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The Process of Counseling and Therapy,9780130409621
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The Process of Counseling and Therapy

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130409621

ISBN10:
0130409626
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/15/2001
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $126.40

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Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 6/15/2001.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

Taking a verypractical"how to be a psychotherapist" approach, this overview of the process of counseling provides information that isfundamentalto counseling, butnotrepresentative of any one theoretical orientation. Concise, yet thorough--and accessible to novice and seasoned professional alike--it explores counseling basics (e.g., skills, relationship building) as well as specific populations (e.g., groups, clients in crisis, couples and diverse populations).Foundation skills. The initial interview. The early phase. The middle phase. The final phase. The client in crisis. Groups and group therapy. Couple therapy. Dealing with diversity. Care and feeding of therapists.For new and seasoned professionals in counsel and psychotherapy.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
First Things First
1(12)
Therapy Then and Now
3(2)
The Therapy Depot
5(1)
Evaluating Outcomes
6(3)
Theory, Assumptions, Values
9(4)
Foundation Skills
13(24)
Listening
15(7)
Minimal Encouragers
16(1)
Paraphrasing
16(3)
Perception Checks
19(1)
Summaries
20(1)
I-Statements
21(1)
Problem Solving
22(8)
Goal Setting
22(3)
Using Questions
25(2)
Feedback
27(2)
Advice
29(1)
Dealing with Feelings
30(7)
Timing
33(1)
Therapist Feelings
34(1)
Sharing Your Feelings
35(2)
The Initial Interview
37(20)
Preparation
38(1)
Getting Started
39(4)
Centering
40(1)
Following the Client's Lead
41(1)
Being Yourself
42(1)
Gathering Information
43(5)
Diagnosis and Assessment
46(2)
Answers
48(6)
Will You Continue?
49(2)
How Will You Work Together?
51(2)
How Often, How Long, How Much?
53(1)
Ending the Session
54(3)
The Early Phase
57(18)
Rapport
58(3)
The Therapist As Teacher
61(5)
How to Talk
61(2)
A Common Vocabulary
63(1)
Skill Building
64(1)
How To Be a Client
65(1)
Contracting for Change
66(6)
What Is a Therapeutic Contract?
66(1)
Phases of the Contracting Process
67(1)
The SAFE Contract
68(2)
Building a Contract
70(1)
A Few Last Words about Contracts
71(1)
Limits
72(2)
Conclusions
74(1)
The Middle Phase
75(24)
The Relationship As a Change Agent
77(2)
Emotional Work
79(7)
Emotion and Discomfort
81(2)
Permission and Protection
83(2)
To Touch or Not to Touch
85(1)
Plunging into the Process
86(8)
Agreement and Disagreement
87(1)
Silence
88(2)
Resistance
90(3)
Getting Unstuck
93(1)
Timing
94(3)
Closing a Session
96(1)
Middle-Phase Retrospective
97(2)
The Final Phase
99(23)
Planning for Termination
100(6)
When to Terminate
102(4)
The Work of the Final Phase
106(3)
Repeating Old Themes
107(1)
Hanging On
107(2)
Feeling Reactions to Termination
109(5)
Sadness
109(1)
Anger
110(1)
Fear
111(1)
Guilt
112(1)
Pleasant Affect
113(1)
Therapist Feelings
114(2)
Unplanned Terminations
116(4)
The ``No-Show''
116(2)
The ``Abrupt Stopper''
118(2)
Therapist-Initiated Terminations
120(1)
And, to Terminate This Chapter ...
120(2)
The Client in Crisis
122(26)
Basic Principles
123(3)
First Steps with a Client in Crisis
126(11)
Gathering Information
126(1)
Resources
127(1)
Confidentiality
128(1)
The Crisis Contract
129(1)
Moving In
130(1)
Cognitive Work
131(2)
Affective Work
133(2)
Some Guidelines
135(2)
Suicide
137(9)
Recognizing the Suicidal Client
138(1)
Assessment of Suicide Danger
139(2)
The Meaning of Suicide
141(2)
What to Do
143(3)
Conclusions
146(2)
Groups and Group Therapy
148(23)
Curative Elements of the Group
148(7)
Imparting Information
149(1)
Socializing Techniques
150(1)
Instilling Hope
150(1)
Universality
151(1)
Altruism
151(1)
Cohesiveness
152(1)
Transference
153(1)
Imitation
154(1)
Catharsis
154(1)
Building and Maintaining the Group
155(5)
Initial Information
155(3)
Setting the Stage
158(2)
Therapeutic Guidelines
160(5)
Noticing Process
161(1)
Interventions
162(1)
Confrontations
163(2)
Problems
165(4)
Air Time
165(1)
Monopolizing
166(1)
Rescuers and Victims
167(1)
Disrupting and Scapegoating
168(1)
A Few Last Thoughts
169(2)
Couple Therapy
171(23)
The First Steps
172(4)
Assessment and History Taking
174(1)
Treatment Planning
175(1)
The Art of Couple Therapy
176(4)
General Guidelines
176(4)
Problem Solving
180(3)
Identifying the Problem
180(2)
Finding Antecedents
182(1)
Vulnerability
183(1)
Common Patterns
183(4)
Blaming and Complaining
184(1)
Hurting Each Other
185(1)
Double Binding
185(1)
Fusion
186(1)
Responsibility
187(1)
Some Special Situations
187(6)
Sexual Dysfunction
187(1)
Gay and Lesbian Couples
188(2)
The Extramarital Affair
190(2)
Separation Therapy
192(1)
A Final Word
193(1)
Dealing with Diversity
194(20)
Therapist Assumptions
196(1)
Client Needs
197(1)
General Guidelines
198(7)
Explaining Your Role
201(1)
Referral
202(1)
Getting Started
203(2)
Specific Cultural Groups
205(7)
African Americans
205(1)
Hispanics
206(1)
Asians
207(1)
Gay and Lesbian Clients
208(2)
The Elderly
210(1)
Religion
211(1)
In Conclusion
212(2)
Care and Feeding of Therapists
214(24)
Professionalism
215(6)
The Setting
216(2)
The Exchange
218(2)
The Attitude of a Professional
220(1)
Legal and Ethical Issues
221(10)
Responsibilities to the Client
224(2)
Confidentiality
226(4)
Extra-Therapeutic Relationships
230(1)
Therapist Self-Care
231(7)
Physical Well-Being
231(1)
Emotional Well-Being
232(2)
Special Concerns
234(2)
Growth and Development
236(2)
References 238(9)
Index 247

Excerpts

Nine years later, and time for another edition. The first question a reader/student may well ask is "why?" Is it just to make all those used copies obsolete, so as to make more money selling new ones? (That''s what I firmly believed when I was a student.) Or, do the authors get more glory--and better chance of promotion--by churning out new editions of their books? Well, dear readers, I''m glad to be able to tell you that neither of these answers is correct. The real reason for putting out a new edition is&3151;it''s needed. A lot has happened in seven years; lots of research has been done, new aspects of therapy have been discovered or rediscovered, the social climate in which therapy and counseling take place has changed enormously. I''m also glad to be able to say that the basic premises upon which this book was originally written, back in 1985, have not changed. Indeed, it has been gratifying to go back to the first edition (and the second, and the third) and find nothing significant with which I now disagree. In the main, what I believed about therapy then is what I still believe today, and those ideas still form the core of the book you now hold in your hands. Given that basic similarity, it makes sense to share with you part of the preface of the original edition. It''s about writing a book that . . . tells, as honestly as I can, how to be a psychotherapist. It also tells a lot about me, about the kinds of things that are important to me as a therapist, and the kinds of things that are difficult for me, and the kinds of things that work for me. I hope some of them will work for you too. And I also hope that some of them won''t be right for you, because every therapist needs to build a unique style, taking and rejecting bits and pieces from all sorts of teachers and models. What you decide not to use from these pages will be as important for you as what you decide to keep, for in the very process of deciding you will be shaping your own personal way of doing therapy, your own way of being in the work. There are a few things that may be helpful for you to understand before we actually get started. One has to do with pronouns--the bane of every modem American writer, forced to deal with a language that has no unisex words for her or him, he or she, hers or his. My solution has been to refer to the therapists consistently as "she" or "her" and to the client as "he" or "him." I have two reasons for this choice. First, switching back and forth between masculine and feminine pronouns, in order to balance everything out, is something that I as a reader find distracting. Second, I have frequently been surprised at my own inertial sexist bias, my own unconscious tendency to assume that the "authority" in an ambiguous situation is probably male. If 1, a professional woman, well aware of the issues of sexism in our society, still fall victim to this kind of thinking, then it seems likely that many others do too; referring to the therapist (who is usually regarded as a high-status person) as "she" helps to jolt both myself and you, the reader, into a different level of awareness. Another shortcut I have taken the liberty of using is to omit the words counselorand counselingfrom most of the book, in favor of therapist, therapy,or psychotherapy.Using both ("Counselors and psychotherapists . . ."; "in the counseling or therapy session. . . ") is cumbersome and unwieldy; switching back and forth seems confusing. While a very good case can be made for differences between counseling and psychotherapy, the exact nature of the differences depends on who happens to be arguing about it. Moreover, it is increasingly true that many psychotherapists do a lot of counseling, and that many counselors do a lot of therapy, and that the dividing line between the two is pretty blurred. This is a book about what I would call "therapy"; it''s also a book about what occupies much of the professional life of competent counselors. What I didn''twrite in that first preface, perhaps because I wasn''t as certain about it as I am now, seventeen years later, is that this thing we call either psychotherapy or counseling or both--when it is done properly--is, first and foremost, a matter of relationship. It is the relationship between client and therapist that makes therapy work. The real process of therapy, the real excitement, happens in a kind of in-between that is forged through the therapeutic interaction. It grows out of mutual respect, out of the client''s genuine desire to change and grow and out of the therapist''s regard for the client''s own wisdom. Certainly, the skill of the therapist is another major ingredient. But without a solid therapeutic relationship, skill can do little to help a client. So, as you read about active listening and diagnosis and contract-building and all of the other technical things that therapists do, remember that they all depend on something else, something elusive and hard to put into words: an authentic relationship between two individuals who are willing to be real with each other. Authenticity, being real, is at the heart of the kind of therapy that this book attempts to describe. Because my professional life has taken a number of twists and turns over the last few years (my academic title now has the word "Emerita" tacked onto the end of it), I decided not to tackle a new edition of The Process of Counseling and Therapyon my own. The good folks at Prentice Hall were kind enough to find another professor/author/therapist interested in working with me, and this book is the product of our joint efforts. -- Jan Moursund Although this book has been around for some time, it is this fourth edition that I lend my name to. Simply put: the book needed revisions, and Jan needed help! Over the last year, we have worked together, Jan in Oregon and I in Florida. Thank goodness for e-mail and overnight packages; they have kept this bicoastal project alive. The writing has been an incredible experience for me. It has helped me to define what it is that I do in therapy and to understand why it is so important. I found that I agreed with most of what Jan had to say, which helped make our writing together easier and also validated me as a clinician. I have used this text in my classrooms for years, so I was familiar with its strengths and its weaknesses. When I began to work on the new edition, I used both comments from reviewers and my own ideas. Many of the references in the book have been updated to include the most current work in the field of counseling, but we have not forgotten those "legends" whose words are always timeless. The most obvious addition is the inclusion of a new chapter, "Dealing with Diversity." Given the changing demographics of the United States, it seemed compelling to include such a chapter. Certainly, from my perspective in south Florida, a multicultural society is a reality and not just a scholarly notion. In this new chapter we have tried to provide a sense of how generally to work with individuals who differ from oneself, whether it be in terms of age, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. My thanks go to those who have helped me on my journey to write this book:. my colleague Adriana McEachern, who lent me many sources of information and is a great sounding board; my assistant Salima Patel, who spent endless hours working on the computer and who has suffered through editing each chapter and reference; my "legal mind" in Jim Koenig, handy with legal advice and know-how; my dearest friend Joanna Pera, whose enthusiasm is unsurpassed--she must have been a cheerleader in another life; my partner in practice Irene Marshal--thanks for your support both in practice and friendship


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