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Public Relations A Values-Driven Approach, Cases Edition

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780205495382

ISBN10:
0205495389
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/8/2006
Publisher(s):
Pearson

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Summary

Public Relations: A Values-Driven Approach, Cases Edition, adds 24 timely and exciting cases to the authorsrs" successful introductory text, engaging students in the practice of public relations. In a time when society is holding individuals and organizations to high standards of conduct, this text teaches students how to build ethical, productive relationships with strategic constituencies. Steeped in the traditions and theories of public relations, the book features an engaging, informal tone. It abounds with lively anecdotes and is offered at a reasonable price for students. Maintaining the intriguing and effective features of the original text, the Cases Edition includes an entire section of supplemental case studies with discussion questions to convey the excitement and challenges of real-world public relations. Mixing positive examples with public relations gone awry, the authors have developed eight brand-new case studies and updated cases from previous editions of Public Relations: A Values-Driven Approach proven to help students gain an understanding of the industry. Features of the Text Emphasizes values and ethics in public relations to raise students' consciousness of contemporary issues in the field. Includes several case studies in each chapter to illustrate key concepts as well as the supplemental case studies in this special edition. Features "Quick" boxes that offer review questions and expand on important topics. Incorporates a number of additional pedagogical features, making the book a valuable learning tool for students: "Memo from the Field" at the conclusion of each chapter connects students to diverse real-world public relations practitioners. A "Values Statement," found in every chapter and representing successful, respected organizations, illustrates the real-world application of a values-driven approach. Chapter objectives, discussion questions, key terms, and a glossary help students learn and study chapter concepts.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
About the Authors xix
section one Foundations of Public Relations
What Is Public Relations?
1(31)
Public Relations: Everywhere You Look
2(6)
The Search for a Definition
4(1)
Public Relations Defined
5(1)
QuickBreak 1.1 The Definition Debate
6(2)
A Profession Gaining in Respect
8(3)
The Hunt-Grunig Models of Public Relations
8(2)
Public Relations and Marketing
10(1)
Why a Public Relations Career?
11(3)
A Profile of Practitioners
11(1)
QuickBreak 1.2 A Profession or a Trade?
12(1)
Values Statement 1.1 J.C. Penney Company
13(1)
The Public Relations Process
14(1)
The Traditional Four-Step Model of the Public Relations Process
14(1)
The Dynamic Model of the Public Relations Process
15(1)
The Role of Values in Public Relations
15(2)
Actions Speak Louder Than Words---Part I
17(1)
Values-Driven Public Relations
17(4)
Actions Speak Louder Than Words---Part II
18(1)
Whose Values Should You Follow?
19(1)
QuickBreak 1.3 How Organizations Establish Their Values
20(1)
Summary
21(1)
Discussion Questions
22(6)
Memo from the Field Judith T. Phair, Phairadvantage Communications
22(2)
Case Study 1.1 Closing the Gap on Sweatshops
24(2)
Case Study 1.2 The Harsh Lessons of History
26(2)
Key Terms
28(1)
Notes
29(3)
Jobs in Public Relations
32(25)
Where the Jobs Are
33(10)
Corporations
33(4)
Nonprofit Organizations and Trade Associations
37(1)
Values Statement 2.1 Public Relations Society of America
38(1)
QuickBreak 2.1 The Values of Successful Employers
39(1)
Governments
39(1)
Public Relations Agencies
40(1)
Independent Public Relations Consultants
41(1)
QuickBreak 2.2 Getting That First Job or Internship
42(1)
Public Relations Activities and Duties
43(3)
QuickBreak 2.3 Student Misperceptions of Public Relations
45(1)
Working Conditions and Salaries
46(2)
QuickBreak 2.4 The People in Public Relations
47(1)
What's Important in a Job?
48(1)
Summary
48(1)
Discussion Questions
49(6)
Memo from the Field John Echeveste, Valencia, Perez & Echeveste Public Relations
49(2)
Case Study 2.1 Good Guys Finish First: John Graham and the Gold Anvil
51(2)
Case Study 2.2 A List to Avoid
53(2)
Key Terms
55(1)
Notes
55(2)
A Brief History of Public Relations
57(35)
Why History Is Important to You
58(1)
Premodern Public Relations
58(7)
Trends Leading to the Development of Modern Public Relations
59(3)
QuickBreak 3.1 Blowing Smoke
62(1)
Pre-20th-Century America
62(1)
Values Statement 3.1 The United States Constitution
63(1)
QuickBreak 3.2 The American Revolution
64(1)
The Seedbed Years
65(4)
Theodore Roosevelt (1858--1919)
66(1)
Ivy Ledbetter Lee (1877--1934)
67(2)
War and Propaganda
69(6)
Edward L. Bernays (1891--1995)
70(1)
QuickBreak 3.3 The Scopes Monkey Trial
71(3)
QuickBreak 3.4 The Mother of Public Relations
74(1)
Why Bernays and Not Lee?
75(1)
The Postwar Boom
75(3)
Postwar Social Activism
76(1)
QuickBreak 3.5 Other Notable Figures from Public Relations' Past
77(1)
The Downsizing of the United States
78(1)
The Baby Boomers Come of Age
79(1)
The New Millennium
79(1)
Summary
80(1)
Discussion Questions
81(7)
Memo from the Field Edward M. Block
81(2)
Case Study 3.1 Remembering the Victims
83(3)
Case Study 3.2 Too Much Blood and Money
86(2)
Key Terms
88(1)
Notes
88(4)
The Publics in Public Relations
92(45)
What Is a Public?
93(2)
Why Do We Need Relationships with Publics?
94(1)
The Publics in Public Relations
95(5)
Traditional and Nontraditional Publics
96(1)
Latent, Aware, and Active Publics
97(1)
Intervening Publics
98(1)
QuickBreak 4.1 Your Tax Dollars at Work
99(1)
Primary and Secondary Publics
99(1)
Internal and External Publics
100(1)
Domestic and International Publics
100(1)
What Do We Need to Know about Each Public?
100(4)
Coorientation
103(1)
The Traditional Publics in Public Relations
104(20)
Employees
104(3)
QuickBreak 4.2 Sabotage in the Workplace
107(1)
The News Media
108(3)
Values Statement 4.1 Pepsico
111(1)
Governments
111(2)
QuickBreak 4.3 James Bond Saves the Whales?
113(1)
Investors
114(2)
Consumers/Customers
116(2)
Multicultural Communities
118(2)
QuickBreak 4.4 The Customer Is Always Right?
120(1)
Constituents (Voters)
121(2)
Businesses
123(1)
Summary
124(1)
Discussion Questions
125(6)
Memo from the Field David A. Narsavage, The Aker Partners, Inc.
125(2)
Case Study 4.1 Criticize Me! Subway and the Crossed-Off Cross-Promotion
127(2)
Case Study 4.2 Swinging for the Wall: Whirlpool Corporation and Habitat for Humanity
129(2)
Key Terms
131(1)
Notes
131(6)
Communication Theory and Public Opinion
137(32)
The Power of Public Opinion
138(1)
A Communication Model
139(4)
QuickBreak 5.1 Mokusatsu
142(1)
Mass Communication Theories
143(6)
The Magic Bullet Theory
143(1)
The Two-Step Theory
144(1)
The N-Step Theory
144(1)
Diffusion Theory
145(1)
The Agenda-Setting Hypothesis
145(1)
QuickBreak 5.2 Why Public Relations Is Not Propaganda
146(1)
Uses and Gratifications Theory
147(1)
A Two-Way Process
148(1)
QuickBreak 5.3 Spinning and Framing
148(1)
Motivation
149(4)
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
150(1)
Examples of Maslow's Theory at Work
151(1)
QuickBreak 5.4 Monroe's Motivated Sequence
152(1)
Persuasion and Public Opinion
153(5)
Aristotle, Persuasion, and Public Relations
153(1)
Public Opinion Defined
154(1)
The Evolution of Public Opinion
155(1)
QuickBreak 5.5 A Public Opinion Checklist
156(1)
Values Statement 5.1 Provincial Emergency Program
157(1)
Persuasion versus Manipulation
157(1)
Summary
158(1)
Discussion Questions
159(7)
Memo from the Field Rene Pelletier, Barometre, Inc.
159(3)
Case Study 5.1 I Decide
162(2)
Case Study 5.2 Color-Coded Confusion
164(2)
Key Terms
166(1)
Notes
166(3)
Ethics and Social Responsibility in Public Relations
169(31)
What Are Ethics?
170(3)
QuickBreak 6.1 The Ethics Codes of PRSA and IABC
171(1)
Ethics Codes for Values-Driven Public Relations
171(2)
Objectivity versus Advocacy: A Misleading Ethics Debate
173(2)
Objectivity versus Advocacy: A Solution
174(1)
QuickBreak 6.2 Aristotle, Confucius, and the Golden Mean
175(1)
Challenges to Ethical Behavior
175(3)
Dilemmas
175(1)
Overwork
176(1)
Legal/Ethical Confusion
176(1)
Cross-Cultural Ethics
177(1)
Short-Term Thinking
177(1)
Virtual Organizations
178(1)
The Rewards of Ethical Behavior
178(1)
QuickBreak 6.3 Immanuel Kant and the Categorical Imperative
179(1)
Trust and Corporate Social Responsibility
179(2)
Corporate Social Responsibility
180(1)
Beyond CSR: Strengthening Ethical Behavior
181(8)
Ethics Audits
181(2)
Integrating Ethics into the Public Relations Process
183(1)
The Potter Box
183(2)
Values Statement 6.1 Goodwill Industries of Orange County
185(1)
The Potter Box at Work
185(2)
QuickBreak 6.4 Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and Utilitarianism
187(1)
QuickBreak 6.5 John Rawls and Social Justice
188(1)
Summary
189(1)
Discussion Questions
190(7)
Memo from the Field Carol Cone, Cone, Inc.
190(3)
Case Study 6.1 Cappuccino with Values, Please: Starbucks Coffee Company
193(2)
Case Study 6.2 Appearance of Obfuscation? Digene Corporation and European Women for HPV Testing
195(2)
Key Terms
197(1)
Notes
197(3)
section two The Public Relations Process
Research and Evaluation
200(38)
Did the Needle Move?
201(2)
Measuring Intangibles
201(1)
QuickBreak 7.1 ROI and AVE
202(1)
The Value of Research and Evaluation
203(2)
QuickBreak 7.2 Issues Management and the Aids Epidemic
204(1)
Developing a Research Strategy: What Do I Want to Know?
205(4)
Client Research
206(1)
Stakeholder Research
206(1)
Problem-Opportunity Research
206(1)
QuickBreak 7.3 Measuring Relationships
207(1)
Values Statement 7.1 Institute for Public Relations
208(1)
Evaluation Research
208(1)
Developing a Research Strategy: How Will I Gather Information?
209(7)
Secondary (Library) Research
210(1)
Feedback Research
210(1)
The Communication Audit
211(2)
Focus Groups
213(3)
Survey Research
216(9)
The Survey Sample
216(1)
QuickBreak 7.4 The Florida Follies
217(6)
The Survey Instrument
223(1)
QuickBreak 7.5 Five Ways to Ask Questions
224(1)
Analyzing Survey Results
225(2)
Back to City Hospital
226(1)
Summary
227(1)
Discussion Questions
227(7)
Memo from the Field Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross, Burson-Marsteller
228(3)
Case Study 7.1 Betting on Terror
231(1)
Case Study 7.2 Fighting Back with Facts
232(2)
Key Terms
234(1)
Notes
235(3)
Planning: The Strategies of Public Relations
238(30)
The Basics of Values-Driven Planning
240(2)
Lessons Learned
241(1)
Different Kinds of Public Relations Plans
242(2)
Ad Hoc Plans
242(1)
Standing Plans
242(1)
Contingency Plans
243(1)
QuickBreak 8.1 Planning for the Entire Organization
243(1)
Why Do We Plan?
244(3)
To Keep Our Actions in Line with Our Organization's Values-Based Mission
245(1)
To Help Us Control Our Destiny
245(1)
To Help Us Better Understand and Focus Our Research
245(1)
To Help Us Achieve Consensus
246(1)
To Allow Effective Management of Resources
246(1)
Values Statement 8.1 Boeing Company
246(1)
How Do We Plan?
247(9)
Consensus Building
247(1)
Brainstorming
248(1)
Goals, Objectives, and Tactics: The Written Plan
249(3)
QuickBreak 8.2 The PRSA Planning Grid
252(4)
QuickBreak 8.3 The Swot Analysis
256(1)
Expanding a Plan into a Proposal
256(1)
Qualities of a Good Plan
257(1)
Summary
258(1)
Discussion Questions
258(7)
Memo from the Field Timothy S. Brown, Conectiv
259(2)
Case Study 8.1 Boeing, Boeing, Gone
261(2)
Case Study 8.2 Mess at Maryville: A Private Plan Goes Public
263(2)
Key Terms
265(1)
Notes
266(2)
Communication: The Tactics of Public Relations
268(41)
Communicating with Specific Publics
269(1)
Tactics as Messages and Channels
270(6)
Special Events
271(1)
Controlled Media
272(1)
QuickBreak 9.1 Kisses, Tea Parties, and Pseudoevents
273(1)
Uncontrolled Media
273(1)
Controlled versus Uncontrolled Media
274(1)
Values Statement 9.1 Johnson & Johnson
275(1)
Tactics and Traditional Publics
276(20)
Employees
276(3)
News Media
279(7)
Investors
286(1)
QuickBreak 9.2 Beating the Odds: Successful News Releases
287(1)
QuickBreak 9.3 The VNR That Went Too Far?
288(1)
Community Groups
289(2)
Governments
291(1)
Customers
292(3)
QuickBreak 9.4 Net Gains
295(1)
Constituents (Voters)
295(1)
Businesses
296(1)
Accomplishing the Tactics
296(3)
Summary
299(1)
Discussion Questions
300(6)
Memo from the Field Shirley Barr, Shirleybarr Public Relations
300(2)
Case Study 9.1 The Great Canadian Cover-Up
302(2)
Case Study 9.2 ``Emily, Get Out of the Way''
304(2)
Key Terms
306(1)
Notes
306(3)
Writing and Presentation Skills
309(40)
The Importance of Writing and Presentation Skills
310(1)
A Context for Public Relations Writing
311(1)
The Writing Process
311(19)
Credibility: Stage One of the Writing Process
314(1)
QuickBreak 10.1 Writing for Diverse Publics: Tips for Inclusive Language
315(1)
Research: Stage Two of the Writing Process
316(2)
Organization: Stage Three of the Writing Process
318(4)
QuickBreak 10.2 Ten Tips for Writing Better Sentences
322(1)
Writing: Stage Four of the Writing Process
323(1)
Revision: Stage Five of the Writing Process
324(1)
Macroediting: Stage Six of the Writing Process
325(1)
Microediting: Stage Seven of the Writing Process
326(1)
Approval: Stage Eight of the Writing Process
327(2)
Distribution: Stage Nine of the Writing Process
329(1)
Evaluation: Stage Ten of the Writing Process
329(1)
Writing for the Ear
330(3)
QuickBreak 10.3 Grammar on the Web
331(2)
The Process of Successful Presentations
333(7)
Values Statement 10.1 Kellogg Company
334(1)
Researching Your Presentation
334(1)
Planning Your Presentation
335(3)
Making Your Presentation
338(1)
QuickBreak 10.4 Conquering the Presentation Jitters
339(1)
Evaluating Your Presentation
339(1)
Summary
340(1)
Discussion Questions
340(6)
Memo from the Field Regina Lynch-Hudson, The Write Publicist
341(1)
Case Study 10.1 Plastic Couple Splits
342(2)
Case Study 10.2 Online Outrage: Emulex and the Fake News Release
344(2)
Key Terms
346(1)
Notes
347(2)
Public Relations in the Digital Age
349(40)
Welcome to the Revolution
350(3)
Messages and Media
351(2)
The Role of Values in Message and Medium Selection
353(1)
The Digital Revolution
353(4)
Convergence and Hypermedia
354(1)
Convergence Issues
355(2)
Virtual Public Relations
357(1)
Computers and the Internet
357(12)
The New Town Commons
358(1)
Values Statement 11.1 Ink, Inc.
359(2)
The Birth of Cyber-Relations
361(1)
Individuals as Gatekeepers
362(1)
Individuals as Publishers
362(1)
QuickBreak 11.1 Building a Better Web Site
363(2)
Other Internet Issues
365(1)
QuickBreak 11.2 The Millennium Bug
366(3)
Wireless Communications Technology
369(5)
QuickBreak 11.3 Satellite Media Tours
370(1)
Satellite Communications
371(1)
QuickBreak 11.4 Viral Marketing
372(2)
Why New Isn't Always Better
374(1)
Summary
375(1)
Discussion Questions
375(9)
Memo from the Field Craig Settles, Successful.Com
376(3)
Case Study 11.1 Big Mama Is Watching
379(2)
Case Study 11.2 Caught in the Eye of Hurricane Chad
381(3)
Key Terms
384(1)
Notes
385(4)
section three Public Relations Today and Tomorrow
Crisis Communications
389(39)
A New ``Day of Infamy''
390(3)
Putting Crisis Plans in Action
392(1)
Crises Can Happen to Anyone
393(1)
The Anatomy of a Crisis
393(9)
QuickBreak 12.1 Textbook Examples: Exxon and Tylenol
394(1)
What Is a Crisis?
395(1)
Crisis Dynamics
396(2)
A Tale of Two Shuttle Disasters
398(2)
QuickBreak 12.2 Are You Ready?
400(1)
Crises Can Bring Opportunity
401(1)
Crisis Communications Planning
402(13)
Step One: Risk Assessment
403(2)
QuickBreak 12.3 The Crisis Plotting Grid
405(1)
Step Two: Developing the Plan
406(6)
QuickBreak 12.4 Things to Do Before a Crisis Breaks
412(1)
Step Three: Response
413(1)
Step Four: Recovery
414(1)
Crisis Planning Ethics
415(2)
Values Statement 12.1 Department of Homeland Security
415(2)
Summary
417(1)
Discussion Questions
417(7)
Memo from the Field Wayne Shelor, Clearwater (Florida) Police Department
418(2)
Case Study 12.1 Blame Canada
420(1)
Case Study 12.2 Embedded Journalists
421(3)
Key Terms
424(1)
Notes
425(3)
Public Relations and Marketing
428(29)
Public Relations and Marketing
429(4)
The Decline of Mass Marketing
429(1)
The Growth of Consumer-Focused Marketing
430(1)
QuickBreak 13.1 IMC and More
431(1)
Public Relations, Advertising, and Marketing: Working Together
432(1)
The Impact of Consumer-Focused Marketing on Public Relations
433(2)
The Impact of Public Relations on Consumer-Focused Marketing
433(1)
Values Statement 13.1 J.M. Smucker Company
434(1)
Differences between Public Relations and Consumer-Focused Marketing
434(1)
A Closer Look at Marketing
435(2)
Marketing Public Relations
436(1)
A Closer Look at IMC
437(4)
Focusing on Individual Consumers
438(1)
Sending One Clear Message
438(1)
QuickBreak 13.2 The Fall of Advertising?
439(2)
How IMC Works
441(5)
Creating an IMC Campaign
442(2)
Applying IMC
444(1)
QuickBreak 13.3 DM: The New Kid in Town
445(1)
Problems with 21st-Century Marketing
446(2)
QuickBreak 13.4 Data Danger: Kids and Europeans
447(1)
Summary
448(1)
Discussion Questions
448(6)
Memo from the Field Vin Cipolla, HNW, Inc.
449(1)
Case Study 13.1 Revolvolution
450(2)
Case Study 13.2 Flunking History: Umbro and the Holocaust
452(2)
Key Terms
454(1)
Notes
454(3)
Cross-Cultural Communication
457(30)
Cultures: Realities and Definitions
458(2)
International Public Relations
460(1)
Cultural Attributes
460(6)
Attitudes about Time
461(1)
Attitudes about Formality
461(1)
Attitudes about Individualism
462(1)
Values Statement 14.1 Special Olympics
463(1)
Attitudes about Rank and Hierarchy
463(1)
Attitudes about Religion
463(1)
Attitudes about Taste and Diet
463(1)
QuickBreak 14.1 The Melting-Pot Myth
464(1)
Attitudes about Colors, Numbers, and Symbols
464(1)
Attitudes about Assimilation and Acculturation
465(1)
Cross-Cultural Communication: Definitions and Dangers
466(3)
Encoding and Decoding
466(1)
Gestures and Clothing
467(1)
Stereotyping
468(1)
Achieving Successful Cross-Cultural Public Relations: A Process
469(8)
Stage One: Awareness
469(1)
QuickBreak 14.2 Diversity in Public Relations
470(1)
Stage Two: Commitment
471(1)
Stage Three: Research
471(1)
QuickBreak 14.3 What's Your CL Rating?
472(1)
Stage Four: Local Partnership
472(1)
Stage Five: Diversity
473(1)
Stage Six: Testing
473(1)
Stage Seven: Evaluation
473(1)
Stage Eight: Advocacy
473(2)
QuickBreak 14.4 Double-Whammy Culture Clash
475(1)
Stage Nine: Continuing Education
475(2)
Summary
477(1)
Discussion Questions
477(6)
Memo from the Field Bill Imada, IW Group
478(1)
Case Study 14.1 Pitney Bowes Sends a Message
479(2)
Case Study 14.2 Zakazukha!
481(2)
Key Terms
483(1)
Notes
483(4)
Public Relations and the Law
487(42)
A Parade of Corporate Horrors
488(2)
Public Relations, the Law, and You
489(1)
Public Relations and the First Amendment
490(4)
Political versus Commercial Speech
491(1)
The Key: Know Your Own Business
492(1)
QuickBreak 15.1 Kasky V. Nike
493(1)
Federal Agencies That Regulate Speech
494(9)
The Federal Trade Commission
494(1)
The Securities and Exchange Commission
495(3)
QuickBreak 15.2 Sec Rule 10b-5
498(2)
The Federal Communications Commission
500(1)
Values Statement 15.1 Federal Communications Commission
501(1)
The Food and Drug Administration
502(1)
Libel
503(3)
The Burden of Proof in Libel
503(1)
Actual Malice
504(1)
Other Forms of Libel
505(1)
Privacy
506(3)
The Four Torts of Privacy
506(1)
QuickBreak 15.3 The Pursuit of Privacy
507(1)
Privacy Issues in Public Relations
508(1)
Copyright
509(4)
Copyright Guidelines
509(1)
The Digital Millennium Copyright Act
510(1)
QuickBreak 15.4 Online Music Piracy
511(1)
Fair Use
512(1)
Protecting Your Intellectual Property Rights
512(1)
Litigation Public Relations
513(4)
Public Relations as a Legal Strategy
514(1)
The Use of LPR Tactics
514(2)
Is LPR in Society's Best Interests?
516(1)
Summary
517(1)
Discussion Questions
517(7)
Memo from the Field James F. Haggerty, The PR Consulting Group, Inc.
518(1)
Case Study 15.1 Higher Standards?
519(2)
Case Study 15.2 In Search of Sunshine
521(3)
Key Terms
524(1)
Notes
524(5)
Your Future in Public Relations
529(35)
What's Next?
530(2)
QuickBreak 16.1 Gunggongguanxi
531(1)
Social Forces and Public Relations
532(11)
The Global Spread of Democracy
532(1)
Globalization
533(1)
The Changing Face of the United States
533(2)
The Growth in World Population
535(2)
QuickBreak 16.2 The Hispanic and Latino Factor
537(2)
QuickBreak 16.3 What Would Jesus Drive?
539(1)
Feminization of the Workplace
540(1)
QuickBreak 16.4 Sexual Harassment
541(2)
Values Statement 16.1 League of Women Voters of the United States
543(1)
Where Public Relations Is Headed
543(3)
Your Future in Public Relations
546(5)
QuickBreak 16.5 You Are the Future
547(2)
The Future of Values-Driven Public Relations
549(2)
Summary
551(1)
Discussion Questions
552(7)
Memo from the Field Sarah Yeaney, 2004-2005 National President, PRSSA
552(1)
Case Study 16.1 Shared Sacrifice?
553(2)
Case Study 16.2 PR in the Face of Terror
555(4)
Key Terms
559(1)
Notes
560(4)
Appendix Public Relations Society of America Member Code of Ethics 2000 564(7)
Glossary 571(16)
Index 587


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