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Problems in Modern Latin American History: Sources and Interpretations

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780742556454

ISBN10:
074255645X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/30/2009
Publisher(s):
Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc

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Summary

Now in its third edition, this leading reader has been updated to make it even more relevant to the study of contemporary Latin America. This edition includes an entirely new chapter, _The New Left Turn,_ and the globalization chapter has been thoroughly revised to reflect the rapid pace of change over the past five years. The book continues to offer a rich variety of materials that can be tailored to the needs of individual instructors. By focusing each chapter on a single interpretive _problem,_ the book painlessly engages students in document analysis and introduces them to historiography. With its innovative combination of primary and secondary sources and editorial analysis, this text is designed specifically to stimulate critical thinking in a wide range of courses on Latin American history since independence.

Author Biography

James A. Wood is associated professor of Latin American history at North Carolina AT State University, Greensboro. John Charles Chasteen is professor of Latin American history at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Third Editionp. ix
Introductionp. xi
The Pictorial Evidence: Reading Imagesp. 1
Independence and Its Consequencesp. 3
War to the Deathp. 5
The Vision of Father MoreloscEnrique Krausep. 7
Argentina's Black Legionsp. 10
The Brazilian Path to Independencep. 15
What Independence Meant for Womenp. 18
Reading Images Nineteenth-Century Travelersp. 25
Slavery and Culturep. 29
The Beginnings of Africian -American Culturep. 31
Rethinking Palmaresp. 34
Africans in the American Worldp. 39
A Day on a Coffee Plantationp. 43
A Cuban Slave's Testimonyp. 47
Reading Images: Brazilian Slavesp. 53
Caldillosp. 57
Caidillos as Scourgep. 59
Caudillos as Profit Maximizersp. 62
Caudillos as Culture Heroesp. 67
The Lions of Payarap. 72
Ribbons and Ritualsp. 76
Protagonist on a National Stagep. 79
Liberalism and the Catholic Churchp. 83
A New Generation of Liberalsp. 85
Liberalism as Anticlericalismp. 89
The Post-Colonial Churchp. 93
The Juarez Law and the Lerdo Lawp. 97
Generational Warriorp. 100
Race and Nation Buildingp. 107
The Specter of Degenerationp. 109
Civilization versus Barbarismp. 112
A Brazilian Tenementp. 114
A Mexican National Romancep. 117
A Raceless Nationp. 122
Neocolonialismp. 129
Neocolonial Economicsp. 131
Neocolonial Ideologiesp. 134
A Paean to Progressp. 140
The Traveling Expertp. 143
Amazonian Exoticap. 145
The Athens of South Americap. 149
Our Ugly Little Backyardp. 151
Reading Images: U.S.-Latin American Relationsp. 155
Nationalismp. 161
Mestizo Pridep. 163
The Power of Indigenous Communityp. 166
The Poetry of Anti-Imperialismp. 170
Economic Nationalism in Actionp. 173
The Shark and the Sardinesp. 175
In the Eye of the Hurriance Are 120 Million Childrenp. 178
Women and Social Changep. 183
Women and Education in Latin Americap. 184
Women's Reform Issues in Late Nineteenth-Century Peru and Mexicop. 190
The Lady of Hope and the Woman of the Black Mythp. 193
Peronist Feminism in Argentinap. 199
Women's Reform Issues in Late Twentieth-Century Brazilp. 202
Populism and the Working Classp. 207
The Peronist Political Visionp. 209
Declaration of Workers' Rightsp. 214
Many Getuliosp. 216
A Consummate Speechwriterp. 221
Populism and National Developmentp. 223
Words as Weaponsp. 225
Social Revolutionp. 231
Essence of Guerrilla Warfarep. 233
Testimony of a Guatermalan Revolutionaryp. 238
Christianity and Revolutionp. 245
Chile's Revolution from Belowp. 245
The Chilean Road to Socialismp. 249
Reading Images: Religion and Politicsp. 255
Latin America, the United States, and the Cold Warp. 259
The Lesser of Two Evilsp. 261
Statements of U.S. Foreign Policy Doctrinep. 266
Alleged Assassination Plots Involving Foreign Leadersp. 269
Two Centuries Laterp. 274
Globalizationp. 281
Reagan in Cancún, or the Third Conquest of Latin Americap. 283
NAFTA and the U.S. Economyp. 287
NAFTA should Have Stopped Illegal immigration, Right?p. 289
China's New Role in Latin Americap. 292
The Buenos Aires Consensusp. 296
The New Left Turnp. 301
A Tale of Two Leftsp. 303
Latin America's Populist Revivalp. 307
Address to the United Nationsp. 310
Chávez's Oil Reformsp. 312
The Chávez-Morales Axisp. 314
On Bolivian Sovereigntyp. 318
About the Editorsp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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