9780262024457

A Prosodic Model of Sign Language Phonology

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780262024457

  • ISBN10:

    0262024454

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1999-03-05
  • Publisher: Bradford Books
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Summary

This book is intended in part to provide linguists and cognitive scientists who do not know sign language with a point of entry into the study of sign language phonology. At the same time, it presents a comprehensive theory of American Sign Language (ASL) phonology, while reviewing and building on alternative theories. One claim of this theoretical framework is that, because of sign language's visual/gestural phonetic basis, the consonant-like units and vowel-like units are expressed simultaneously with one another, rather than sequentially as in spoken languages. A second claim is that movements operate as the most basic prosodic units of the language. The author is concerned to show both the similarities and differences between signed and spoken languages, and to indicate some directions for future work in cognitive science that can be derived from her phonological model.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii(4)
Notational Conventions and Abbreviations xvii
Chapter 1 Goals of the Model
1(52)
1.1 General Introduction
1(2)
1.2 Introduction to Sign Structures
3(19)
1.3 Overview of the Prosodic Model
22(31)
Chapter 2 The Use of Constraint-Based Frameworks and Prosodic Units in Analyses of Sign Languages
53(40)
2.1 General Assumptions
53(2)
2.2 How Constraint-Based Models Operate
55(8)
2.3 Feature Geometry and Dependency Phonology
63(6)
2.4 The Phonetics-Phonology Interface and Enhancement Theory
69(1)
2.5 Markedness
69(1)
2.6 The Syllable and the Prosodic Word
70(11)
2.7 The Relationship between Native and Nonnative Components of the ASL Lexicon
81(2)
2.8 The Prosodic Model in the Context of Other Models of Sign Language Phonology
83(10)
Chapter 3 Inherent Features
93(36)
3.1 A Feature Geometry for ASL
93(3)
3.2 The Traditional ASL Parameters and Their Relationship to Class Nodes
96(1)
3.3 The Structure of the Inherent Features: Articulator and Place
97(20)
3.4 Handshape Inventories, Redundancy, and Markedness
117(2)
3.5 Place of Articulation
119(4)
3.6 The Orientation Relation
123(3)
3.7 Nonterminal Features
126(1)
3.8 Conclusion
126(3)
Chapter 4 Prosodic Features
129(48)
4.1 Introduction to Movement Types
129(4)
4.2 Movement Migration: Proximalization and Distalization
133(3)
4.3 Path Features
136(15)
4.4 Setting Changes
151(4)
4.5 Orientation Changes
155(3)
4.6 Handshape Changes
158(6)
4.7 An Articulator-Free Feature: [Trilled Movement]
164(9)
4.8 Nonmanual Prosodic Features
173(1)
4.9 Conclusion
174(3)
Chapter 5 Timing Units
177(36)
5.1 Definition of Timing Units in the Prosodic Model
177(3)
5.2 Three Segment Slots or Two?
180(6)
5.3 Two-Movement Stems
186(7)
5.4 Phonological Operations Involving Timing Units: Phrase-Final Lengthening
193(3)
5.5 A Morphophonemic Operation Using Timing Units: A Linearly Ordered Affix in ASL--[Delayed Completive]
196(9)
5.6 Sequential Movements Are Syllables
205(6)
5.7 Conclusion
211(2)
Chapter 6 Complexity, Sonority, and Weight in ASL Syllables
213(34)
6.1 Complexity in Inherent and Prosodic Branches of Structure
213(3)
6.2 Prosodic Complexity as Visual Sonority
216(8)
6.3 Grammatical Uses of Visual Sonority in Syllables
224(13)
6.4 Subsyllabic Units of Prosodic Analysis
237(7)
6.5 Weight Units and Their Interaction with Syntactic Constituents
244(1)
6.6 Conclusion
245(2)
Chapter 7 The Structure of Two-Handed Signs
247(38)
7.1 The Importance of Two-Handed Signs in a General Description of Sign Language Phonology
247(4)
7.2 Alternative Accounts of H(2)
251(5)
7.3 Arguments Supporting a Single Structure for Two-Handed Signs
256(4)
7.4 The Prosodic Model's Structure for H(2)
260(5)
7.5 An Optimality-Theoretic Account of Weak Drop
265(12)
7.6 Alternative Accounts of H(2) Revisited
277(2)
7.7 H(2) as a Prosodic Unit
279(3)
7.8 Conclusion and Residual Issues
282(3)
Chapter 8 Contributions of Sign Language Phonology to Phonological Theory and Cognitive Science
285(30)
8.1 The Prosodic Model Revisited
285(7)
8.2 Constraints, Inventories, and the Lexicon
292(11)
8.3 Units of Phonological Analysis
303(3)
8.4 Similarities between the Architecture of the Visual System and the Prosodic Model
306(7)
8.5 Conclusion
313(2)
Appendix A The Letters of the ASL Manual Alphabet Labeled [Flexed] or Nonflexed 315(2)
Appendix B Verb Forms That Do and Do Not Allow the [Delayed Completive] Aspect 317(2)
Appendix C Forms That Undergo Reduplicative Nominalization 319(2)
Appendix D Descriptive Categories of Two-Handed Signs According to Their Ability to Undergo Weak Drop 321(4)
Notes 325(10)
References 335(18)
Index of Illustrated Signs 353(2)
General Index 355

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