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Primate Behavioral Ecology,9780205444328

Primate Behavioral Ecology

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780205444328

ISBN10:
0205444326
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $78.40

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Summary

Primate Behavioral Ecology Third Edition Karen B. Strier Overview: Primate Behavioral Ecology, described as "an engaging, cutting-edge exposition," incorporates exciting new discoveries in its introduction to the field and its applications of behavioral ecology to primate conservation. One reviewer declares, "I can't imagine teaching a course on primate behavior or ecology without this text." Another reviewer states, "Overall, the synthesis and integration are outstandinghellip;this is one of the best organized textbooks that I have ever seen, in any fieldhellip;it is clear that Strier is actively involved in the forefront and not some armchair type!" Another adds, "Strier's writing style is a huge asset to keeping current information comprehensible for the target audience." Like no other text on the market, this comprehensive text integrates the basics of evolutionary and ecological approaches and new noninvasive molecular and hormonal techniques to the study of primate behavior with up-to-date coverage of how different primates behave. Examples are drawn from the "classic" primate field studies and more recent studies on previously neglected species, illustrating the vast behavioral variation that we now know exists and the gaps in our knowledge that future studies will fill. ________________________________________________________________________ Features: bull; bull;Includes long-term studies across the primate order, including "New World Monkeys" and prosimians as well as "Old World Monkeys," which demonstrate much greater diversity than baboons, macaques, or apes encompass. bull;Covers both social behavior and ecological adaptations. bull;Emphasizes the interplay between theory, observation, and conservation issues throughout. bull;Illustrates primates and behavioral and ecological principles through more than 150 photos and 50 graphs and diagrams. bull;Discusses consequences of behavior patterns, such as how dispersal affects gene flow and why fragmented populations are at risk of extinction. bull;Integrates classic studies, theoretical papers, and review articles with current referencesnearly 1,000 in all.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Introduction to Primate Studies
1(36)
Primates as Study Subjects
8(2)
Descriptive Studies
10(16)
Anthropocentric Perspectives
11(4)
Comparative Biology
15(1)
Early Classification Schemes
16(7)
Field and Captive Studies
23(1)
Box 1.1 Clues from Captivity
24(2)
Evolutionary Models and Problem-Oriented Studies
26(9)
Sociobiology and Behavioral Ecology
27(2)
Testing Predictions about Behavioral Adaptations
29(6)
Conservation Applications
35(2)
Traits, Trends, and Taxonomy
37(36)
Box 2.1 The Notable Neocortex
38(1)
Distinguishing Traits
39(11)
Allometric Scaling of Brain and Body Size
40(4)
Other Morphological Traits
44(6)
Cladistic Analyses
50(18)
Taxonomic Considerations
50(3)
Major Taxonomic Groups
53(9)
Box 2.2 Fundamentals of Food Processing
62(4)
Systematics
66(2)
Phylogenetic Analyses of Behavior
68(5)
Evidence Related to Diet
68(1)
Evidence Related to Ranging Patterns
68(1)
Evidence Related to Mating Systems
69(1)
Evidence Related to Dispersal Patterns
70(3)
Primates Past to Present
73(26)
Evolutionary History
74(2)
Primate Diversity in the Past
76(11)
Primate Origins
76(2)
Biogeography and Barriers
78(1)
Miocene Monkeys and Apes
79(1)
Box 3.1 Mosaic Nature of Human Evolution
80(1)
Pliocene Highlights
81(1)
Pleistocene Glaciations
82(1)
Holocene
83(4)
Interpreting Diversity Today
87(12)
Intraspecific Variation
88(1)
Local Population Variability
89(3)
Box 3.2 Hybrid Baboons
92(2)
Box 3.3 Lucky Lemurs
94(3)
Implications for Primate Behavioral Ecology
97(2)
Evolution and Social Behavior
99(42)
Natural Selection
101(20)
Sources of Genetic Variation
102(4)
Box 4.1 MHC Genes
106(5)
Genetic versus Environmental Influences
111(7)
Box 4.2 Menopause
118(3)
Kin Selection and Reciprocal Altruism
121(15)
Altruism and the Challenge of Group Selection
122(1)
Box 4.3 Multi-Level Selection
123(2)
Selfish Benefits of Helping Kin
125(5)
Benefits of Helping Nonkin
130(6)
Individual Strategies and Social Organizations
136(5)
Conflict and Cooperation among Same-Sexed Individuals
137(3)
Conflicts between the Sexes
140(1)
Evolution and Sex
141(38)
Sexual Selection
143(4)
Sexual Dimorphism
147(1)
Phylogenetic Constraints
147(1)
Ecological Constraints
147(1)
Mating Patterns
148(20)
Mating Patterns When Females Are Solitary
149(1)
Box 5.1 Gibbon Games and Tarsier Tactics
150(7)
Mating Patterns When Females Live in Groups
157(11)
Female Mating Strategies
168(7)
Sperm and Fertilization
169(1)
Food and Safety from Predators
169(1)
Allies against Aggression
169(1)
Parental Investment
170(1)
Good Genes
171(1)
Sexual Signals
171(4)
Male Rank and Reproductive Success
175(4)
Food, Foraging, and Females
179(30)
Food Quality
182(12)
Energy and Nutrients
183(1)
Digestibility and Edibility
183(4)
Box 6.1 Forest Pharmacy
187(2)
Body Size Energetics and Turnover Rates
189(1)
Reproductive Energetics
189(5)
The Spatial Distribution of Food
194(4)
Patch Size and Defensibility
195(2)
Effects of Patch Density on Ranging Patterns
197(1)
The Temporal Availability of Food Resources
198(7)
Behavioral Adjustments to Food Seasonality
199(3)
Box 6.2 The Power of Food
202(2)
Reproductive Seasonality
204(1)
Interpreting Diets and Their Behavioral Correlates
205(4)
Evaluating ``Critical Functions''
205(2)
Effects of Altered Habitats
207(2)
Female Strategies
209(34)
Ecology of Female Relationships
210(5)
Types of Relationships
211(1)
Within- and Between-Group Competition
212(3)
Social Dynamics in Female Groups
215(20)
Matrilocal Societies
215(1)
Box 7.1 Mysterious Matrilines and Market Theory
216(11)
Life without Kin
227(8)
Population Consequences of Female Strategies
235(8)
Habitat Fragmentation and Saturation
236(3)
Reproductive Implications
239(1)
Manipulating Sex Ratios
240(3)
Male Strategies
243(29)
Ecology of Male Relationships
245(6)
Types of Relationships
245(1)
Box 8.1 Using and Misusing Infants
245(2)
Within- and Between-Group Competition
247(4)
Social Dynamics among Males
251(17)
Patrilocal Societies
252(8)
When Males Disperse
260(4)
Box 8.2 Beyond the Group
264(3)
Males in Pairbonded Societies
267(1)
Population Dynamics
268(4)
Genetic and Demographic Correlates
269(2)
Male Life Histories
271(1)
Developmental Stages Through the Life Span
272(28)
Fertilization to Birth
273(1)
Infancy
274(10)
Maternal Care
277(1)
Paternal Care
278(1)
Alloparental Care
279(2)
Box 9.1 Parental Prolactin
281(3)
Weaning Conflict
284(3)
Juvenile Challenges
287(6)
Staying Alive
287(3)
Social Skills
290(3)
Puberty
293(2)
Adulthood and Aging
295(3)
Population Consequences of Life Histories
298(2)
Communication and Cognition
300(33)
Components of Communication Systems
303(1)
Modes of Primate Communication
304(15)
Tactile Communication
305(2)
Visual Communication
307(2)
Olfactory and Gustatory Communication
309(3)
Vocal Communication
312(7)
Cognition
319(10)
Learning and Imitation
319(2)
Ecological Intelligence
321(4)
Social Intelligence
325(4)
Implications for the Ethical Treatment of Primates
329(4)
Box 10.1 Rehabilitation, Reintroduction, and Sanctuary
330(3)
Community Ecology
333(23)
Primate Communities
334(10)
Box 11.1 Primates and Parasites
334(2)
Niche Divergence
336(1)
Polyspecific Associations
336(8)
Predator--Prey Interactions
344(4)
Box 11.2 Predatory Perspectives
344(1)
Primates as Predators
345(2)
Primates as Prey
347(1)
Primate--Plant Interactions
348(5)
Pollination
349(1)
Seed Dispersal
350(3)
Conservation of Communities
353(3)
Specialists, Generalists, and Social Responses
354(1)
Preserving Diversity
355(1)
Conservation
356(20)
Threats to Primates
357(7)
Habitat Disturbances
357(4)
Hunting Pressures
361(3)
Conservation Policies
364(5)
Economic Incentives
364(2)
Increasing Public Awareness
366(1)
Nongovernmental Organizations
367(1)
Box 12.1 The Primates' People
367(2)
Noninvasive Research
369(5)
Reproductive Biology
370(3)
From Paternity to Population Genetics
373(1)
The Next Millennium
374(2)
Appendix: Primate Names 376(12)
Bibliography 388(44)
Glossary 432(10)
Name Index 442(4)
Subject Index 446


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