9780134552750

The Professional Server A Training Manual

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780134552750

  • ISBN10:

    013455275X

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2017-02-09
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental and eBook copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Complete coverage of all aspects of dining room service, with real-life examples and updated information on technology in the industry.

In The Professional Server, students get an introduction to the many aspects of being a professional server, and experienced servers get an excellent reference to consult for various techniques and service situations they face in their day-to-day work. This popular resource features easy-to-read, self-contained chapters, which flow in a logical sequence and allow flexibility in teaching and learning. Coverage includes areas such as professional appearance, guest communication, table settings, food, wine, and beverage service, and current technologies. Restaurant Reality stories and step-by-step photographs give students an insider’s look into what makes an effective server.

Author Biography

Edward Sanders is an adjunct professor of Hospitality Management at New York City College of Technology. He is a Certified Food Executive and Certified Purchasing Manager and has a Master of Science degree in International Management from Thunderbird School of Global Management and a Doctor of Business Administration degree in Management and Organization. Through his career in business and education he has been associated with Xerox, Sky Chefs-American Airlines, Marriott, Delaware North, Brigham Young University, Oregon State University, and Southern Oregon University. Ed owned a restaurant, operated a chain of restaurants, founded and operated Hospitality News (1988—2006), has been an associate professor of business, and cofounded and directed a hospitality and tourism management university program. He is also the author of Food, Labor, and Beverage Cost Control (2016, Waveland Press)and the lead coauthor of Catering Solutions for the Culinary Student, Foodservice Operator, and Caterer (2000, Prentice-Hall).

 

Marcella Giannasio is an Associate Professor at Johnson & Wales University, Charlotte, North Carolina, and teaches in the culinary department. She has also taught and supervised students in Koblenz, Germany, at the Deutsche Wein und Sommelierschule, and At-Sunrice Global Chef Academy in Singapore, and participated in the Banfi scholastic tour in Italy. Marcella is a graduate of the College of Charleston and earned a master’s degree in management from Southern Wesleyan University. Her certifications include: Certified Hospitality Educator through the American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute, Foodservice Management Professional through the National Restaurant Association, and a Court of Master Sommelier Level1. She is a Bordeaux wine ambassador and holds an advanced wine & spirits certification from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust Limited based in London, and is a Hospitality Grand Master through the Federation of Dining Room Professionals. She joined the Johnson & Wales University faculty in 1997 with having many years of management experience within the hospitality industry.

Table of Contents

1

The Professional Server 

The Economic Importance of the Restaurant Industry 

Advancement Opportunities 

Income Opportunities 

Tipping Standard 

Getting Stiffed (Left With No Tip) 

Tip Credit 

Non-Tipping Restaurants 

Occupational Advantages for Professional Servers 

Occupational Disadvantages for Professional Servers 

Challenges for the Restaurant Industry 

Job Qualifications 

Restaurant Reality 

Never judge a book by its cover

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

2

Professional Appearance 

Server Health 

Grooming Standards 

Grooming Guidelines 

Body Language, Poise, and Posture 

Uniforms and Aprons 

Shoes 

Restaurant Reality 

When how you look and perform your duties is noticed

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

3

Table Service, Table Settings, and Napkin Presentations 

Table Service 

American Service (Individual Plate Service) 

Butler Service 

English Service 

Modified English Service  

Russian Service 

French Service 

Other Types of Service 

Family Service  

Counter Service 

Banquet Service 

Room Service 

Salad Bars 

Dessert Tables and Trays 

Setting a Table 

Bread and Butter 

Side Dishes and Condiments   

Flatware Placement 

Glassware   

Cup and Saucer   

Table Settings    

Breakfast Table Setting

Lunch Table Setting 

Dinner Table Setting 

Formal Dinner Table Setting   

Napkin Presentations 

Restaurant Reality   

What is happening with tabletop place settings?

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

4

Service Readiness 

Responsibilities that Support Good Service 

Opening and Closing Side-Work 

Closing Procedures 

The Dining Room

The Menu 

Breakfast Menu 

Lunch Menu 

Dinner Menu 

Dessert Menu

Tablet Menus

Wine List 

The Guest and the Menu 

The Server and the Menu 

Restaurant Reality

Work Smart or Work Hard?

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

5

Serving Food and Beverages 

Proper Table Service

Service Etiquette

Removing Dishes and Flatware

Booth Service

The Bartender / Server

Loading and Carrying a Tray 

Carrying Glasses 

Service Priorities and Timing 

Server’s Assistant (or Busser) Responsibilities

Table Bussing

Customer Complaints and Issues

Restaurant Reality 

Complaints are not always reasonable but always have a solution

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

6

Beverages and Beverage Service 

Responsible Alcohol Service 

   Incident Report

Wine and Wine Service 

Proper Temperatures for Serving Wines 

Ice Bucket Usage 

Wine Presentation and Service 

Opening Champagne or Sparkling Wine 

Decanting Wine 

Wine Glasses 

Styles of Wine  

Grape Varietals

Notable Wine Varietals and Food Pairings 

Food and Wine Pairing

Distilled Spirits and Cocktails 

Beers, Lagers, and Ales 

Bottled Waters 

Coffee 

   Types of Roasts

Baristas and Barista Training 

Types of Coffee Drinks 

Spirited Coffee Drinks

Tea 

Restaurant Reality

A feeling of being welcome at home with hospitality and specialized drinks

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

7

Guest Communication 

Getting to Know Your Guests 

Taking the Guest’s Order  

Server Enthusiasm 

Different Types of Guests 

Guests with Special Needs 

Anticipating the Guest’s Needs 

Nonverbal Cues and Prompts 

Suggestive Selling 

Guidelines for Suggestive Selling

Servers Incentives 

Showmanship sells suggestively 

Service Timing 

Emergency Situations 

Connecting to the Guest to Create Guest Loyalty

Restaurant Reality

A welcoming greeting and personalized service creates loyal guests

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

8

The Technology of Service 

Benefits of Technology 

Technology Applications 

Handheld Touch-Screen Tablet 

Product Management Applications 

Tabletop Tablets 

Kitchen Production Screen 

Handheld Pay-At-The-Table Devices 

Alert Manager Application 

CRM (Customer Relationship Management) Application 

Employee Scheduling and Communication 

Training with Technology 

Online Table Reservation Applications  

Table Management Applications  

Web Presence  

Restaurant Reality  

We only have 30 minutes for lunch

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

9

Dining Room Management 

Responsibilities of the Maître d’ or Host 

Menu Meetings 

Managing Reservations 

Taking Telephone Reservations and “Take-Out” Orders 

Greeting Guests 

Table Selection 

Professional Courtesies  

Responding to Complaints 

Server Training 

Restaurant Reality

How to recover from disappointing circumstances

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

 

10

Banquet, Catering, and Buffet Management 

The Event Plan 

Event Management

Customer Information

Date and Time Schedule

Number of Guests

Service Presentation 

Menu

Bar Service

Open Bar

Cash Bar

Open Bar — Cash Bar Combination

Room Location 

Room Floor Plan

Table Setup 

Table Sizes 

Length/Width/Seating 

Table Arrangements 

Head Table 

Table Numbers

Accessories 

Estimated Charges

Service Fee

Deposit Amounts and Payments

Restaurant Reality

The helpful service and details from a banquet/catering manager

Summary 

Discussion Questions and Exercises 

Glossary Common Menu Terms 

Glossary Wine, Beer, Spirits, and Beverage Terms

Rewards Program

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