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Principles of Biomedical Ethics,9780195143324

Principles of Biomedical Ethics

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780195143324

ISBN10:
0195143329
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/15/2001
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press
List Price: $56.48
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Summary

This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the shift of advanced material on theory to the back of the book, this heavily revised introductory chapter will make it easier for the wide range of students entering bioethics courses to use this text. Another important change is the increased emphasis on character and moral agency, drawing the distinction between agents and actions. The sections on truth telling, disclosure of bad news, privacy, conflicts of interest, and research on human subjects have also been throughly reworked. The four core chapters on principles (respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice) and the chapter on professional-patient relationships retain their familiar structure, but the authors have completely updated their content to reflect developments in philosophical analysis as well as in research, medicine, and health care. Throughout, they have used a number of actual cases to illuminate and to test their theory, method, and framework of principles.

Table of Contents

PART I
Moral Norms
1(25)
Ethics and Morality
1(8)
Moral Dilemmas
9(3)
A Framework of Moral Principles
12(2)
The Prima Facie Nature of Moral Norms
14(1)
Specifying Principles and Rules
15(3)
Balancing Principles and Rules
18(5)
Conclusion
23(3)
Moral Character
26(31)
Moral Virtues
26(4)
Virtues in Professional Roles
30(2)
Five Focal Virtues
32(7)
The Relationship of Moral Virtues and Moral Principles
39(1)
Moral Ideals
39(4)
Moral Excellence
43(8)
Conclusion
51(6)
PART II
Respect for Autonomy
57(56)
The Nature of Autonomy
57(12)
The Capacity for Autonomous Choice
69(8)
The Meaning and Justification of Informed Consent
77(3)
Disclosure
80(8)
Understanding
88(5)
Voluntariness
93(5)
A Framework of Standards for Surrogate Decision-Making
98(5)
Conclusion
103(10)
Nonmaleficence
113(52)
The Concept of Nonmaleficence
114(5)
Distinctions and Rules Governing Nontreatment
119(14)
Optional Treatments and Obligatory Treatments
133(6)
Killing and Letting Die
139(5)
The Justification of Interntionally Arranged Deaths
144(8)
Protecting Incompetent Patients
152(5)
Conclusion
157(8)
Beneficence
165(60)
The Concept of Beneficence
166(1)
Obligatory and Ideal Benefience
167(9)
Paternalism: Conflicts Between Beneficence and Autonomy
176(18)
Balancing Benefits, Costs, and Risks
194(12)
The Value and Quality of Life
206(8)
Conclusion
214(11)
Justice
225(58)
The Concept of Justice
226(4)
Theories of Justice
230(5)
Fair Opportunity
235(4)
The Right to a Decent Minimum of Health Care
239(11)
The Allocation of Health Care Resources
250(3)
Rationing and Setting Priorities
253(11)
Rationing Scarce Treatments to Patients
264(8)
Conclusion
272(11)
Professional--Patient Relationships
283(54)
Veracity
283(10)
Privacy
293(10)
Confidentiality
303(9)
Fidelity
312(7)
The Dual Roles of Physician and Investigator
319(8)
Conclusion
327(10)
PART III
Moral Theories
337(47)
Criteria for Theory Construction
338(2)
Utilitarianism: Consequence-Based Theory
340(8)
Kantianism: Obligation-Based Theory
348(7)
Liberal Individualism: Rights-Based Theory
355(7)
Communitarianism: Community-Based Theory
362(7)
Ethics of Care: Relationship-Based Accounts
369(7)
Convergence Across Theories
376(1)
Conclusion
377(7)
Method and Moral Justification
384(31)
Justification in Ethics
384(1)
Top-Down Models: Theory and Application
385(6)
Bottom-Up Models: Cases and Inductive Generalization
391(6)
An Integrated Model: Coherence Theory
397(4)
Common-Morality Theory
401(7)
Conclusion
408(7)
Appendix: Cases in Biomedical Ethics 415(18)
Index 433


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