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Proactive Security Administration,9780131421325

Proactive Security Administration

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780131421325

ISBN10:
0131421328
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2011
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $16.67
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    Proactive Security Administration




Summary

Proactive Security Administration presents the current theory and practice of security operations in both the public and private sectors. Organizations must implement a comprehensive strategic plan for security operations in order to survive and thrive in the competitive global economy. This text presents security as policies, operations and resources directed to the protection of assets and clients. The impact of the 9/11 attacks on public and private security is an important focus of the text. As well, the influence of technology on security in relation to protection and threat assessment is an important focus. Accordingly, homeland security, cybercrime and internet security, digital protection systems, and internal and external fraud are examined. Model policies and procedures are presented throughout the book, as well as a number of case problems that may be used for in-class exercises.

Unlike other texts, Proactive Security Administration focuses on needs and services and less on whether security is provided by the public police or a private security company. The reality is that many public police departments and investigative services have state powers directed for security protection and investigation of crimes related to certain governmental services.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
About the Authors xiii
Introduction xv
Chapter 1 Development of Security in the United States 1(23)
The Colonial Period
2(3)
Security Models during and after World War II
5(3)
The 1960's
8(1)
Professional Associations
9(1)
Technological Innovations in Security
10(2)
The Not So Distant Past
12(1)
Locks and Alarms and Perimeter Security
12(2)
Communications Technology
14(1)
Closed-Circuit Television
15(1)
Computer Technology
16(1)
Magnetic Cards
17(1)
Data Banks
18(1)
Security and the Internet
18(1)
Comprehensive International Security
19(1)
The Post 9/11 Era
20(4)
Chapter 2 Proactive Security Administration and Planning 24(26)
Security Services Typologies
26(2)
Government Power
28(3)
Planning in General
31(2)
Types of Plans
33(4)
General Planning Process
37(1)
Strategic Planning
38(4)
Risk Management
42(3)
Cost-Benefit Analysis
45(1)
Emergency Planning
46(1)
Role of Leadership
46(4)
Chapter 3 Legal Bases for the Security Function 50(26)
U.S. Legal System
50(1)
Forms and Sources of Law
51(3)
Structure of U.S. Court Systems
54(2)
Legal Basis for Security Services
56(1)
Criminal Liability
57(3)
Tort Liability
60(4)
Contract Liability
64(1)
Statutory Liability
64(3)
Legal Limitations upon Performance of the Security Function
67(9)
Chapter 4 Security Assets-Humans and Property 76(29)
Perimeter Security
77(3)
To Guard or Not to Guard
80(1)
Contract vs. Proprietary Agencies
81(2)
Internal Access Controls
83(2)
Rules and Regulations and Actual Practice
85(1)
Security Planning by Environmental Design and Crime Prevention
86(2)
Security Service of Special Populations and Situations
88(12)
Recreation Security
100(1)
Gaming Security
101(4)
Chapter 5 Securing Critical Assets-Information and Intellectual Property 105(20)
It's the Information Age
105(2)
Information Security
107(1)
Information Security Policies and Procedures
108(17)
Chapter 6 Investigation of Criminal Security Incidents 125(26)
Investigation
125(3)
Statistics on Crime and Security Incidents
128(1)
Investigation Process
129(22)
Chapter 7 Emergency Management 151(26)
Emergency Planning
152(4)
Activation and Command Center
156(3)
Incident Command System
159(3)
Weapons of Mass Destruction
162(1)
WMD and Terrorism
162(1)
Types of Weapons of Mass Destruction
163(4)
WMD Impact on Emergency Responders
167(1)
Threat Analysis
168(2)
Drill and Training
170(7)
Chapter 8 Human Resource Management in Security Services 177(33)
Basic Premises
177(1)
Job Analysis
178(1)
General Overview of Hiring Practices
179(1)
Staffing
180(3)
Employment Considerations
183(11)
Major Federal Laws and Human Resource Administration
194(3)
Family Medical Leave Act
197(1)
Disciplinary Actions and Reward Systems
197(3)
Employee Evaluation and Rewards
200(4)
Collective Bargaining
204(6)
Chapter 9 Training 210(19)
General Overview of Security and Law Enforcement Training
211(1)
Pre-Service/Basic
211(7)
Training for Investigations Personnel
218(1)
Specific Programs for All Levels and Positions
219(2)
Executive Development
221(1)
Training for Level II and III Agencies
221(2)
How to Train
223(6)
Chapter 10 Global and Homeland Security Issues 229(20)
Global Operations
229(1)
International Relations
230(1)
International Crime Issues
231(2)
Transnational Crime Issues
233(1)
International Terrorism
234(3)
Global Security Service Issues
237(2)
Executive Protection
239(1)
Continued Growth in Security Service Organizations
240(1)
Terrorism and Privacy
241(1)
Bureaucracy and Homeland Security
242(1)
Need for National Standards
243(1)
Cooperation between Law Enforcement and Security Services
244(5)
Index 249

Excerpts

We would like to thank the many students, officers, investigators, and administrators we have taught in college classrooms and training academies for their insight, ideas, and concerns on the administration of security service organizations. Today many are senior administrators and policy makers in police and security service organizations.A number of current administrators provided critical insights. They include Thomas Ryan, former State University of New York at Oswego police administrator and senior partner, CRJ Associates; Bernard Drobnicki, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; William Quirk, Munson Williams Proctor Institute and ASIS regional vice president; the security directors and police chiefs of the State University of New York; and Mark Fettinger and the training and management staff at the New York State Office of Public Safety, Division of Criminal Justice Services.Several members of industry organizations and law enforcement agencies have shared their knowledge and expertise with us over the years, much of which is reflected in this effort. They include Gary Gordon, executive director of the Economic Crime Institute and our colleague at Utica College; Robert Weaver and Robert Caltabiano of the U.S. Secret Service's New York Electronic Crime Task Force; Joseph Giordano and Chester Maciag of the Air Force Research Laboratory-Information Directorate; Michael Woodson of the High Technology Crime Investigators Association; and various members of the International Association of Financial Crimes Investigators, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, and the Digital Forensics Research Workshop.Special acknowledgements go those executives who teach at the Executive Development Institute of the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, who are always sharing new concepts and trends. They are Sue Riseling, University of Wisconsin; John King, Tufts University; Oliver Clark, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and David Zambri, University of Central Florida.George Curtis thanks his family-Lorraine, Michael, and Melissafor allowing him to usurp family time and for their support and encouragement in completing this task. He also appreciates the collaborative and supportive environment nurtured by colleagues at Utica College of Syracuse University, as well as the constant encouragement and support of graduate and undergraduate students.Bruce McBride gives thanks to his family for their patience and support: Barbara, Robbie, Megan, and Brian. He also says thank you to his colleagues and friends at Utica College of Syracuse University, and to the students of CRJ 300 (Spring 2004) who examined the concepts of this book.We would like to thank the reviewers of this edition: Neal Strehlow, Fox Valley Technical College; Norman Bates, Northeastern University; and David Mullins, Webster University. Our special thanks to our editor at Prentice-Hall, Sarah Holle, to the Prentice-Hall staff for their assistance in the development of this text and to our production editor, John Shannon, and the staff at Pine Tree Composition for all their assistance. This text has been much improved by their comments, criticisms, suggestions, and revisions.


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