CART

(0) items

Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections,9780136933687
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780136933687

ISBN10:
0136933688
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $86.66

Buy New Textbook

Currently Available, Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
$84.50

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 1/1/1999.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

Appropriate for Probation and Parole course at the sophomore/junior undergraduate level. Suggesting that all components of the criminal and juvenile justice systems are interrelated to varying degrees, this thorough study describes the objectives of probation and parole for criminally convicted adults and juveniles and whether these objectives are achieved. Helping students deepen their understanding of these philosophies through an examination of the history of parole and probation in the United States, it describes probation and parole programs, considers various classes of offenders, and highlights several problems associated with the selection and training of probation and parole officers - including their relationships with offender-clients. It remains the only major text of its kind to combine the standard topics in probation and parole with full coverage of recent trends in community corrections. Exceptionally well-organized, it emphasizes a legalistic approach, noting key legal cases where appropriate and including our most recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART I PROBATION: ORIGINS, FUNCTIONS, AND CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPMENTS 1(153)
CHAPTER 1 The Criminal Justice System: Components, Offenders, Programs, and Issues
1(32)
Introduction
2(3)
Chapter objectives
5(1)
An Overview of the Criminal Justice System
5(4)
Types of Offenses
9(2)
Felonies and misdemeanors
9(1)
Violent and property crimes
9(1)
The Uniform Crime Reports and the National Crime Victimization Survey
10(1)
Classifying Offenders
11(2)
Traditional offender categorizations
12(1)
Criminal Justice System Components: Locating Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections
13(9)
Law enforcement
13(1)
Prosecutorial decision making
14(5)
Courts and judges
19(1)
Corrections
20(2)
The Sentencing Process: Types of Sentencing and Sentencing Issues
22(9)
Functions of sentencing
22(2)
Types of sentencing
24(3)
Sentencing issues
27(4)
Questions for Review
31(2)
CHAPTER 2 Probation and Probationers: History, Philosophy, Goals, and Functions
33(38)
Introduction
34(2)
Probation Defined
36(1)
Probation Distinguished from Parole
37(1)
The History of Probation in the United States
38(6)
Judicial reprieves and releases on an offender's recognizance
38(1)
John Augustus, the father of probation in the United States
39(1)
The ideal vs. real dilemma: Philosophies in conflict
40(1)
Public reaction to probation
41(3)
The Philosophy of Probation
44(3)
Models for Dealing with Criminal Offenders
47(5)
The treatment or medical model
47(1)
The rehabilitation model
48(1)
The justice/due process model
49(1)
The just-deserts model
50(1)
The community model
50(2)
Functions of Probation
52(6)
Crime control
52(3)
Community reintegration
55(1)
Rehabilitation
55(1)
Punishment
55(2)
Deterrence
57(1)
A Profile of Probationers
58(9)
Probation decision making
63(4)
Probation Trends
67(2)
Questions for Review
69(2)
CHAPTER 3 The Presentence Investigation Report: Background, Preparation, and Functions
71(46)
Introduction
72(1)
The Role of Probation Officers in Sentencing
72(1)
Presentence Investigation (PSI) Reports
73(13)
State PSI reports
75(1)
Federal PSI reports
75(1)
The confidentiality of PSI reports
79(1)
The preparation of PSI reports
80(1)
Functions and uses of PSI reports
81(3)
The defendant's sentencing memorandum
84(1)
Privatizing PSI report preparation
85(1)
PSI reports and presumptive sentencing systems
85(1)
The Sentencing Hearing
86(2)
The inclusion of victim impact statements
86(2)
Aggravating and Mitigating Circumstances
88(2)
Aggravating circumstances
88(1)
Mitigating circumstances
89(1)
Changing Responsibilities of Probation Officers Resulting from Sentencing Reforms
90(2)
Probation and Public Risk: Predicting Dangerousness
92(13)
Assessing offender risk: A brief history
92(1)
Classification and its functions
93(5)
Types of risk assessment instruments
98(1)
False positives and false negatives
99(1)
The effectiveness of risk assessment devices
100(1)
Some applications of risk/needs measures
101(3)
Selective incapacitation
104(1)
Questions for Review
105(1)
Appendix: Sample PSI Report
105(12)
CHAPTER 4 Diversion and Probation Options: From Alternative Dispute Resolution to Boot Camps and Shock Probation
117(37)
Introduction
118(1)
Civil Mechanisms in Lieu of Diversion and Probation
119(5)
Alternative dispute resolution
120(3)
Victim-offender reconciliation projects
123(1)
Pretrial Diversion
124(3)
Unconditional and conditional diversion
124(1)
The history and philosophy of diversion
125(1)
Functions of diversion
125(1)
Factors influencing pretrial diversion
126(1)
Criticisms of diversion
127(1)
Standard Probation
127(2)
Intensive Supervised Probation (ISP)
129(10)
Three conceptual models of ISP
133(1)
The Idaho ISP program
134(1)
The South Carolina ISP program
135(2)
Criticisms of the Idaho and South Carolina ISP programs
137(2)
Shock Probation and Split Sentencing
139(6)
The philosophy and objectives of shock probation
141(3)
The effectiveness of shock probation
144(1)
Boot Camps
145(8)
Boot camps defined
146(1)
Goals of boot camps
146(2)
A profile of boot camp clientele
148(1)
Boot camp programs
148(3)
Jail boot camps
151(1)
The effectiveness of boot camps
152(1)
Boot camp costs compared with traditional incarceration
152(1)
Questions for Review
153(1)
PART II JAILS, PAROLE, AND PAROLE BOARDS 154(112)
CHAPTER 5 Jails and Prisons: Inmate Profiles and Contemporary Issues
154(38)
Introduction
155(1)
Jails and Jail Characteristics
155(4)
Workhouses
156(1)
The Walnut Street Jail
156(1)
Subsequent jail developments
157(1)
The number of jails in the United States
158(1)
The Functions of Jails
159(2)
A Profile of Jail Inmates
161(3)
Jail inmate characteristics
164(1)
Prisons and Prison Characteristics
164(4)
The Functions of Prisons
168(1)
Inmate Classification Systems
169(2)
A Profile of Prisoners in U.S. Prisons
171(5)
Some Jail and Prison Contrasts
176(1)
Selected Jail and Prison Issues
176(12)
Jail and prison overcrowding
177(2)
Violence and inmate discipline
179(2)
Jail and prison design and control
181(2)
Vocational/technical and educational programs in jails and prisons
183(2)
Jail and prison privatization
185(3)
The Role of Jails and Prisons in Probation and Parole Decision Making
188(3)
Questions for Review
191(1)
CHAPTER 6 Parole and Parolees: History, Philosophy, Goals, and Functions
192(29)
Introduction
193(1)
Parole Defined
193(1)
The Historical Context of Parole
194(2)
Parole and Alternative Sentencing Systems
196(9)
Indeterminate sentencing and parole
196(1)
Pros and cons of indeterminate sentencing in relation to parole
197(3)
The shift to determinate sentencing
200(5)
The Philosophy of Parole
205(1)
The Functions of Parole
206(1)
Offender reintegration
206(1)
Crime deterrence and control
206(1)
Decreasing prison and jail overcrowding
206(1)
Compensating for sentencing disparities
207(1)
Public safety and protection
207(1)
A Profile of Parolees in the United States
207(9)
Parole Trends
216(4)
Questions for Review
220(1)
CHAPTER 7 Judges and Parole Boards: Probation and Parole Revocation Actions
221(45)
Introduction
222(2)
Judicial Discretion in Granting Probation
224(1)
Parole Boards and Early Release Decision Making
225(23)
Parole board composition and diversity
230(1)
Functions of parole boards
231(2)
Parole board decision making and inmate control
233(3)
Parole board orientations
236(1)
Developing and implementing objective parole criteria
237(5)
Salient Factor Scores and risk assessments
242(4)
Parole agreements
246(2)
Types of Parole
248(2)
Prerelease
248(1)
Standard parole with conditions
249(1)
Intensive supervised parole
249(1)
Shock probation/shock parole
250(1)
Probation and Parole Revocation: Some Common Elements and Landmark Cases
250(5)
Morrissey v. Brewer (1972)
251(2)
Mempa v. Rhay (1967)
253(1)
Gagnon v. Scarpelli (1973)
253(1)
Bearden v. George (1983) and United States v. Bachsian (1993)
254(1)
Cataloging the Rights of Probationers and Parolees
255(9)
General probationer and parolee rights
255(1)
Probationer or parolee program conditions
256(3)
Judicial actions and probationer/parolee rights
259(2)
Parole board actions and probationer/parolee rights
261(3)
Questions for Review
264(2)
PART III COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS: CREATIVE ALTERNATIVES TO INCARCERATION 266(95)
CHAPTER 8 An Overview of Community Corrections: Types, Goals, and Functions
266(30)
Introduction
267(2)
What Is Community Corrections?
269(2)
Community Corrections Acts
271(1)
The Philosophy of Community Corrections
272(1)
The History of Community Corrections
273(1)
Characteristics of Community Corrections Programs
274(1)
Goals of Community Corrections
275(4)
Facilitating offender reintegration
276(1)
Fostering offender rehabilitation
276(1)
Providing an alternative range of offender punishments
277(1)
Heightening offender accountability
277(2)
Functions of Community Corrections
276(6)
Client monitoring and supervision to ensure program compliance
279(1)
Ensuring public safety
280(1)
Employment assistance
281(2)
Individual and group counseling
283(1)
Educational training and literacy services
284(1)
Networking with other community agencies and businesses
284(1)
Alleviating jail and prison overcrowding
285(1)
Selected Issues in Community Corrections
285(9)
Public resistance to locating community programs in communities (the NIMBY syndrome)
285(2)
Punishment versus rehabilitation and reintegration
287(1)
Public safety
288(1)
Net-widening
289(1)
Privatization
289(2)
Services delivery
291(1)
Education and training of staff
292(1)
Coping with special needs offenders
293(1)
Questions for Review
294(2)
CHAPTER 9 Home Confinement and Electronic Monitoring
296(26)
Introduction
297(1)
Home Confinement Programs
298(4)
Home confinement defined
298(1)
The early uses of home confinement
299(3)
The Goals of Home Confinement Programs
302(1)
A Profile of Home Confinement Clients
303(1)
Selected Issues in Home Confinement
304(3)
Is home confinement a punishment?
304(1)
Is home confinement constitutional?
305(1)
Does home confinement meet public safety needs?
306(1)
Is home confinement a crime deterrent?
307(1)
Electronic Monitoring
307(1)
Electronic Monitoring Defined
308(1)
Early Uses of Electronic Monitoring
308(1)
The Goals of Electronic Monitoring
309(1)
Types of Electronic Monitoring Systems
309(1)
Electronic Monitoring with Home Confinement
310(3)
A Profile of Electronic Monitoring Clients
313(1)
Selected Issues in Electronic Monitoring
314(6)
The ethics of electronic monitoring
314(2)
The constitutionality of electronic monitoring and client rights
316(2)
Punishment versus rehabilitation and reintegration
318(1)
Public safety
318(1)
Deterrence
318(1)
Privatization and net-widening
319(1)
The Future of Home Confinement and Electronic Monitoring
320(1)
Questions for Review
321(1)
CHAPTER 10 Work/Study Release, Furloughs, and Halfway Houses
322(39)
Introduction
323(1)
Work Release
324(8)
Work release defined
324(3)
The goals of work release programs
327(1)
The functions of work release
327(3)
A description of work releasees
330(1)
Determining inmate eligibility for work release programs
330(1)
Success rates of work release programs
331(1)
Study Release Programs
332(2)
Determining inmate eligibility for study release
333(1)
Advantages and disadvantages of study release programs
334(1)
Furlough Programs
334(5)
The goals of furlough programs
335(2)
The functions of furlough programs
337(1)
Determining inmate eligibility for furlough programs
338(1)
Weaknesses and strengths of furlough programs
338(1)
Day Reporting Centers
339(2)
Halfway Houses
341(8)
Halfway houses defined
341(2)
The functions of halfway houses
343(4)
A profile of halfway house clients
347(1)
Weaknesses and strengths of halfway house programs
348(1)
Community Residential Centers
349(3)
The philosophy and goals of community residential centers
350(1)
Day treatment centers
350(2)
Other Programs
352(8)
Fines
352(1)
Day fines
353(4)
Community service orders
357(1)
Forms of community service and restitution
358(1)
Restitution programs
358(2)
The effectiveness of community service and restitution
360(1)
Questions for Review
360(1)
PART IV PERSONNEL, WOMEN, SPECIAL NEEDS OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILES 361(106)
CHAPTER 11 Probation/Parole Officers, Paraprofessionals, and Volunteers
361(49)
Introduction
362(1)
Probation, Parole, and Corrections Officers: A Distinction
362(1)
The Organization and Operation of Probation and Parole Programs
363(8)
Selected criticisms of probation and parole programs
364(4)
Probation and parole officers: A profile
368(3)
Selection Requirements, Education, and Training for POs
371(13)
Assessment centers and staff effectiveness
373(2)
The use of firearms in probation and parole work
375(3)
Establishing negligence in training, job performance, and retention
378(6)
Probation and Parole Officer Caseloads
384(4)
Ideal caseloads
384(1)
Changing caseloads and officer effectiveness
385(1)
Caseload assignment and management models
386(2)
Officer/Client Interactions
388(2)
The Changing Probation/Parole Officer Role
390(1)
Probation/Parole Officer Labor Turnover
391(1)
Stress and Burnout in Probation/Parole Officer Role Performance
392(6)
Stress
392(1)
Sources of stress
393(4)
Alleviating stress and burnout
397(1)
The Role of Volunteers in Corrections
398(3)
Criticisms of Volunteers in Correctional Work
401(4)
On the ethics of using volunteers
402(1)
The legal liabilities of volunteers and agencies using them
403(2)
Paraprofessionals in Community Corrections
405(3)
The roles of paraprofessionals
405(2)
Legal liabilities of paraprofessionals
407(1)
Questions for Review
408(2)
CHAPTER 12 Females, Special Needs Offenders, and Juvenile Probationers and Parolees
410(57)
Introduction
411(1)
Female Probationers and Parolees: A Profile
411(1)
Special Programs and Services for Female Offenders
412(10)
Special Needs Offenders
422(5)
Drug/alcohol dependent offenders
422(1)
Mentally ill offenders
423(2)
Sex offenders and child sexual abusers
425(1)
Offenders with physical challenges
426(1)
AIDS: A growing problem in probation, parole, and community corrections
427(1)
Community Programs for Special Needs Offenders
427(3)
Networking among agencies to maximize services delivery
427(1)
Individualizing offender needs
428(1)
Domestic violence prevention programs
429(1)
Juveniles and Juvenile Delinquency
430(1)
Juvenile delinquents
430(1)
Status offenders
430(1)
An Overview of the Juvenile Justice System
430(13)
The origins and purposes of juvenile courts
431(3)
Parens patriae
434(1)
Arrests and other options
434(1)
Intake screenings and detention hearings
435(1)
Petitions and adjudicatory proceedings
435(1)
Transfers and waivers
436(7)
Juvenile Rights
443(3)
Landmark cases in juvenile justice
443(3)
Offense Seriousness and Dispositions
446(4)
Judicial dispositional options
446(1)
Nominal and conditional sanctions
446(1)
Custodial sanctions
447(3)
Juvenile Probation and Parole Programs
450(9)
Unconditional and conditional probation
450(2)
Intensive supervised probation (ISP) programs
452(1)
The Ohio experience
453(2)
The Allegheny Academy
455(1)
Project new pride
455(2)
Other juvenile probation and parole programs
457(2)
Revoking Juvenile Probation and Parole
459(7)
Recidivism and probation/parole revocation
462(1)
Juvenile case law on probation revocations
463(2)
Juvenile case law on parole revocations
465(1)
Questions for Review
466(1)
References 467(27)
Cases Cited 494(3)
Name Index 497(7)
Subject Index 504


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...