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The Psychology of Religion, Second Edition An Empirical Approach,9781572301160
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The Psychology of Religion, Second Edition An Empirical Approach

by ; ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9781572301160

ISBN10:
1572301163
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/2/1996
Publisher(s):
The Guilford Press
List Price: $69.33
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Summary

Presenting a comprehensive survey of the empirical literature available today, this volume emphasizes scientific work that is moving the psychology of religion into the mainstream of academic psychology. Structured as a text, the book's chapters each integrate findings according to the theory or theories that best illuminate them.

Author Biography

Ralph W. Hood Jr., Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. A past president of the Psychology of Religion division of the American Psychological Association and a recipient of its William James Award, he is a former editor of the International Journal of the Psychology of Religion and the current editor of The Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Bernard Spilka, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at the University of Denver, is past president of the Psychology of Religion division of the American Psychological Association and a recipient of its William James Award. He formerly served as vice-president of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion and president of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association and the Colorado Psychological Association. Bruce Hunsberger, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Widely published, he is a recipient of the William James award for research of the Psychology of Religion division of the American Psychological Association. Richard Gorsuch, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Psychology of Fuller Theological Seminary, is a past president of the Psychology of Religion division of the American Psychological Association, a recipient of its William James Award, and a former editor of The Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.

Table of Contents

The Psychological Nature and Functions of Religion
1(43)
Why the Psychological of Religion?
1(1)
Basic Questions and Directions
2(2)
Defining Religion: Is It Possible?
4(4)
Being Religious: One Thing or Many?
8(4)
Why Are People Religious?
12(11)
An Integrating Framework for the Psychological of Religion
23(3)
Attributional Approaches to the Psychology of Religion
26(11)
Overview
37(1)
Appendix: Statistical Procedures and Considerations
38(6)
Religion in Childhood
44(28)
Is Religion in Our Genes?
44(2)
Theories of Religious Development
46(9)
Related Empirical Research
55(7)
A Different Approach: Attachment Theory
62(1)
Is a Unified Approach Possible?
63(1)
What's Missing?
64(3)
Overview
67(5)
Religious Socialization and Thought in Adolescence and Young Adulthood
72(39)
Religious Socialization
72(2)
Influences on Religiousness in Childhood and Adolescence
74(13)
How Religious Are Adolescents and Young Adults?
87(2)
Religious Thinking and Reasoning in Adolescence and Young Adulthood
89(4)
Religious Doubts
93(3)
Apostasy
96(8)
Overview
104(7)
Religion in Adult Life
111(42)
Religious Belief and Behavior among Adults
112(6)
Religion in Work, Professionals, and Occupations
118(7)
Religion in Social Relationships
125(2)
Religion in Love and Marriage
127(13)
Religion in Other Areas of Adult Life: Politics as an Example
140(5)
Overview
145(8)
Religion and Death
153(30)
Religion, Death, and Immortality
154(6)
Religion, Death, Anxiety, and Death Perspectives
160(4)
Religion, Death, and the Elderly
164(2)
Religion and Euthanasia
166(2)
Religion and Bereavement
168(3)
Religion and Suicide
171(1)
A Special Case: Religion, Death, Anxiety, and AIDS
172(1)
Death and the Clergy
173(3)
Death in the Religious-Social Context
176(3)
Overview
179(4)
Religious Experience
183(41)
Conceptual Considerations in Defining Religious Experience
184(7)
The Body in Religious Experience
191(11)
Religious Imagery: The Return of the Ostracized
202(12)
Psychedelic Drugs and Religious Experience
214(6)
Overview
220(4)
Mysticism
224(49)
Conceptual Issues in the Study of Mysticism
225(3)
Representative Classic Views of Mysticism
228(4)
The Empirical Study of Mysticism
232(33)
Overview
265(8)
Conversion
273(27)
The Classic Research Paradigm: Psychological Dominance
275(7)
The Contemporary Research Paradigm: Sociological Dominance
282(4)
Conversion Processes
286(4)
Deconversion and Related Phenomena
290(5)
Overview
295(5)
The Social Psychology of Religious Organizations
300(38)
The Classification of Religious Organizations
301(1)
Church-Sect Theory
301(7)
Organizational Dynamics
308(7)
Cults
315(6)
The Anti-Cult Movement
321(9)
Social-Psychological Processes in Religious Participation
330(2)
Overview
332(6)
Religion and Morality
338(39)
Does Religion Dictate Morality?
338(2)
Moral Attitudes
340(1)
Moral Behavior
340(31)
Overview
371(6)
Religion, Coping, and Adjustment
377(29)
Theoretical Approaches to Coping and Religion
377(6)
Religion and General Adjustment
383(2)
Religion and Coping with Stress
385(7)
Religion and Health
392(1)
How Religion Works in Coping
393(8)
Overview
401(5)
Religion and Mental Disorder
406(37)
Past and Present: Confusion in Values and Practices
406(2)
Directions, Concerns, and Cautions
408(2)
Religion as an Expression of Mental Disorder
410(5)
Religion as a Socializing and Suppressing Agent
415(4)
Religion as a Heaven
419(4)
Religion as Therapy
423(3)
Religion as a Hazard to Mental Health
426(2)
Topics of Special Concern
428(5)
Religion, Personality, and Mental Disorder: Issues and Concerns
433(3)
Religion and Psychotherapy
436(1)
Overview
436(7)
Epilogue
443(12)
Research in the Psychology of Religion
443(3)
The Need for Theory in the Psychology of Religion
446(9)
References 455(67)
Index 522


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