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Readers and Writers in the Primary Grades: A Balanced and Integrated Approach,9780130931504
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Readers and Writers in the Primary Grades: A Balanced and Integrated Approach

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780130931504

ISBN10:
0130931500
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $80.00

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This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 1/1/2002.
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Summary

For reading, writing, and literacy in elementary school courses. Readers and Writers in Primary Grades is organized around strategies that benefit teachers in their efforts to be responsive to the developmental literacy needs of young children. Integrating theory and practice, these strategies offer a balanced look at appropriate literacy activities for K-3 classrooms.

Table of Contents

Part I Literacy Methods for K--3 Classrooms
1(428)
Reading and Writing in the Primary Grades: A Balanced and Integrated Approach
2(22)
Looking into Classrooms
3(1)
Building a Theory Base
4(16)
Defining Literacy
4(1)
A Framework for Literacy
5(3)
Children's Literacy Development
8(4)
Meaningful Learning Environments
12(5)
The Teacher's Role in Literacy Development
17(2)
Assessment: Monitoring Children's Literacy Development
19(1)
Respecting Diversity among Children
19(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
20(2)
Your Turn
22(2)
Reading Aloud to Children
24(44)
Looking into Classrooms
25(1)
Building A Theory Base
26(10)
Language at Home
26(3)
Language at School
29(1)
Developing an Ear for the Sounds of Language
29(1)
Developing Expectations for Written Language
30(1)
Developing Expectations for Different Genre
31(1)
Thinking Like a Reader
32(1)
Thinking about Written Language
33(3)
Take a Moment to Reflect
36(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
37(29)
Engaging Children with Books
38(1)
Reading Aloud Is an Invitation into Books
38(3)
Tips for Quality Read-Aloud
41(1)
Teaching through Reading Aloud
42(1)
Planning a Mediated Read-Aloud in Narrative and Information Texts
42(1)
Sample Mediated Read-Aloud in Narrative Text---A Chair for My Mother
43(6)
Vera B. Williams
Sample Mediated Read-Aloud in Information Text---Trains
49(4)
Gail Gibbons
Rereading and Revisiting Texts
53(2)
Retelling: Building Confidence and Ownership of Stories
55(4)
Responding: Developing Personal Perspectives about Literature
59(5)
Assessment: Monitoring Engagement and Understanding during Read-Aloud
64(1)
Respecting Diversity during Read-Aloud
64(2)
Take a Moment to Reflect
66(1)
Your Turn
67(1)
Shared Reading
68(36)
Looking into Classrooms
69(1)
Building a Theory Base
70(13)
Developing Concepts about Print
71(3)
The Potential of Shared Reading Experiences
74(2)
Types of Text for Shared Reading Experiences
76(3)
Selecting Texts for Shared Reading Experiences
79(4)
Take a Moment to Reflect
83(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
84(18)
Sample Shared Reading of a Big Book
84(3)
Planning Shared Reading Experiences
87(1)
Selecting Skills and Strategies
87(1)
Clear Purpose(s) for Instruction
87(1)
Organizing Shared Reading Experiences
88(3)
Extending Shared Reading Experiences
91(3)
Developing Word Knowledge through Shared Reading
94(3)
Integrating Writing with Shared Reading
97(1)
Assessment: Monitoring Development in Shared Reading
98(3)
Respecting Diversity through Shared Reading
101(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
102(1)
Your Turn
103(1)
Shared and Interactive Writing
104(38)
Looking into Classrooms
105(1)
Building a Theory Base
106(10)
What Is Shared Writing?
106(2)
When Does Shared Writing Become Interactive?
108(1)
Why Do Shared/Interactive Writing?
109(1)
Thinking with Written Language
109(3)
How Is Writing Used in Classrooms?
112(2)
Principles of Written Language
114(2)
Take a Moment to Reflect
116(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
117(21)
Possibilities for Shared/Interactive Writing
117(3)
Grouping for the Composing Process
120(2)
Organizing Shared/Interactive Writing Experiences
122(3)
Exploring Composition Processes
125(2)
Possible Forms of Shared/Interactive Writing
127(2)
Additional Ideas for Shared Compositions
129(2)
Extending Interactions with the Original Text
131(2)
Extending Interactions with Duplicated Text
133(2)
Assessment: Monitoring Children's Development in Shared/Interactive Writing
135(1)
Respecting Diversity with Shared/Interactive Writing
136(2)
Take a Moment to Reflect
138(2)
Your Turn
140(2)
Guided and Independent Reading
142(40)
Looking into Classrooms
143(1)
Building a Theory Base
144(9)
What Is Guided Reading?
144(1)
What Is Independent Reading?
145(1)
Selecting Appropriate Texts
145(2)
Matching Children and Texts
147(3)
The Need for Flexible Grouping
150(1)
Developing Strategic Readers
151(2)
Moving toward Independence
153(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
153(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
154(26)
Engaging Children in Guided Reading Experiences
155(10)
Providing an Environment for Independent Reading
165(5)
Assessment: Monitoring Growth in Guided and Independent Reading
170(8)
Respecting Diversity through Guided and Independent Reading
178(2)
Take a Moment to Reflect
180(1)
Your Turn
181(1)
Guided and Independent Writing
182(50)
Looking into Classrooms
183(1)
Building a Theory Base
184(5)
Writing---Guiding Children's Journey in Thinking
184(4)
Moving toward Independence as Writers
188(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
189(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
190(40)
Guiding Writing in a Writer's Workshop?
190(10)
Functional Writing Experiences
200(8)
Trying on Different Forms of Writing
208(9)
Independent Writing in Activity Centers
217(1)
Extending Writing through Bookmaking
218(2)
Helping Children Develop Legible Handwriting
220(2)
Assessment: Monitoring Children's Development as Writers
222(7)
Respecting Diversity in Writing Development
229(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
230(1)
Your Turn
231(1)
Literature Study
232(48)
Looking into Classrooms
233(1)
Building a Theory Base
234(6)
Why Study Literature?
234(1)
Components of Literature Study
235(1)
Organizing Literature Study
236(2)
Focusing Literature Study
238(1)
Learning to Discuss Books
239(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
240(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
240(37)
Whole-Class Literature Study
241(2)
Whole-Class Chapter Book Study
243(4)
Small-Group Literature Study
247(7)
Independent Literature Study
254(6)
Supporting Skill and Strategy Development in Literature Study
260(5)
Extending Children's Engagement with Literature
265(4)
Integrating Literature Study: One-Week Literature Units
269(1)
Integrating Literature Study: Extended Units
270(4)
Assessment: Monitoring Children's Growth during Literature Study
274(1)
Respecting Diversity during Literature Study
275(2)
Take a Moment to Reflect
277(1)
Your Turn
278(2)
Word Study I: Developing Phonological Awareness
280(42)
Looking into Classrooms
281(1)
Building a Theory Base
282(14)
What Is Word Study?
282(1)
Guiding Principles for Word Study
283(1)
Overview of Word Knowledge and Language Cues
283(2)
Knowledge of Words in the Emergent Stage
285(3)
Developing Phonological Awareness
288(4)
Learning about Letters of the Alphabet
292(4)
Writing Alphabet Letters
296(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
296(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
297(23)
Instructional Focus during the Emergent Stage
297(1)
Using Music to Focus on Sounds
298(3)
Games
301(1)
Sorting Activities
302(4)
Using Sound Boxes
306(3)
Using Environmental Print to Focus on Letters and Sounds
309(1)
Using Children's Literature to Focus on Sounds and Letters
309(3)
Word Study in Shared and Guided Reading
312(1)
Word Study in Shared/Interactive Writing
313(1)
Encouraging Self-Monitoring Strategies
314(1)
Assessment: Monitoring Development in the Emergent Stage
315(2)
Respecting Diversity in Development of Word Knowledge
317(3)
Take a Moment to Reflect
320(1)
Your Turn
321(1)
Word Study II: Developing a Strong Phonics Base
322(42)
Looking into Classrooms
323(1)
Building a Theory Base
324(5)
Children's Knowledge of Words in the Developing Stage
324(3)
Guiding Principles for Phonics Instruction
327(2)
Take a Moment to Reflect
329(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
329(29)
Instruction in the Developing Stage
329(1)
Selecting Words for Study
330(1)
Whole-Class Word Study: Building Words
331(3)
Small-Group Word Study: Sorting, Building, and Hunting Words
334(8)
Word Study Notebooks
342(1)
Possible Sequences for Studying Phonics Patterns
343(9)
Self-Monitoring Strategies in the Developing Stage
352(1)
Sinking into Silent Reading
352(1)
Assessment: Monitoring Growth in Word Knowledge
353(5)
Take a Moment to Reflect
358(5)
Your Turn
363(1)
Word Study III: Integrating Phonics and Structure
364(65)
Looking into Classrooms
365(1)
Building a Theory Base
366(5)
Children's Knowledge of Words in the Transitional Stage
366(1)
Introducing Structural Units
367(3)
Refining Concepts about Words in Print
370(1)
Guiding Principles for Instruction in Structural Patterns
371(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
371(1)
Putting Theory into Practice
372(24)
Overview of Instruction in the Transitional Stage
372(1)
Whole-Class Word Study: Building Structural Words
373(5)
Small-Group Word Study: Sorting, Building, and Hunting for Words
378(3)
Possible Sequence for Structural Patterns for Developing Readers and Writers
381(7)
Structural Patterns for Transitional Readers and Writers
388(4)
Syllabication---Integrating Structure and Phonics across Syllables
392(3)
Self-Monitoring Strategies in the Transitional Stage
395(1)
Solidifying Silent Reading to Connect with Text
395(1)
Assessment: Monitoring Word Knowledge Development with Multisyllable Words
395(1)
Take a Moment to Reflect
396(2)
Your Turn
398(2)
Part II Making Connections: Linking Children's Learning Experiences within a Balanced Literacy Program
An Integrated Unit Study: Learning about Amphibians in Two Second Grade Classrooms
400(1)
Putting Theory into Practice in Second-Grade Classrooms
400(29)
Setting the Stage
401(1)
Meeting the Teachers
401(1)
Getting Started
402(1)
Making Instructional Decisions
403(4)
Putting the Pieces Together
407(21)
Concluding Thoughts
428(1)
Appendix A -- Handbook of Children's Literature 429(21)
Appendix B -- Sample Word Lists and Word Sorts 450(13)
Appendix C -- Pictures for Sorting Activities 463(32)
References 495(6)
Name Index 501(4)
Subject Index 505

Excerpts

Every child has the right to know firsthand the power and possibility that come from being a literate individual! For over thirty years, I have been a teacher of children and adults, and during that time I have learned that effective teachers have at least two things in common--a commitment that all children can learn and a commitment to providing the assistance necessary for every child to become literate. There is much that we must know about children, language, and literacy if we are to support all children as learners. This book is a beginning! Imagine that we are helping a young child learn to ride a bike. At first we provide a great deal of support, patiently demonstrating the parts of bike riding that the child needs to know and seems ready to learn. Teaching this child to ride requires repetition, redirection, and careful observation of his or her responses. Slowly, as the child demonstrates new levels of skill, we adjust the amount and types of support we provide, until the child is riding without our support. There may be spills along the way, even regressions, but we intervene only as the child demonstrates need because we want the child to become independent. The story about riding a bike could just as easily be a story about helping a child learn to read and write. Young children who learn to read and write early usually do so with the support of a responsive adult--an adult who listens to them, talks with them, reads with them, and writes with them. This is what we want for every child, to be that responsive adult who supports their acquisition of literacy skills and strategies, because our goal for children is independence! To this end, this book is organized around teaching strategies that can help each of us be responsive to the literacy needs of young children. LITERACY FRAMEWORK This second edition ofReaders and Writers in Primary Gradesfocuses on a balanced and integrated approach to literacy, meshing theory and practice in every chapter. The illustration on page vi clearly identifies the components of our literacy framework. Each chapter focuses on one or more components, providing the theory base for the component and illustrations of effective classroom practices with the component. PART I: LITERACY METHODS FOR K-3 CLASSROOMS Chapter 1provides an overview of a balanced and integrated approach to literacy, children's growth as readers and writers in the primary grades, and an examination of our role as responsive adults in the literacy process. Chapter 2introduces the foundation of a balanced literacy framework--reading aloud to children. This component is a powerful tool that is often overlooked for its instructional value. In this chapter we explore ways of engaging children in read-aloud to enhance language development and knowledge of what print has to offer. Chapters 3and4provide an in-depth examination of shared reading and writing experiences. Shared experiences provide excellent opportunities to model reading and writing processes for and with children. When we share the pen, and children write with our support, we provide a truly interactive writing experience in which children model and demonstrate their understandings of print. Chapters 5and6provide an in-depth examination of guided and independent reading and writing. It is through these components that we are able to assess the effectiveness of our instruction. Guided reading and writing provide an intermediate step on the way to independence, with assistance as needed to extend children's learning that began in read-aloud and shared reading and writing. Chapter 7provides background needed to organize activities that extend children's interactions with quality literature through wholeclass, smallgroup, and independent study of books. Literature study is a complement to other forms of r


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