9780805840964

Psychology and Environmental Change

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780805840964

  • ISBN10:

    0805840966

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-08-01
  • Publisher: Lawrence Erlbau

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

This book stimulates thinking on the topic of detrimental environmental change and how research psychologists can help to address the problem. In addition to reporting environmentally relevant psychological research, the author identifies the most pressing questions from an environmental point of view. Psychology and Environmental Change: *focuses on ways in which human behavior contributes to the problem; *deals with the assessment and change of attitudes and with studies of change of behavior; *proposes ways in which psychological research can contribute to making technology and its products more environmentally benign; and *introduces topics such as consumption, risk assessment, cost-benefit and tradeoff analyses, competition, negotiation, and policymaking, and how they relate to the objective of protecting the environment.

Author Biography

Dr. Raymond S. Nickerson is a Research Professor at Tufts University in Massachusetts

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Introduction
1(11)
Environmental Psychology
1(5)
Behavior as a Cause of Environmental Change
6(3)
Challenges for Applied Psychology
9(1)
Plan of the Book
10(2)
The Problem
12(35)
Global Warming
13(9)
Acid Rain
22(2)
Air Pollution and Urban Smog
24(3)
Stratospheric Ozone Depletion
27(2)
Water Contamination and Depletion
29(2)
Deforestation
31(1)
Desertification
32(2)
Wetland Loss
34(1)
Decreasing Biodiversity
35(3)
Waste
38(1)
Toxic and Radioactive Waste
39(2)
Contamination from Industrial Accidents
41(1)
Natural Disasters
42(1)
Interdependence of Aspects
43(1)
Urgency of the Problem
44(3)
Behavior as a Cause of Environmental Change
47(25)
Inefficient Use of Energy
49(2)
Over Reliance on Fossil Fuels
51(1)
Over Reliance on Inefficient Transportation
52(1)
Inefficient Use of Water
52(1)
Burning of Tropical Forests
53(1)
Practice of Nonsustainable Agriculture
54(1)
Nonsustainable Harvesting of Forests and Forest Products
55(1)
Overutilization of Other Natural Resources
56(1)
Destruction of Habitat
57(1)
Use of Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)
57(1)
Unnecessary Release of Toxic Materials
58(1)
Business Decisions
58(1)
Unnecessary Waste Generation
59(1)
Improper Waste Disposal
59(2)
Excessive Consumption
61(2)
Failure to Consider Long-Term and Indirect Costs and Benefits
63(1)
Failure to Maintain and Repair
64(1)
Failure to Recycle
64(1)
Failure to Design for Maintainability, Repairability, Recyclability and Disposability
65(1)
Failure to Limit Population Growth
66(6)
Attitude Assessment and Change
72(19)
Attitude Assessment
73(3)
Measuring the Perceived Value of Environmental Resources
76(2)
Assessing Environmental Quality
78(3)
Attitudes Toward Animals
81(3)
Beliefs and Attitudes as Determinants of Behavior
84(4)
Effecting Changes in Attitudes
88(3)
Changing Behavior
91(27)
Increasing Energy-Conserving Behavior
93(3)
Conserving Energy in Transportation
96(2)
Increasing Recycling
98(2)
Reducing Waste Production
100(1)
Antilittering Campaigns
101(1)
Education and Persuasion in Behavior Change
102(4)
Importance of Choice and Sense of Control
106(1)
Importance of Commitment
106(2)
Importance of Information Feedback
108(3)
Peer Pressure and Social Norms
111(1)
Change Versus Effective Lasting Change
112(2)
Remaining Questions Regarding Human Behavior and Environmental Change
114(1)
What Motivates Environmentally Beneficial Behavior?
115(3)
Technology Enhancement
118(19)
Increasing the Efficiency of Energy Use
120(3)
Developing Cleaner Means of Energy Production
123(3)
Increasing the Efficiency of Water Use
126(1)
Improving Mass Transportation Facilities
127(2)
Improving the Technology of Recycling
129(1)
Radioactive Waste Treatment and Cleanup Technologies
130(1)
Accident Prevention and Amelioration
131(1)
Human Factors of Farming and Food Production
132(1)
Approaches to the Harvesting of Renewable Forest Products
133(1)
Rethinking the Nature and Purposes of Work
134(1)
Developing Marketable Environmentally Clean Technology
135(1)
Promoting the Idea of Industrial Ecosystems
136(1)
Substituting Resource-Light for Resource-Heavy Technologies
137(11)
Information Technology
138(2)
Electronic Documents
140(4)
Teleconferencing
144(1)
Telecommuting
145(1)
Development of Virtual-Reality Technology
146(2)
Artifact Design and Evaluation
148(11)
Designing for Longevity, Recyclability and Disposability
148(1)
Product Evaluation from an Environmental Perspective
149(2)
Database Design and Information Access
151(2)
Model Development and Evaluation
153(3)
Tools for Interdisciplinary and International Collaboration and Cooperation
156(3)
Consumption, Consumerism, and Environmental Economics
159(13)
Consumer Behavior
159(3)
Fashion, Style, and Resource Utilization
162(1)
Advertising
162(1)
Alternative Ways of Satisfying Needs and Desires
163(1)
Consumer Education Generally
164(2)
The Media and Public Opinion
166(2)
Environmental Protection and Economic Development
168(4)
Risk and the Psychology of Prevention
172(13)
Risk Assessment
172(2)
Problems in Quantifying Risk
174(1)
Expert Versus Lay Perceptions of Risk
174(3)
Limitations of Expert Opinion
177(1)
Fallibility of Predictive Behavior
178(1)
Communication of Risk
179(1)
Human Response to Risk
180(4)
The Psychology of Prevention
184(1)
Cost-Benefit and Tradeoff Analyses
185(18)
Cost-Benefit Analyses
185(1)
The Difficulty of Quantifying Costs
186(3)
The Difficulty of Quantifying Benefits
189(3)
The Controversial Nature of Cost-Benefit Analysis
192(2)
Ethics Versus Economics in Cost-Benefit Analysis
194(3)
Tradeoff Analyses
197(6)
Competition, Cooperation, Negotiation and Policymaking
203(12)
The Nature of Social Dilemmas
203(2)
Dealing With Social Dilemmas
205(3)
Social Dilemma Research
208(1)
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
209(2)
Policy Formulation and Decision Making
211(4)
Concluding Comments
215(8)
References 223(66)
Author Index 289(24)
Subject Index 313

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