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Reading Diagnosis and Improvement: Assessment and Instruction (with MyEducationLab),9780205498451
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Reading Diagnosis and Improvement: Assessment and Instruction (with MyEducationLab)

by ; ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780205498451

ISBN10:
0205498450
Format:
Package
Pub. Date:
1/1/2011
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $151.06
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Summary

This popular introduction to diagnosing and improving reading instruction is now revised and updated based on the latest assessments and research. It includes the most current and up-to-date research assessment, bibliographic references, internet activities and activities throughout the text. Increased coverage on hot topics such as phonological awareness, reading fluency, and English Language Learners, have been included to expose teachers to these critical terms. All chapters have been substantially revised and four new chapters have been added including assessing and teaching early literacy and using many different kinds of texts to help children overcome reading difficulties. Includes a complete Informal Reading Inventory, making the text even more comprehensive (Appendix A). Also includes early literacy assessment forms and language transfer issues that my impact reading performance (Appendix C). Uses case studies to help students gain insight into a diagnostic reading and improvement program. Weaves its discussions of such topics as authentic assessment, performance-based assessments, and portfolio assessment. Addresses requisite components of a diagnostic-reading and improvement program and how to weave them together. Places an emphasis on multicultural needs. Provides a wealth of practical, hands-on scenarios that put key concepts into action. Includes a running glossary that highlights key terms throughout the text.

Table of Contents

Preface xxi
PART 1 SETTING THE STAGE FOR A DIAGNOSTIC-READING AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
1(104)
Introduction to a Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
3(11)
Scenario: A Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program in Action
4(1)
Chapter Objectives
4(1)
What Is a Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program?
5(1)
What Is Diagnosis?
5(1)
Ten Principles of Diagnosis
6(1)
Defining Reading
6(3)
Reading as a Total Integrative Process
7(2)
Reading Theory and Terminology: A Special Note
9(1)
Other Terminology
10(1)
What Is Developmental Reading?
10(1)
What Is Remedial Reading?
10(1)
What Is Balanced Reading?
11(1)
Scenario: Balanced Reading
11(1)
A Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program: A Point of View
11(1)
Summary
12(1)
Chapter 1 Key Concepts
12(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
12(1)
Internet Activities
13(1)
Selected Bibliography
13(1)
The Teacher's Role in the Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
14(25)
Scenarios: Extremes Don't Work!
15(1)
Chapter Objectives
16(1)
The Teacher in a Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
16(1)
The Teacher as the Key to a Good Reading Program
17(1)
Some Important Characteristics and Practices of Good Reading Teachers
18(1)
Teacher Expectations
19(1)
Teacher Standards
19(1)
Teaching in the Twenty-First Century
20(1)
Scenario of a New Teacher
21(1)
Teacher as Planner
22(2)
Teacher as Explicit Reading Teacher
24(1)
What Is Explicit Instruction?
24(1)
Scenario: A Sample Explicit Reading Lesson
25(1)
Teacher as Organizer and Manager
25(2)
Scenario: Mr. Mills---A Good Classroom Manager
27(2)
Record Keeping
28(1)
Individualized Instruction
29(1)
Teacher-Made (Informal) Programs
29(1)
Commercially Produced or Published Programs
29(1)
Some Common Characteristics of Commercially Produced and Teacher-Made Individualized Programs
29(1)
For Whom Does Individualized Instruction Work?
29(1)
Some Common Sense about Individual Programs
30(1)
Learning Centers
30(2)
Designing a Learning Center
31(1)
Teacher as Self-Evaluator
32(1)
Another Look at Lisa and Rachael---Extremes Don't Work!
33(2)
Teaching: A Point of View
35(1)
Summary
36(1)
Chapter 2 Key Concepts
37(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
37(1)
Internet Activities
38(1)
Selected Bibliography
38(1)
Developing a Knowledge Base About Tests, Measurement, and Evaluation
39(22)
Accountability in the Twenty-First Century
40(1)
Scenario: Ms. Smith Learns about Assessment
41(1)
Chapter Objectives
42(1)
Testing Terminology: Evaluation, Tests, Measurement, and Assessment
43(1)
Criteria for Good Tests
44(3)
Standardized Tests
47(1)
Norm-Referenced Tests
47(1)
Limitations of Norm-Referenced Measures
48(1)
Scenario: James Brown---A Teacher Who Knows the Purpose of Tests
48(1)
Standardized Achievement Survey Test Batteries (Multiple-Subject-Matter Tests) and Standardized Reading Survey Tests (Single-Subject-Matter Tests)
49(6)
Locator Tests
50(1)
Practice Tests
51(1)
Classification of Standardized Tests
51(1)
Selecting a Standardized Test
51(1)
Interpretation of Some Achievement Test Score Terms
52(3)
Criterion-Referenced Tests
55(2)
Limitations of Criterion Referenced Measures
56(1)
Teacher-Made Tests
57(1)
Group and Individual Tests
57(1)
Diagnostic Reading Tests
58(1)
Summary
59(1)
Chapter 3 Key Concepts
59(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
60(1)
Internet Activities
60(1)
Selected Bibliography
60(1)
Factors That Affect Reading Performance
61(27)
Scenario: Angelique and Sara: A Study in Contrast
62(1)
Chapter Objectives
63(1)
Differentiating Between Educational and Noneducational Factors
64(1)
Educational Factors
65(3)
Teaching Methods
65(1)
Instructional Materials
66(1)
The Teacher
66(1)
Instructional Time
67(1)
School Environment
67(1)
Non-Educational Factors
68(16)
Home Environment
68(1)
Dialect and Language Differences
69(2)
Standard English, an Important Factor for School Success and Beyond: A Point of View
71(1)
Intelligence
71(1)
Gender
72(1)
Physical Health
73(1)
Perceptual Factors
74(8)
Emotional Health
82(2)
Scenario: The Profile of a First-Grade Failure
84(2)
Summary
86(1)
Chapter 4 Key Concepts
86(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
86(1)
Internet Activities
87(1)
Selected Bibliography
87(1)
Helping Children Achieve in Reading
88(17)
Introduction
89(1)
Scenario: Mr. Brown---A Teacher Who Cares
89(1)
Chapter Objectives
90(1)
Who Are Good Readers?
90(3)
Characteristics of Good Readers
90(3)
Dyslexia: A Point of View
93(1)
Determing Reading Potential
94(2)
What Is a Diagnostic Pattern?
96(1)
Using Listening Capacity to Estimate Reading Potential
96(2)
Scenario: Who Is Underachieving in Reading?
98(1)
Ages and Stages of Literacy Development
98(1)
English Language Learners
99(3)
Underachieving in School: A Point of View
102(1)
Summary
103(1)
Chapter 5 Key Concepts
103(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
103(1)
Internet Activities
104(1)
Selected Bibliography
104(1)
PART 2 INSTRUMENTS AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS OF READING PERFORMANCE
105(134)
Using Alternative Assessment Techniques Across the Grades
107(33)
Scenario: Teachers Talking
108(1)
Chapter Objectives
109(2)
Alternative, Authentic, and Performance Assessment: What's the Difference?
111(2)
Portfolios and Portfolio Assessment
113(2)
The Uses of Observation
115(1)
Making Observations Objective
115(1)
Anecdotal Records
116(1)
Determining the Information to Be Recorded
116(1)
Scenario: Mr. Jackson Checks and Writes
117(3)
Checklists
120(2)
Group and Individual Checklists
120(2)
Checklists and Rating Scales
122(1)
Other Helpful Alternative Assessment Techniques
122(16)
Informal Student Interviews
125(4)
Interest Inventories
129(1)
Reading Attitude Surveys
130(2)
Projective Techniques
132(5)
Reading Autobiography
137(1)
Summary
138(1)
Chapter 6 Key Concepts
138(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
139(1)
Internet Activities
139(1)
Selected Bibliography
139(1)
Assessing and Teaching Early Literacy
140(49)
Scenario: Helping Children Advance as Language Learners
141(1)
Introduction
141(1)
Chapter Objectives
142(1)
Building an Understanding of Early Literacy
142(1)
Areas of Early Literacy
143(1)
Assessing Early Literacy
143(6)
Pre-Reading Assessment
143(2)
Uses of Group-Administered Standardized Pre-Reading Assessments
145(2)
Suggestions for Choosing and Using Mandated Pre-Reading Tests
147(1)
Current Ways to Assess Early Literacy
148(1)
Understanding, Assessing, and Teaching Concepts
149(12)
What Is a Concept?
149(1)
How Do Concepts Develop?
150(1)
How Does Concept Development Relate to Language and Reading
151(1)
How Can Oral Language Concepts Be Assessed
152(3)
How Can Print Concepts Be Assessed?
155(2)
Teaching Oral Language and Print Concepts
157(4)
Understanding, Assessing, and Teaching Phonological Awareness
161(9)
What Is Phonological Awareness?
161(3)
How Can Phonological Awareness Be Assessed?
164(1)
Teaching Phonological Awareness
164(6)
Understanding, Assessing, and Teaching Letter Identification
170(4)
What Is Letter Identification?
170(1)
How Can Letter Identification Be Assessed?
170(2)
Teaching Letter Identification
172(2)
Understanding, Assessing, and Teaching Writing
174(6)
What Is Writing?
174(2)
What Is Developmental Spelling?
176(2)
How Can Writing Be Assessed?
178(1)
Teaching Writing
178(2)
Undertanding, Assessing, and Teaching Story Sense
180(4)
What Is Story Sense?
180(1)
How Can Story Sense Be Assessed?
180(1)
Teaching Story Sense and Story Comprehension
180(4)
Putting It All Together: Who Is in Most Need of Early Intervention?
184(2)
What Is Early Intervention?
184(1)
Who Is in Most Need of Early Intervention?
184(2)
Summary
186(1)
Chapter 7 Key Concepts
186(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
187(1)
Internet Activities
187(1)
Selected Bibliography
188(1)
Listening in On Students' Oral Reading
189(50)
Scenario: Using Oral Reading to Learn More about Vicki
190(1)
Introduction
191(1)
Chapter Objectives
191(2)
An Overview of the Informal Reading Inventory
193(11)
What Is an Informal Reading Inventory?
193(1)
What Are the Purposes of an Informal Reading Inventory?
193(2)
Determining Reading and Listening Capacity Levels
195(3)
Reporting Students' Reading Levels
198(2)
Code for Marking Oral Reading Errors
200(1)
Scoring Oral Reading Errors
200(3)
Using a Diagnostic Checklist for Oral and Silent Reading
203(1)
Administering and Scoring the IRI
204(9)
Step 1: Establishing Rapport
204(1)
Step 2: The Word Recognition Inventory
204(2)
Step 3: Oral and Silent Reading Passages
206(1)
Step 4: The Listening Capacity Test
207(1)
When Is a Listening Capacity Test Given?
207(6)
Who Should be Given an IRI?
213(4)
IRI Selection Criteria
217(1)
Modified IRI Approaches: A Caution
217(1)
Points of Caution Concerning IRIs
218(4)
Criteria for Estimating Reading Levels
219(1)
How Should Oral Reading Errors Be Scored?
220(1)
Oral and Silent Reading Comprehension
221(1)
An Overview of Miscue Analysis
222(3)
What Is Miscue Analysis and What Is its Purpose?
222(1)
How Can Miscue Analysis Be Used?
222(1)
Modified Miscue Analysis
223(2)
An Overview of the Running Record
225(3)
What Is a Running Record?
225(1)
What Are the Purposes of a Running Record?
225(1)
How Are Running Records and IRIs Similar?
225(2)
How Are Running Records and IRIs Different?
227(1)
Administering a Running Record
228(4)
Scoring a Running Record
232(2)
Interpreting a Running Record
234(2)
Summary
236(1)
Chapter 8 Key Concepts
236(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
236(1)
Internet Activities
237(1)
Selected Bibliography
237(2)
PART 3 THE DIAGNOSTIC-READING AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM IN ACTION
239(290)
Using Texts to Help Children Overcome Reading Difficulties
241(25)
Scenario: Imagining the Best Possible School
242(1)
Chapter Objectives
242(1)
Time Spent Reading
243(1)
Reasons for Using a Variety of Texts in a Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
244(1)
Using Texts
245(16)
Commercial Books
246(4)
Children's Literature
250(9)
Other Texts
259(2)
Computers and Reading in a Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
261(1)
Diagnosis and Reading Improvement in Content Areas: A Point of View
262(1)
Summary
263(1)
Chapter 9 Key Concepts
263(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
264(1)
Internet Activities
264(1)
Selected Bibliography
264(2)
Helping Children Acquire and Apply Phonics Knowledge
266(45)
Scenario: Lack of Phonic Skills
267(1)
Introduction
268(1)
Chapter Objectives
268(1)
The Importance of Decoding in Reading
268(1)
Phonics
269(1)
A Developmental Sequence of Phonics
269(23)
Auditory and Visual Discrimination
270(2)
Consonants
272(6)
Vowel Sounds
278(9)
Phonograms
287(2)
Syllabication---Intermediate Grades
289(2)
Accenting Words
291(1)
Teaching Phonics
292(12)
Guidelines for Exemplary Phonics Instruction
292(1)
Explicit and Implicit Phonics Instruction
293(1)
Seven Teaching Strategies
294(10)
Noting Student Progress
304(4)
Summary
308(1)
Chapter 10 Key Concepts
308(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
308(1)
Internet Activities
309(1)
Selected Bibliography
309(2)
Helping Children Acquire and Apply Vocabulary
311(45)
Scenario: Mr. Jackson and Vocabulary Expansion
312(1)
Chapter Objectives
313(1)
Vocabulary Development
313(4)
Acquiring Vocabulary
313(1)
Vocabulary Consciousness
314(1)
Levels of Knowing a Word
315(1)
Types of Words
316(1)
Sight Vocabulary
317(1)
Defining Word Part Terms
317(1)
Teaching Vocabulary
317(7)
Guidelines for Effective Vocabulary Instruction
319(1)
Teaching Strategies
319(5)
Scenario: Ms. Johnson Uses a Modeling Strategy to Teach a Context Clue
324(25)
Noting Student Progress
349(3)
Summary
352(1)
Chapter 11 Key Concepts
353(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
353(1)
Internet Activities
353(1)
Selected Bibliography
353(3)
Helping Children Comprehend
356(54)
Scenario: Assessing and Teaching Alan
357(1)
Introduction
358(1)
Chapter Objectives
359(1)
Building Background about Comprehension
359(7)
Comprehension
359(1)
Listening Comprehension
359(2)
Reading Comprehension
361(3)
Reading Comprehension Taxonomies
364(2)
Oral Reading and Reading Comprehension
366(2)
Guiding Principles
366(1)
Oral Reading: Its Role in the Reading Lesson
367(1)
Comprehension Skills
368(15)
Main Idea of a Paragraph
368(7)
Finding the Central Idea of a Group of Paragraphs
375(3)
Drawing Inferences
378(5)
Comprehension Strategies
383(1)
Teaching Comprehension
383(14)
The Directed Reading-Thinking Activity
384(7)
Think Aloud
391(1)
Repeated Reading
391(1)
Reciprocal Reading Instruction
392(1)
Literature Webbing
393(1)
Questioning Strategies
394(1)
Question--Answer Relationships (QARs)
395(2)
Noting Student Progress
397(9)
Questioning as a Diagnostic Technique
397(1)
Cloze Procedure
398(4)
Maze Procedure
402(4)
Summary
406(1)
Chapter 12 Key Concepts
407(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
407(1)
Internet Activities
408(1)
Selected Bibliography
408(2)
Learning Strategies and Study Skills in a Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
410(27)
Introduction
411(1)
Chapter Objectives
411(1)
What Are Some Good Study Procedures?
412(1)
Building Good Study Habits
412(1)
How to Study
413(1)
Scenario: Modeling the SQ3R Approach for Fourth Grade Students
414(1)
Activities
415(1)
Knowing Your Textbook
415(2)
Concentration
417(1)
Following Directions
418(2)
Skimming
420(1)
Asking Questions
421(1)
Reading and Writing as Modes of Learning
422(1)
Notetaking for Studying
422(1)
Scenario: Notetaking, Studying, and SQ3R
422(2)
Scenario: Semantic Mapping and Studying
424(1)
Summaries as a Mode of Learning
424(1)
Test Taking
425(2)
The School Library and Library Skills
427(2)
Primary Grades
428(1)
Intermediate and Upper-Elementary Grades
428(1)
Concentration and Studying: A point of View
429(6)
Summary
435(1)
Chapter 13 Key Concepts
435(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
436(1)
Internet Activities
436(1)
Selected Bibliography
436(1)
Teachers and Parents as Partners in the Diagnostic-Reading and Improvement Program
437(17)
Introduction
438(1)
Chapter Objectives
438(1)
Parental Involvement in the Schools
438(2)
Some Possible Causes for a Change in Attitude toward Parental Involvement
439(1)
Emergent Literacy and Parents
440(1)
Research on Parental Involvement in their Children's Education
441(2)
Parental Involvement in School Programs
443(1)
Parental Involvement in Regular School Reading Programs
444(3)
How Successful Are Parental Involvement Programs?
447(1)
Television, Computers, Parents, Children, and Reading
448(3)
Television
448(1)
Computers
449(2)
Parent-Teacher Conferences
451(1)
Summary
451(1)
Chapter 14 Key Concepts
452(1)
Suggestions for Thought Questions and Activities
452(1)
Internet Activities
452(1)
Selected Bibliography
453(1)
Putting it all Together
454(75)
Scenario: Case Report of Child
455(2)
Chapter Objectives
457(1)
Scenario Explanation
457(2)
Five Scenarios
459(3)
Appendices
Appendix A Constructing an Informal Reading Inventory
462(5)
Constructing Your Own Informal Reading Inventory
462(1)
Graded Word Lists
462(1)
Graded Oral and Silent Reading Passages
463(1)
The Comprehension Questions
464(3)
Appendix B Informal Reading Inventory
467(47)
Special Notes
469(45)
Appendix C Teacher's Resource Guide of Language Transfer Issues For English Language Learners
514(15)
Grammar Transfer Issues for Ten Languages
514(10)
Phonics Transfer Issues for Seven Languages
524(3)
Sound-Symbol Transfer (Phonics)
527(2)
Glossary 529(10)
Index 539


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