9780804002547

Public and Its Problems

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780804002547

  • ISBN10:

    0804002541

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 7/1/2006
  • Publisher: OHIO UNIVERSITY PRESS

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
  • We Buy This Book Back!
    In-Store Credit: $2.63
    Check/Direct Deposit: $2.50

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The Used and Rental copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

In The Public and Its Problems, a classic of social and political philosophy, John Dewey exhibits his strong faith in the potential of human intelligence to solve the public's problems. In his characteristic provocative style, Dewey clarifies the meaning and implications of such concepts as "the public," "the state," "government," and "political democracy." He distinguishes his a posterior reasoning from a priori reasoning, which, he argues permeates less meaningful discussion of basic concepts. Dewey repeatedly demonstrates the interrelationships between fact and theory.

Table of Contents

Foreword (written in 1927) i
Afterword (written in 1946) 221
Search for the Public
3(34)
Divergence of facts and theoretical interpretations concerning the nature of the state
3(2)
Practical import of theories
5(4)
Theories in terms of causal origin
9(3)
Theory in terms of perceived consequences
12(1)
Distinction of private and public substituted for that of individual and social
13(9)
The influence of association
22(4)
Plurality of associations
26(1)
Criterion of the public
27(1)
Function of the state
28(4)
The state as an experimental problem
32(2)
Summary
34(3)
Discovery of the State
37(38)
Public and state
38(1)
Geographical extent
39(4)
Multiplicity of states
43(4)
Spread of consequences
47(6)
Law is not command
53(2)
Law and reasonableness
55(2)
The public and long-established habits of action
57(2)
Fear of the new
59(3)
Irreparable consequences
62(3)
Variation of state-functions according to circumstances of time and place
65(1)
State and government
66(3)
State and society
69(4)
The pluralistic theory
73(2)
The Democratic State
75(35)
Private and representative roles of officials
76(2)
Selection of rulers by irrelevant methods
78(4)
The problem of control of officials
82(1)
Meanings of democracy
83(1)
Fallacy as to origin of democratic government
84(1)
Influence of non-political factors
85(1)
The origin of ``individualism,''
86(4)
Influence of the new industry; the theory of ``natural'' economic laws
90(3)
James Mill's philosophy of democratic government
93(2)
Criticism of ``individualism,''
95(7)
Criticism of antithesis of natural and artificial
102(2)
Wants and aims as functions of social life
104(4)
Persistence of pre-industrial institutions
108(1)
Final problem
109(1)
Eclipse of the Public
110(33)
Local origin of American democratic government
111(3)
National unification due to technological factors
114(2)
Submergence of the public
116(1)
Disparity of inherited ideas and machinery with actual conditions
117(2)
Illustrations of resulting failures
119(3)
Problem of discovering the public
122(1)
Democracy versus the expert
123(3)
Explanation of eclipse of public
126(1)
Illustrated by the World War
127(2)
Application of criteria of the public
129(2)
Failure of traditional principles
131(3)
Political apathy accounted for
134(1)
Need of experts
135(3)
Rivals of political interest
138(3)
Ideals and instrumentalities
141(2)
Search for the Great Community
143(42)
Democracy as idea and as governmental behavior
143(4)
Problem of the Great Community
147(1)
Meaning of the democratic ideal
148(1)
Democracy and community life
149(2)
Community and associated activity
151(1)
Communication and the community
152(3)
Intellectual conditions of the Great Community
155(3)
Habit and intelligence
158(5)
Science and knowledge
163(3)
Limitations upon social inquiry
166(5)
Isolation of social inquiry
171(1)
Pure and applied science
172(1)
Communication and public opinion
173(3)
Limitations of distribution of knowledge
176(7)
Communication as art
183(2)
The Problem of Method
185(48)
Antithesis between individual and social as obstruction to method
186
Meaning of individual
185(6)
Where opposition lies
191(3)
Meaning of absolutistic logic
194(2)
Illustration from doctrine of ``evolution,''
196(1)
From psychology
197(2)
Difference of human and physical science
199(3)
Experimental inquiry as alternative
202(1)
Method, and government by experts
203(3)
Democracy and education by discussion
206(4)
The level of intelligence
210(1)
The necessity of local community life
211(2)
Problem of restoration
213(2)
Tendencies making for reestablishment
215(2)
Connection of this problem with the problem of political intelligence
217(16)
Index 233

Rewards Program

Write a Review