CART

(0) items

The Quest for Ecstatic Morality in Early China,9780199941742

The Quest for Ecstatic Morality in Early China

by
ISBN13:

9780199941742

ISBN10:
0199941742
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/15/2013
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press
List Price: $29.95

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$25.46

Buy New Textbook

Usually Ships in 3-5 Business Days
N9780199941742
$29.20

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $10.54
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 3/15/2013.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

There is an intense love of freedom evident in the "Xing zi mingchu," a text last seen when it was buried in a Chinese tomb in 300 B.C.E. It tells us that both joy and sadness are the ecstatic zenith of what the text terms "qing." Combining emotions intoqingallows them to serve as a stepping stone to the Dao, the transcendent source of morality for the world. There is a process one must follow to prepareqing: it must be beautified by learning from the classics written by ancient sages. What is absent from the process is any indication that the emotions themselves need to be suppressed or regulated, as is found in most other texts from this time. The Confucian principles of humanity and righteousness are not rejected, but they are seen as needing ourqingand the Dao. Holloway argues that the Dao here is the same Dao of Laozi'sDaode jing. As a missing link between what came to be called Confucianism and Daoism, the "Xing zi mingchu" is changing the way we look at the history of religion in early China.

Author Biography


Kenneth Holloway is Associate Professor of History and Levenson Professor of Asian Studies at Florida Atlantic University.


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...