
303(6)
Danzy Senna
Virtual Love
309(10)
Meghan Daum
Process
319(56)
Preparing to Write
319(3)
What Is Process?
319(1)
How Do You Choose a Subject to Write About?
320(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
321(1)
Writing
322(1)
How Do You Structure a Process Paper?
322(1)
Drafting Suggestions
323(1)
Revising
323(2)
How Do You Revise a Process Essay?
323(2)
Revising Suggestions
325(1)
Sample Student Essay
325(3)
How to Play Dreidel
326(2)
Julie Anne HalbFish
Some Things to Remember
328(1)
Process as a Literary Strategy
328(2)
Recipe
329(1)
Janice Mirikitani
Reading Process
330(2)
Career Women.Com / Getting the Interview Edge ``Apprentice-Style''
330(2)
Responding to a Visual
332(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
332(1)
Visiting the Web
333(1)
Exploring on Your Own
333(42)
My Daily Dives in the Dumpster
335(6)
Lars Eighner
Revision and Life: Take It from the Top---Again
341(5)
Nora Ephron
Don't Just Stand There
346(7)
Diane Cole
The Culture of Martyrdom
353(6)
Diane Brooks
Into the Loop: How to Get the Job You Want after Graduation
359(9)
Charlie Drozdyk
Stripped for Parts
368(7)
Jennifer Kahn
Cause And Effect
375(52)
Preparing to Write
375(4)
What Is Cause and Effect?
375(2)
Why Do You Write a Cause-and-Effect Analysis?
377(1)
How Do You Choose a Subject?
378(1)
How Do You Isolate and Evaluate Causes and Effects?
378(1)
Prewriting Suggestions
378(1)
Writing
379(2)
How Do You Structure a Cause-and-Effect Analysis?
379(1)
Drafting Suggestions
380(1)
Revising
381(2)
How Do You Revise a Cause-and-Effect Essay?
381(2)
Revising Suggestions
383(1)
Sample Student Essay
383(3)
The Influence of Televised Violence on Children
385(1)
Cathy Ferguson
Some Things to Remember
386(1)
Cause and Effect as a Literary Strategy
386(2)
Barbie Doll
387(1)
Marge Piercy
Reading Cause and Effect
388(1)
www.Emedicinehealth.com / What Causes Migraine Headaches?
388(1)
Responding to a Visual
389(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
390(1)
Visiting the Web
390(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
391(36)
My Wood
392(5)
E. M. Forster
The Origins of Anorexia Nervosa
397(5)
Joan Jacobs Brumberg
On Teenagers and Tattoos
402(5)
Andres Martin
Black Men and Public Space
407(5)
Brent Staples
Dreadlocked
412(5)
Veronica Chambers
The Trouble with Fries
417(10)
Malcolm Gladwell
Definition
427(46)
Preparing to Write
427(3)
What Is Definition?
427(1)
What is the Difference Between Denotation and Connotation?
428(1)
How Much Do You Include in a Definition?
428(2)
Prewriting Suggestions
430(1)
Writing
430(1)
How Do You Structure a Definition Essay?
430(1)
Drafting Suggestions
431(1)
Revising
431(2)
How Do You Revise a Definition Essay?
431(2)
Revising Suggestions
433(1)
Some Things to Remember
433(1)
Sample Student Essay
434(2)
Infallible
435(1)
Sherry Heck
Definition as a Literary Strategy
436(2)
The Foot
437(1)
Alice Jones
Reading Definition
438(1)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder / Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia
439(1)
Responding to a Visual
439(1)
Reading and Writing about Images
440(1)
Visiting the Web
440(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
441(32)
How Can Someone Who Lives in Insane Luxury Be a Star in Today's World?
442(5)
Ben Stein
I want a Wife
447(4)
Judy Brady
The People in Me
451(5)
Robin D. G. Kelley
Mother Tongue
456(7)
Amy Tan
Mess
463(5)
John Hollander
The Female Body
468(5)
Margaret Atwood
Argument And Persuasion
473(66)
Preparing to Write
473(5)
What Is the Difference Between Argument and Persuasion?
473(1)
What Do You Already Know about Arguing and Persuading?
474(2)
How Do You Analyze Your Audience?
476(1)
What Does It Take to Persuade Your Reader?
476(2)
Prewriting Suggestions
478(1)
Writing
478(4)
How Do You Make Sure That Your Argument Is Logical?
478(1)
How Do You Structure an Argument?
479(2)
Drafting Suggestions
481(1)
Revising
482(2)
How Do You Revise an Argumentative or Persuasive Essay?
482(1)
Revising Suggestions
483(1)
Sample Student Essay
484(2)
Lowering the Cost of a College Education
485(1)
Beth Jaffe
Some Things to Remember
486(1)
Argument and Persuasion as a Literary Strategy
486(2)
Dulce Decorum Est
487(1)
Wilfred Owen
Reading Argument and Persuasion
488(1)
www.teenadvice.about.com / Top 5 Reasons Youth Should Vote
489(1)
Responding to a Visual
489(2)
Reading and Writing about Images
490(1)
Visiting the Web
491(1)
Looking for Writing Suggestions
491(2)
Debate: Is A College Education Worth Its Cost?
493(10)
The Value of a College Degree
494(5)
Katherine Porter
The Case Against College
499(4)
Linda Lee
Debate: Are College Grades Inflated?
503(14)
When I Was Young an A Was an A
504(4)
Ronna Vanderslice
The Dangerous Myth of Grade Inflation
508(9)
Alfie Kohn
Debate: Should Murderers Be Executed?
517(22)
Memoirs of a Dead Man Walking
518(5)
Sister Helen Prejean
What Do Murderers Deserve?
523
David Gelernter
Have a Dream
521(12)
Martin Luther King Jr.
None of This Is Fair
533(6)
Richard Rodriguez
Combinations At Work
539(40)
A Modest Proposal
540(10)
Jonathan Swift
The Death of the Moth
550(5)
Virginia Woolf
Once More to the Lake
555(8)
E. B. White
On Keeping a Notebook
563(8)
Joan Didion
The Singer Solution to World Poverty
571(8)
Peter Singer
Appendix: Finding, Using, And Documenting Sources
579(35)
Finding Sources
579(12)
Using Reference Books as a Starting Point; Encyclopedias and Dictionaries
580(1)
Finding Books: Your Library's Catalog
581(1)
Choosing the Right Subject Heading
582(2)
Finding Sources on the Web
584(1)
Choosing a Search Engine
585(1)
Web Searching Tips
585(1)
Using Your Search for Subject Headings and Keywords to Revise Your Topic
586(1)
Finding Magazines, Journals, and Newspapers
586(3)
Finding Government Documents
589(1)
Interviewing
590(1)
Using Sources
591(2)
Evaluating Sources
591(1)
Knowing How Much Quotation to Use
592(1)
Working Quotations into Your Text
593(1)
Documenting Your Sources
593(9)
Plagiarism, Academic Dishonesty, and the Misuse of Sources
594(2)
Acknowledging Sources in Your Text
596(2)
The ``List of Works Cited'' or ``References''
598(4)
Electronic Sources
602(1)
Annotated Sample Student Research Paper (MLA Documentation Style)
603(11)
The Cell Phone and Its Hold on Today's Youth
604(10)
Eric Miller
Glossary And Ready Reference 614(16)
Credits 630(4)
Index 634

Excerpts

Preface The Prentice Hall Reader is predicated on two premises: that reading plays a vital role in learning how to write and that writing and reading can best be organized around the traditional division of discourse into a number of structural patterns. Such a division is not the only way that the forms of writing can be classified, but it does have several advantages. First, practice in these structural patterns encourages students to organize knowledge and to see the ways in which information can be conveyed. How else does the mind know except by classifying, comparing, defining, or seeking cause and effect relationships? Second, the most common use of these patterns occurs in writing done in academic courses. There students are asked to narrate a chain of events, to describe an artistic style, to classify plant forms, to compare two political systems, to tell how a laboratory experiment was performed, to analyze why famine occurs in Africa, to define a philosophical concept, or to argue for or against building a space station. Learning how to structure papers using these patterns is an exercise that has immediate application in students' other academic work. Finally, because the readings use these patterns as structural devices, they offer an excellent way in which to integrate reading into a writing course. Students can see the patterns at work and learn how to use them to become more effective writers and better, more efficient readers. What Is New in the Eighth Edition? The eighth edition of The Prentice Hall Reader features 60 essays, 17 of which are new, 11 papers written by student writers, and 9 poems or short, short stories that show the organizational strategies at work. New to this edition are 9 selections which allow the students to see how writing and reading complement each other. As in the previous editions, the readings are chosen on the basis of several criteria: how well they demonstrate a particular pattern of organization, appeal to a freshman audience, and promote interesting and appropriate discussion and writing activities. The eighth edition of The Prentice Hall Reader includes a number of new features: + Detailed treatment of the writing process in three opening chapters How to Read an Essay How to Write an Essay How to Revise an Essay + New Writers at Work” which includes two examples of writing–one student and one professional--from the pre-writing stage through drafting and then revision. + New introductions to each of the nine chapters treating the organizational modes subdivided now into prewriting, writing, and revising. Each offers clear and succinct advice on how to write that particular type of paragraph or essay. The introductions anticipate questions, provide answers, include checklists of the major concerns students should have when writing. + New quick-reference checklists for writers in each chapter + New section For Further Study” after each reading that includes activities focusing on grammar and writing, on working together, on seeing other modes at work, on finding connections, and on exploring the Web + New Reading for”–an example of how learning to write in each of the modes or strategies helps you in reading a section that uses that mode or strategy. + New ”Responding to a Visual” and Reading and Writing about Images” in each chapter that invites analysis of and writing about a visual image. + New Visiting the Web” in each chapter that invites students to pursue a Web-based problem and to write about it. + New additional Writing Suggestions” in each chapter. The text includes hundreds of possible writing topics + New Chapter 10 on Combinations at Work,” a mini-anthology of classic essays that show a mixture of strategies at work. + New student research paper on cell phone use + New section explaining and illustrating plagiarism + New Ready Reference” section keyed to instructor's proofreading a


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