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Public Speaking : An Audience-Centered Approach,9780205449835
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Public Speaking : An Audience-Centered Approach

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780205449835

ISBN10:
0205449832
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
PEARSON EDUCATION

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2009.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

Summary

Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach brings theory and practice together in an understandable and applicable manner. Its distinctive and popular approach emphasizes the importance of analyzing and considering the audience at every point along the way, with marginal icons highlighting audience-related discussions. This model of public speaking serves as a foundation as the text guides students through the step-by-step process of public speaking, focuses their attention on the importance and dynamics of diverse audiences, and narrows the gap between the classroom and the real world. New and Exciting Features bull; bull;A ";talking"; version of the Audience-Centered Speech-Making Wheel appears on the inside front cover for easy reference. bull;Expanded coverage of speaking with confidence, including applications of the latest communication research with concrete suggestions to help students better manage speaker anxiety and communication apprehension, has been moved to Chapter 1 to encourage speaking with confidence right from the start. bull;";Developing Your Speech Step-by-Step"; boxes provide a model for students as they work on their own speeches. Students follow the steps of a successful student speaker as she works through the speech-making process. bull;";Great Speakers"; boxes feature profiles and photos of contemporary and classic speakers. Students see how speech-making techniques have worked for the experts. bull;Coverage of editing a speech has been added to Chapter 11. bull;A new section providing strategies for responding to questions during a speech has been added to Chapter 13. bull;MySpeechLab (www.myspeechlab.com) is a state-of-the-art, interactive and instructive solution for introductory public speaking and accompanies the new 6th EDITION of Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach. Designed to be used as a supplement to a traditional lecture course, or to completely administer an online course, MySpeechLab combines an E-book, multimedia, video clips, speech preparation activities, research support, tests and quizzes to completely engage students. bull;Video clips, available on MySpeechLab for sample speeches featured in the text, allow students to see and hear the model speeches. Praise for Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach";I have seen a number of speech textbooks in my teaching career. I think the Beebe and Beebe text is one of the best on the market. There is a good theory base and practical, hands-on examples for students to use.";";The students have said to me that they're glad there isn't a lot of 'dry, boring stuff' in the text. Little do they know, but the 'theory stuff' is in there, but it isn't dry and boring. "; Ann Marie Jablonowski, Owens Community College";I love the information on classical rhetoric-where was this information when I needed it?-so clear, so concise and so organized. "; Linda Kurz, University of Missouri- Kansas City";Your book does a great job of explaining the theory and then giving practical examples of how to apply it. "; Cara Schollenberger, Bucks Country Community College";Kudos to Beebe and Beebe for including the various aspects of culture such as individualistic and collectivistic....;"; Carla J. Harrell, Old Dominion University

Table of Contents

Preface xx
Speaking with Confidence
1(22)
Why Study Public Speaking?
2(1)
Empowerment
2(1)
Employment
3(1)
Public Speaking and Conversation
3(2)
Public Speaking Is Planned
4(1)
Public Speaking Is Formal
4(1)
The Roles of Public Speakers and Audiences Are Clearly Defined
4(1)
The Communication Process
5(2)
Communication as Action
5(1)
Communication as Interaction
6(1)
Communication as Transaction
7(1)
The Rich Heritage of Public Speaking
7(1)
Great Speakers: Martin Luther King Jr. (1929--1968)
8(2)
Public Speaking and Diversity
10(1)
Improving Your Confidence as a Speaker
11(6)
Understand Your Nervousness
11(2)
Build Your Confidence
13(4)
Summary
17(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Managing Your Nervousness
18(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
18(5)
The Audience-Centered Speechmaking Process
23(18)
An Audience-Centered Speechmaking Modei
24(1)
Consider Your Audience
25(1)
Select and Narrow Your Topic
26(1)
Who Is the Audience?
26(1)
Great Speakers: Abraham Lincoln (1809--1865)
26(1)
What Is the Occasion?
27(1)
What Are My Interests, Talents, and Experiences?
27(1)
Determine Your Purpose
27(2)
Develop Your Central Idea
29(1)
Generate the Main Ideas
29(1)
Does the Central Idea Have Logical Divisions?
29(1)
Can You Think of Several Reasons the Central Idea Is True?
30(1)
Can You Support the Central Idea with a Series of Steps?
30(1)
Gather Verbal and Visual Supporting Material
30(2)
Organize Your Speech
32(1)
Sample Outline
32(2)
Rehearse Your Speech
34(1)
Speaker's Homepage: The Power of the Internet
35(1)
Deliver Your Speech
36(1)
Sample Speech: Our Immigration Story by Pao Yang Lee
36(2)
Summary
38(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
38(3)
Ethics and Free Speech
41(16)
Speaking Freely
43(2)
Speaking Ethically
45(2)
Have a Clear, Responsible Goal
45(1)
Use Sound Evidence and Reasoning
45(1)
Be Sensitive to and Tolerant of Differences
46(1)
Be Honest
46(1)
Great Speakers: Mohandas Gandhi (1869--1948)
47(2)
Avoid Plagiarism
47(2)
Sample Oral Citation
49(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Tips for Ethics and Free Speech
50(1)
Listening Ethically
51(2)
Communicate Your Expectations and Feedback
51(1)
Be Sensitive to and Tolerant of Differences
51(1)
Listen Critically
52(1)
Summary
53(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
53(4)
Listening to Speeches
57(26)
Barriers to Effective Listening
58(4)
Information Overload
59(1)
Personal Concerns
59(1)
Outside Distractions
60(1)
Prejudice
60(1)
Differences between Speech Rate and Thought Rate
61(1)
Receiver Apprehension
61(1)
Becoming a Better Listener
62(6)
Adapt to the Speaker's Delivery
63(1)
Listen with Your Eyes as Well as Your Ears
63(1)
Monitor Your Emotional Reaction to a Message
63(1)
Avoid Jumping to Conclusions
63(1)
Be a Selfish Listener
64(1)
Listen for Major Ideas
64(1)
Identify Your Listening Goal
64(2)
Practice Listening
66(1)
Understand Your Listening Style
66(1)
Become an Active Listener
67(1)
Great Speakers: Cesar Chavez (1927--1993)
68(1)
Improving Your Note-Taking Skills
69(1)
Listening and Critical Thinking
70(2)
Separate Facts from Inferences
70(1)
Evaluate the Quality of Evidence
71(1)
Evaluate the Underlying Logic and Reasoning
71(1)
Analyzing and Evaluating Speeches
72(4)
Understanding Criteria for Evaluating Speeches
72(2)
Identifying and Analyzing Rhetorical Strategies
74(2)
Speaker's Homepage: Developing Your Rhetorical Listening Skills
76(3)
Giving Feedback to Others
76(2)
Giving Feedback to Yourself
78(1)
Summary
79(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
79(4)
Analyzing Your Audience
83(32)
Becoming an Audience-Centered Speaker
84(4)
Gather Information about Your Audience
85(2)
Analyze Information about Your Audience
87(1)
Great Speakers: Winston Churchill (1874--1965)
88(2)
Adapt to Your Audience
89(1)
Analyzing Your Audience before You Speak
90(13)
Demographic Audience Analysis
90(7)
Psychological Audience Analysis
97(3)
Situational Audience Analysis
100(3)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Consider Your Audience
103(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Gathering Information about Your Audience
104(1)
Adapting to Your Audience as You Speak
104(5)
Identifying Nonverbal Audience Cues
105(1)
Responding to Nonverbal Cues
105(3)
Strategies for Customizing Your Message to Your Audience
108(1)
Analyzing Your Audience after You Speak
109(1)
Nonverbal Responses
109(1)
Verbal Responses
109(1)
Survey Responses
109(1)
Behavioral Responses
110(1)
Summary
110(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
110(5)
Developing Your Speech
115(24)
Select and Narrow Your Topic
117(5)
Guidelines for Selecting a Topic
117(2)
Strategies for Selecting a Topic
119(3)
Speaker's Homepage: Using the Web to Prime Your Creative Pump for a Speech Topic
122(1)
Narrowing the Topic
122(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Select and Narrow Your Topic
122(1)
Determine Your Purpose
123(4)
General Purpose
123(1)
Specific Purpose
124(3)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Determine Your Purpose
127(1)
Develop Your Central Idea
127(2)
A Complete Declarative Sentence
128(1)
Direct, Specific Language
128(1)
A Single Idea
129(1)
An Audience-Centered Idea
129(1)
Great Speakers: Frederick Douglass (1817--1895)
129(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Develop Your Central Idea
130(1)
Generate and Preview Your Main Ideas
131(2)
Generating Your Main Ideas
131(2)
Previewing Your Main Ideas
133(1)
Meanwhile, Back at the Computer. . .
133(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Generate and Preview Your Main Ideas
134(1)
Summary
135(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
135(4)
Gathering Supporting Material
139(28)
Personal Knowledge and Experience
140(1)
The Internet
140(5)
The World Wide Web
141(1)
Directories and Search Engines
141(1)
Evaluating Web Resources
142(3)
Speaker's Homepage: Evaluating Web Sites
145(1)
Library Resources
145(6)
Books
145(2)
Periodicals
147(1)
Full-Text Databases
148(1)
Newspapers
148(1)
Reference Resources
149(1)
Government Documents
150(1)
Special Services
150(1)
Interviews
151(1)
Determining the Purpose of the Interview
151(1)
Great Speakers: Eleanor Roosevelt (1884--1962)
152(3)
Setting Up the Interview
152(1)
Planning the Interview
152(2)
Conducting the Interview
154(1)
Following Up the Interview
154(1)
Resources from Special-Interest Groups and Organizations
155(1)
Research Strategies
155(4)
Develop a Preliminary Bibliography
155(3)
Locate Resources
158(1)
Evaluate the Usefulness of Resources
159(1)
Take Notes
159(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Gather Supporting Material
159(3)
Identify Possible Presentation Aids
160(2)
Summary
162(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
163(4)
Supporting Your Speech
167(20)
Illustrations
168(3)
Brief Illustrations
169(1)
Extended Illustrations
169(1)
Hypothetical Illustrations
170(1)
Using Illustrations Effectively
170(1)
Great Speakers: Garrison Keillor (1942-)
171(1)
Descriptions and Explanations
171(2)
Describing
171(1)
Explaining How
172(1)
Explaining Why
172(1)
Using Descriptions and Explanations Effectively
173(1)
Definitions
173(2)
Definitions by Classification
173(1)
Operational Definitions
174(1)
Using Definitions Effectively
174(1)
Analogies
175(1)
Literal Analogies
175(1)
Figurative Analogies
175(1)
Using Analogies Effectively
176(1)
Statistics
176(3)
Using Statistics as Support
177(1)
Using Statistics Effectively
177(2)
Opinions
179(3)
Expert Testimony
180(1)
Lay Testimony
180(1)
Literary Quotations
180(1)
Using Opinions Effectively
180(2)
Speaker's Homepage: Using the Internet to Find Interesting Supporting Material
182(1)
Selecting the Best Supporting Material
183(1)
Summary
183(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
184(3)
Organizing Your Speech
187(24)
Organizing Your Main Ideas
189(7)
Ordering Ideas Chronologically
189(2)
Organizing Ideas Topically
191(1)
Arranging Ideas Spatially
192(1)
Organizing Ideas to Show Cause and Effect
193(1)
Organizing Ideas by Problem and Solution
194(1)
Acknowledging Cultural Differences in Organization
195(1)
Great Speakers: Desmond Tutu (1931-)
196(1)
Subdividing Your Main Ideas
196(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Internet Resources to Help You Organize Your Speech
197(1)
Integrating Your Supporting Material
197(1)
Sample Integration of Supporting Material
198(1)
Organizing Your Supporting Material
198(2)
Primacy or Recency
199(1)
Specificity
199(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Organize Your Speech
200(1)
Complexity
200(1)
From Soft to Hard Evidence
200(1)
Developing Signposts
201(4)
Transitions
202(1)
Previews
203(1)
Summaries
204(1)
Supplementing Signposts with Presentation Aids
205(1)
Summary
206(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
207(4)
Introducing and Concluding Your Speech
211(22)
Purposes of Introductions
212(4)
Get the Audience's Attention
213(1)
Introduce the Subject
213(1)
Give the Audience a Reason to Listen
213(1)
Establish Your Credibility
214(1)
Preview Your Main Ideas
215(1)
Effective Introductions
216(6)
Illustrations or Anecdotes
216(1)
Startling Facts or Statistics
217(1)
Quotations
217(1)
Humor
218(1)
Questions
219(1)
References to Historic Events
220(1)
References to Recent Events
220(1)
Personal References
221(1)
References to the Occasion
221(1)
References to Preceding Speeches
222(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Using the Web to Find an Attention-Catching Introduction
222(1)
Purposes of Conclusions
223(2)
Summarize the Speech
223(1)
Reemphasize the Central Idea in a Memorable Way
224(1)
Motivate the Audience to Respond
224(1)
Provide Closure
225(1)
Effective Conclusions
225(2)
Methods Also Used for Introductions
225(1)
References to the Introduction
226(1)
Inspirational Appeals or Challenges
227(1)
Great Speakers: Patrick Henry (1736--1799)
227(1)
Appeals to Action
228(1)
Summary
228(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
229(4)
Outlining and Editing Your Speech
233(20)
Developing Your Preparation Outline
234(4)
The Preparation Outline
235(2)
Sample Preparation Outline
237(1)
Sample Preparation Outline
238(2)
Editing Your Speech
240(2)
Developing Your Delivery Outline and Speaking Notes
242(2)
The Delivery Outline
242(2)
Sample Delivery Outline
244(1)
Sample Delivery Outline
244(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Using Internet Resources to Improve Your Outlining Skill
245(3)
Speaking Notes
246(2)
Great Speakers: Mark Twain (1835--1910)
248(1)
Summary
249(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
250(3)
Using Words Well: Speaker Language and Style
253(20)
Oral versus Written Language Style
255(1)
Oral Style Is More Personal Than Written Style
255(1)
Oral Style Is Less Formal Than Written Style
255(1)
Oral Style Is More Repetitive Than Written Style
256(1)
Using Words Effectively
256(3)
Use Specific Concrete Words
256(1)
Use Simple Words
257(1)
Use Words Correctly
258(1)
Adapting Your Language Style to Diverse Listeners
259(2)
Use Language That Your Audience Can Understand
259(1)
Use Appropriate Language
259(1)
Use Unbiased Language
260(1)
Crafting Memorable Word Structures
261(4)
Creating Figurative Images
262(1)
Creating Drama
262(1)
Creating Cadence
263(2)
Speaker's Homepage: Using Internet Resources to Polish Your Spoken Prose
265(2)
Analyzing an Example of Memorable Word Structure
266(1)
Great Speakers: John F. Kennedy (1917--1963)
267(1)
Tips for Using Language Effectively
267(1)
Summary
268(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
269(4)
Delivering Your Speech
273(32)
The Power of Speech Delivery
274(2)
Listeners Expect Effective Delivery
275(1)
Listeners Make Emotional Connections with You through Delivery
275(1)
Listeners Believe What They See
276(1)
Methods of Delivery
276(4)
Manuscript Speaking
276(1)
Memorized Speaking
277(1)
Impromptu Speaking
277(2)
Extemporaneous Speaking
279(1)
Characteristics of Effective Delivery
280(6)
Eye Contact
281(1)
Gestures
282(2)
Movement
284(1)
Posture
285(1)
Facial Expression
286(1)
Vocal Delivery
286(1)
Great Speakers: Marcus Tullius Cicero (106--43 B.C.)
286(6)
Personal Appearance
291(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Evaluating Speaker Delivery
292(1)
Audience Diversity and Delivery
293(1)
Rehearsing Your Speech: Some Final Tips
294(1)
Delivering Your Speech
295(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Rehearse Your Speech
296(1)
Adapting Your Speech Delivery for Television
297(1)
Developing Your Speech Step by Step: Deliver Your Speech
298(1)
Responding to Questions
299(1)
Summary
300(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
301(4)
Using Presentation Aids
305(28)
The Value of Presentation Aids
306(2)
Great Speakers: Ronald Reagan (1911--2004)
308(1)
Types of Presentation Aids
308(11)
Three-Dimensional Presentation Aids
308(2)
Two-Dimensional Presentation Aids
310(9)
Speaker's Homepage: Using the Internet as a Source for Visuals for Your Speeches
319(3)
Audiovisual Aids
320(2)
Guidelines for Developing Presentation Aids
322(2)
Make Them Easy to See
322(1)
Keep Them Simple
322(1)
Select the Right Presentation Aids
323(1)
Do Not Use Dangerous or Illegal Presentation Aids
324(1)
Guidelines for Using Presentation Aids
324(4)
Rehearse with Your Presentation Aids
324(1)
Make Eye Contact with Your Audience, Not with Your Presentation Aids
324(1)
Explain Your Presentation Aids
325(1)
Do Not Pass Objects among Members of Your Audience
325(1)
Use Animals with Caution
325(1)
Use Handouts Effectively
325(1)
Time the Use of Visuals to Control Your Audience's Attention
326(1)
Use Technology Effectively
327(1)
Remember Murphy's Law
328(1)
Summary
328(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
329(4)
Speaking to Inform
333(20)
Goals of Informative Speaking
334(2)
Speaking to Enhance Understanding
335(1)
Speaking to Maintain Interest
335(1)
Speaking to Be Remembered
335(1)
Types of Informative Speeches
336(5)
Speeches about Objects
336(1)
Speeches about Procedures
337(1)
Speeches about People
338(1)
Speeches about Events
339(1)
Speeches about Ideas
339(2)
Strategies to Enhance Audience Understanding
341(3)
Speak with Clarity
341(1)
Use Principles and Techniques of Adult Learning
342(1)
Clarify Complex Processes
342(2)
Use Effective Visual Reinforcement
344(1)
Strategies to Maintain Audience Interest
344(1)
Establish a Motive for Your Audience to Listen to You
344(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Finding Late-Breaking News and Information for Your Speech
345(1)
Tell a Story
345(1)
Great Speakers: Beverly Sills (1929-)
346(1)
Present Information That Relates to Your Listeners
346(1)
Strategies to Enhance Audience Recall
346(2)
Build in Redundancy
346(1)
Pace Your Information Flow
347(1)
Reinforce Key Ideas Verbally
347(1)
Reinforce Key Ideas Nonverbally
347(1)
Sample Informative Speech: Choosing a Speech Topic by Roger Fringer
348(1)
Summary
349(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
349(4)
Understanding Principles of Persuasive Speaking
353(22)
Persuasion Defined
354(2)
How Persuasion Works
356(1)
How to Motivate Listeners
357(6)
Use Dissonance
357(2)
Use Listener Needs
359(2)
Use Positive Motivation
361(1)
Use Negative Motivation
362(1)
Great Speakers: Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815--1902)
363(1)
How to Develop Your Persuasive Speech
364(5)
Consider the Audience
364(1)
Select and Narrow Your Persuasive Topic
365(1)
Determine Your Persuasive Purpose
366(1)
Develop Your Central Idea and Main Ideas
366(3)
Putting Persuasive Principles into Practice
369(2)
Speaker's Homepage: Finding Out about Congressional Legislation for Persuasive Speeches
371(1)
Summary
371(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
372(3)
Using Persuasive Strategies
375(36)
Establishing Credibility
376(1)
Enhancing Your Credibility
377(1)
Using Logic and Evidence to Persuade
378(10)
Understanding Types of Reasoning
379(4)
Persuading the Diverse Audience
383(2)
Supporting Your Reasoning with Evidence
385(1)
Avoiding Faulty Reasoning: Ethical Issues
386(2)
Using Emotion to Persuade
388(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Information Triage: Identifying Reasoning Fallacies
389(1)
Great Speakers: Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882--1945)
389(4)
Tips for Using Emotion to Persuade
390(2)
Using Emotional Appeals: Ethical Issues
392(1)
Strategies for Adapting Ideas to People and People to Ideas
393(4)
Persuading the Receptive Audience
394(1)
Persuading the Neutral Audience
395(1)
Persuading the Unreceptive Audience
395(2)
Strategies for Organizing Persuasive Messages
397(6)
Problem-Solution
397(1)
Refutation
398(1)
Cause and Effect
399(1)
The Motivated Sequence
399(4)
Sample Persuasive Speech: Medical Mayhem by Alyssa Horn
403(3)
Summary
406(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
407(4)
Special-Occasion Speaking
411(18)
Public Speaking in the Workplace
412(2)
Reports
412(1)
Public-Relations Speeches
413(1)
Ceremonial Speaking
414(2)
Introductions
414(1)
Toasts
415(1)
Speaker's Homepage: A Toast to You and Yours: Tips for Making Toasts
416(5)
Award Presentations
416(1)
Nominations
417(1)
Acceptances
417(1)
Keynote Addresses
418(1)
Commencement Addresses
419(1)
Commemorative Addresses and Tributes
420(1)
Eulogies
420(1)
After-Dinner Speaking: Using Humor Effectively
421(3)
Humorous Stories
422(1)
Humorous Verbal Strategies
422(1)
Humorous Nonverbal Strategies
423(1)
Great Speakers: Dave Barry (1947-)
424(1)
Summary
424(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
425(4)
Speaking in Small Groups
429(22)
Solving Problems in Groups and Teams
431(3)
Identify and Define the Problem
431(1)
Analyze the Problem
432(1)
Generate Possible Solutions
432(1)
Select the Best Solution
433(1)
Test and Implement the Solution
434(1)
Participating in Small Groups
434(2)
Come Prepared for Group Discussions
434(1)
Do Not Suggest Solutions before Analyzing the Problem
435(1)
Evaluate Evidence
435(1)
Help Summarize the Group's Progress
435(1)
Listen and Respond Courteously to Others
435(1)
Help Manage Conflict
435(1)
Leading Small Groups
436(2)
Leadership Responsibilities
436(1)
Leadership Styles
436(2)
Managing Meetings
438(2)
How to Give Meetings Structure
439(1)
How to Foster Meeting Interaction
439(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Using Parliamentary Procedure to Give Structure to Large Groups
440(1)
Presenting Group Recommendations
441(1)
Great Speakers: Oprah Winfrey (1954-)
442(1)
Symposium Presentation
442(1)
Forum Presentation
442(1)
Panel Discussion
442(1)
Written Report
443(1)
Planning a Group Presentation
443(1)
Making a Group Presentation
444(1)
Summary
445(1)
Being Audience-Centered: A Sharper Focus
445(4)
Epilogue
449(1)
Speaker's Homepage: Learning More about Communication
450(1)
APPENDIX A The Classical Tradition of Rhetoric
451(8)
Thomas R. Burkholder
The Earliest Teachers of Rhetoric
451(1)
Beginning of the Greek Tradition: The Sophists
452(1)
Plato
453(1)
Aristotle
454(1)
The Roman Tradition
455(1)
Conclusion
456(3)
APPENDIX B Speeches for Analysis and Discussion
459(16)
I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King Jr.
459(2)
Making Democracy Work: Your Responsibility to Society by Cynthia Opheim
461(2)
Van Gogh's Incredible Life by Kristy Shaw
463(3)
The Electoral College by Nathan Harrington
466(2)
The Dirty Secret by Ben Johnson
468(2)
Binge Drinking on College Campuses by Ali Heidarpour
470(2)
Curtailing the Contemporary College Counseling Crisis by Sonja Ralston
472(3)
Endnotes 475(12)
Index 487


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