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Reading And Learning To Read,9780205431540
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Reading And Learning To Read

by ; ; ; ; ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780205431540

ISBN10:
0205431542
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $130.60
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Summary

This pioneering text, Reading and Learning to Read, Sixth Edition, emphasizes comprehensive reading instruction and remains an active learning tool that encourages future teachers to teach reading in ways that are both meaningful and reflective.

The authors of this market-leading text continue to promote a contemporary, comprehensive approach to teaching reading and writing with an emphasis on research-based best practice, integrating technology, and accommodating the needs of diverse and struggling learners. This edition maintains its focus on meeting standards—an increasingly critical topic—in new boxes connecting chapter content with standards and assessment, as well as in a wealth of practical examples and references that exemplify the IRA Standards for Reading Professionals.

TAKE A PEEK INSIDE THE SIXTH EDITION!

  • “Step-by-Step Lessons” provide a range of mini lessons that can be transferred directly to the classroom.
  • What About Standards and Assessment? sections at the ends of Chapters 3 through 15 connect chapter content to the two most important topics in reading instruction today—meeting standards and effectively assessing learning.
  • New chapter order reflects the Reading First provision of No Child Left Behind.
  • New margin icons—ELL Diversity—highlight material particularly relevant to teaching English language learners.

ONE REVIEWER SUMS IT UP!

“I believe it to offer an excellent balance between fundamental concepts guiding reading/language arts instruction and information describing “hands-on” strategies and techniques. The primary strengths of Reading and Learning to Read are the correlations with IRA Standards, the very colorful and appealing photos and figures in the artwork, the ease of reading, the organization of important information [in boxes and figures], and the handy chapter tools [chapter objectives, headings and subheadings, as well as the Teacher Action Research and the Related Websites]. The focus on Internet resources is up-to-date and relevant. In addition, the Appendices offer valuable resource information … What this text offers in the way of content that was deficient in other texts is the multitude of materials on word identification, building word concepts, and phonics instruction.”
Karen Samson, Chicago State University

Table of Contents

Features xvii
Preface xxi
Knowledge and Beliefs About Reading
1(31)
The Importance of Belief Systems
4(7)
Different Beliefs, Different Instructional Decisions
5(3)
Reading Instruction and Teachers' Belief Systems
8(3)
How Teachers Come to Know About Reading and Learning to Read
11(4)
Constructing Personal Knowledge
12(1)
Constructing Practical Knowledge
13(1)
Constructing Professional Knowledge and Expertise
13(2)
Cognitive Insights into Reading and Learning to Read
15(6)
The Alphabetic Principle and Learning to Read
15(2)
Schema Theory and Reading Comprehension
17(1)
Metacognition and Learning
18(3)
Reading from a Language Perspective
21(4)
Psycholinguistics and Reading
22(1)
Sociolinguistics and Reading
23(2)
Models of Reading
25(4)
Bottom-Up Models
26(1)
Top-Down Models
27(1)
Interactive Models
28(1)
What About Struggling Readers and Teachers' Knowledge and Beliefs About Reading?
28(1)
Summary
29(1)
Teacher Action Research
29(1)
Related Web Sites
30(2)
Approaches to Reading Instruction
32(24)
Belief Systems and Approaches to Literacy Instruction
35(5)
Beliefs About Reading Interview
36(4)
Theoretical Orientation to Reading Profile
40(1)
Curriculum Perspectives
40(5)
Bottom-Up Curricula
41(1)
Top-Down Curricula
42(3)
Instructional Approaches
45(8)
The Basal Reading Approach
45(1)
The Language-Experience Approach
46(1)
Integrated Language Arts
46(1)
Literature-Based Instruction
47(1)
Technology-Based Instruction
48(1)
Approaches and Strategies in Comprehensive Instruction
48(5)
What About Struggling Readers and Approaches to Literacy Instruction?
53(1)
Summary
53(1)
Teacher Action Research
54(1)
Related Web Sites
54(2)
Early Literacy: From Birth to School
56(34)
Children's Development in Early Reading and Writing
59(14)
Phases of Literacy Development
60(2)
How Reading Develops
62(4)
How Writing Develops
66(7)
Developmentally Appropriate Practices
73(14)
Creating Literate Environments
74(1)
Designing Literacy Play Centers
75(4)
Exploring Print Through Language Experiences
79(2)
Reading to Children
81(5)
What About Struggling Readers and Early Literacy?
86(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Early Literacy?
86(1)
Summary
87(1)
Teacher Action Research
87(1)
Related Web Sites
88(2)
Inviting Beginners into the Literacy Club
90(40)
Emerging Literacy Programs for Beginners
93(2)
Learning Literacy Through Storybooks
95(10)
Big Books in U.S. Classrooms
97(2)
Computer Software
99(1)
Interactive Reading and Writing
99(6)
Learning About the Relationships Between Speech and Print
105(7)
Understanding the Uses of Written Language
105(4)
Connecting Speech and Print Through Language Experience
109(3)
Learning About Features of Written Language
112(3)
Linguistic Awareness
112(1)
The Concepts About Print Test
113(1)
Observing Children's Emerging Literacy Accomplishments
114(1)
Learning About Letters and Sounds
115(13)
Recognizing Letters
117(2)
Developing Phonemic Awareness
119(7)
What About Struggling Readers and the Literacy Club?
126(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and the Literacy Club?
127(1)
Summary
128(1)
Teacher Action Research
128(1)
Related Web Sites
129(1)
Assessing Reading Performance
130(40)
Toward a Corroborative Framework for Decision Making
133(1)
Trends in Assessment
134(4)
High-Stakes Testing
134(1)
Authentic Assessment
135(3)
Formal Assessment
138(5)
Standardized Tests
138(4)
Criterion-Referenced Tests
142(1)
Informal Assessment
143(13)
Informal Reading Inventories
143(4)
Analyzing Oral Reading Miscues
147(4)
Running Records
151(5)
Portfolio Assessment
156(12)
Essential Elements of Portfolios
157(2)
Implementing Portfolios in the Classroom
159(3)
Kidwatching While Teaching
162(5)
What About Struggling Readers and Assessing Reading Performance?
167(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Reading Performance?
167(1)
Summary
168(1)
Teacher Action Research
168(1)
Related Web Sites
169(1)
Word Identification
170(48)
Defining Word Identification
173(2)
Phases of Development in Children's Ability to Identify Words
175(4)
Approaches and Guidelines for Teaching Phonics
179(8)
Traditional Approaches
180(4)
Contemporary Approaches
184(3)
Strategies for Teaching Phonics
187(16)
Consonant-Based Strategies
188(7)
Analogy-Based Strategies
195(4)
Spelling-Based Strategies
199(4)
Using Meaning and Letter-Sound Information to Identify Words
203(3)
Strategies for Teaching Context
203(3)
Cross-Checking and Self-Monitoring Strategies
206(1)
Rapid Recognition of Words
206(7)
High-Frequency Words
208(3)
Strategies for Teaching Function Words
211(1)
Teaching Key Words
212(1)
Balancing Word Identification Instruction
213(3)
What About Struggling Readers and Word Identification?
214(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Word Identification?
214(2)
Summary
216(1)
Teacher Action Research
216(1)
Related Web Sites
217(1)
Reading Fluency
218(32)
Defining Oral Reading Fluency
220(4)
Immediate Word Identification
221(1)
Automaticity
222(1)
Predictability of Reading Materials
223(1)
Developing Oral Reading Fluency
224(11)
Repeated Readings
224(1)
Paired Repeated Readings
225(3)
Automated Reading
228(2)
Choral Reading
230(2)
Readers' Theater
232(3)
Routines for Fluency Development
235(3)
Monitoring Oral Reading Fluency
238(1)
Developing Silent Reading Fluency
239(8)
Sustained Silent Reading
240(2)
Putting SSR into Action
242(1)
SSR for Beginning Readers and Struggling Readers
242(2)
Parents and SSR
244(1)
Teaching Sustained Silent Reading
244(2)
What About Struggling Readers and Reading Fluency?
246(1)
What About Standards Assessment and Reading Fluency?
246(1)
Summary
247(1)
Teacher Action Research
248(1)
Related Web Sites
248(2)
Vocabulary Knowledge and Concept Development
250(36)
The Relationship Between Vocabulary and Comprehension
254(2)
Experiences, Concepts, and Words
256(4)
Words as Labels for Concepts
257(1)
Words and Concepts: A Closer Look
258(1)
Class, Example, and Attribute Relationships
258(2)
Principles to Guide Vocabulary Instruction
260(5)
Principle 1: Select Words That Children Will Encounter While Reading Literature and Content Material
260(2)
Principle 2: Teach Words in Relation to Other Words
262(1)
Principle 3: Teach Students to Relate Words to Their Background Knowledge
263(1)
Principle 4: Teach Words in Prereading Activities to Activate Knowledge and Use Them in Postreading Discussion, Response, and Retelling
263(1)
Principle 5: Teach Words Systematically and in Depth
264(1)
Principle 6: Awaken Interest in and Enthusiasm for Words
265(1)
Best Practice: Strategies for Vocabulary and Concept Development
265(18)
Relating Experiences to Vocabulary Learning
265(2)
Using Context for Vocabulary Growth
267(1)
Developing Word Meanings
267(2)
Classifying and Categorizing Words
269(8)
Developing Word Meanings Through Stories and Writing
277(3)
Developing Independence in Vocabulary Learning
280(2)
What About Struggling Readers and Vocabulary Knowledge?
282(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Vocabulary Knowledge?
283(1)
Summary
283(1)
Teacher Action Research
284(1)
Related Web Sites
284(2)
Reading Comprehension
286(40)
Scaffolding the Development and Use of Comprehension Strategies
289(12)
Active Comprehension
289(3)
Reciprocal Questioning (ReQuest)
292(1)
Question--Answer Relationships (QARs)
293(1)
Questioning the Author (QtA)
294(3)
Reciprocal Teaching
297(3)
Think-Alouds
300(1)
Developing Readers' Awareness of Story Structure
301(11)
Elements in a Story
302(3)
Mapping a Story for Instructional Purposes
305(1)
Building a Schema for Stories
306(6)
Guiding Interactions Between Reader and Text
312(8)
Directed Reading--Thinking Activity
312(2)
KWL (What Do You Know? What Do You Want to Find Out? What Did You Learn?)
314(2)
Discussion Webs
316(2)
Story Impressions
318(2)
Reading Comprehension and the Web
320(3)
What About Struggling Readers and Reading Comprehension?
321(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Reading Comprehension?
322(1)
Summary
323(1)
Teacher Action Research
323(1)
Related Web Sites
324(2)
Meeting the Literacy Needs of Diverse Learners
326(38)
The Complexity of Diversity in Literacy Classrooms
330(1)
Linguistic Diversity in Literacy Classrooms
330(11)
Instructional Beliefs About Linguistic Diversity
332(1)
Instructional Principles for Students Speaking Diverse Languages and Dialects
333(2)
Instructional Strategies for Students Speaking Diverse Languages
335(5)
Dialects and Reading Strategies
340(1)
Cultural Diversity in Literacy Classrooms
341(9)
Instructional Beliefs About Cultural Diversity
342(1)
Instructional Principles for Students from Diverse Cultures
343(1)
Instructional Strategies for Culturally Diverse Students
343(7)
Academic and Cognitive Diversity in Literacy Classrooms
350(11)
Instructional Beliefs About Academic and Cognitive Diversity
351(2)
Instructional Principles for Academic and Cognitive Diversity
353(1)
Instructional Strategies for Students with Diverse Academic and Cognitive Abilities
354(4)
Instructional Programs for Students with Diverse Academic and Cognitive Abilities
358(2)
What About Struggling Readers and Their Diverse Academic and Cognitive Needs?
360(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Diversity?
361(1)
Summary
361(1)
Teacher Action Research
362(1)
Related Web Sites
363(1)
Reading-Writing Connections
364(40)
Relationships Between Reading and Writing
366(3)
Creating Environments for Reading and Writing
369(2)
Connecting Reading and Writing
371(12)
Using Journals (and E-Mail Correspondence) for Written Conversation
373(4)
Using Journals to Explore Texts
377(6)
Establishing a Predictable Structure for Writing
383(12)
Organizing the Writing Workshop
384(1)
Guiding Writing (and Observing Reading)
385(10)
Reading-Writing-Technology Connections
395(4)
Word Processing
395(2)
Desktop Publishing and Multimedia Authoring
397(1)
What About Struggling Readers and Reading-Writing Connections?
398(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Reading--Writing Connections?
399(1)
Summary
399(1)
Teacher Action Research
400(2)
Related Web Sites
402(2)
Bringing Children and Literature Together
404(36)
Supporting a Community of Readers
407(2)
Surrounding Children with Literature
409(13)
Selecting a Classroom Collection of Books
410(6)
Listening to Literature
416(3)
Storytelling
419(1)
Helping Children Select Books
420(2)
Organizing for Literature-Based Instruction
422(8)
Core Books
422(2)
Literature Units
424(1)
Reading Workshops
424(1)
Literature Circles
425(5)
Encouraging Responses to Literature
430(7)
Sparking Discussion with Book Talks
431(1)
Engaging in Free Response
432(1)
Exploring Response Options in Literature Journals
433(3)
What About Struggling Readers and Literature?
436(1)
What About Standards Assessment and Literature?
437(1)
Summary
437(1)
Teacher Action Research
438(1)
Related Web Sites
439(1)
Basal Readers and Instructional Materials
440(34)
The First Basals
443(11)
Basal Programs Today
443(11)
Characteristics of Basal Readers
454(6)
Appearance
454(1)
Illustrations
454(1)
Stereotyping
455(1)
Language Style
455(1)
Workbooks
456(1)
Lesson Framework
456(4)
Making Instructional Decisions
460(3)
Modifying Lessons
461(2)
Instructional Materials
463(9)
Electronic Materials
464(1)
Beliefs About Reading and Instructional Materials
465(2)
Selecting Reading Materials
467(1)
Evaluating Reading Materials
468(3)
What About Struggling Readers and the Basal Reader?
471(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and the Basal Reader?
471(1)
Summary
472(1)
Teacher Action Research
473(1)
Related Web Sites
473(1)
Making the Transition to Content Area Texts
474(38)
Why Are Content Area Textbooks Difficult?
477(5)
Factors in Judging the Difficulty of Textbooks
477(3)
Readability
480(2)
Using Literature and Nonfiction Trade Books Across the Curriculum
482(11)
Some Uses and Benefits of Literature and Nonfiction Trade Books
482(4)
Planning to Use Literature and Informational Text in Content Area Learning
486(2)
Additional Considerations for Implementing Literature and Informational Text in the Content Areas
488(3)
Learning with Electronic Texts
491(2)
Strategies Before Reading
493(6)
Previewing and Skimming
493(2)
Organizers
495(2)
Anticipation Guides
497(1)
Brainstorming
498(1)
Extending Content Learning Through Reading and Writing
499(10)
Point-of-View Guides
499(2)
Idea Circles
501(2)
I-Charts
503(3)
Internet Inquiry
506(1)
What About Struggling Readers and Content Area Texts?
507(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Content Area Texts?
508(1)
Summary
509(1)
Teacher Action Research
510(1)
Related Web Sites
510(2)
Managing and Organizing an Effective Classroom
512(29)
Improving Instruction
515(5)
Classroom Teachers of Reading
515(3)
Collaborative and Cooperative Learning
518(2)
Individualizing Instruction
520(3)
What Is Individualized Instruction in Reading?
521(1)
Influences of Individualized Instruction
521(2)
Putting It All Together: Organizing a Classroom Community
523(15)
Multiage Classrooms
524(1)
Creating a Physical Environment
525(9)
Technology in the Literate Classroom
534(1)
Technology-Based Instructional Considerations
535(2)
What About Struggling Readers and Managing and Organizing an Effective Classroom?
537(1)
What About Standards, Assessment, and Managing and Organizing an Effective Classroom?
538(1)
Summary
538(1)
Teacher Action Research
539(1)
Related Web Sites
539(2)
Appendix A Beliefs About Reading Interview 541(6)
Appendix B The DeFord Theoretical Orientation to Reading Profile (TORP) 547(4)
Appendix C Reading and Writing Accomplishments of Young Children by Grade Level 551(6)
Appendix D Trade Books That Repeat Phonic Elements 557(4)
Appendix E Annotated Bibliography of Read-Aloud Books for Developing Phonemic Awareness 561(6)
Appendix F Recommended Books for Multicultural Reading Experiences 567(12)
Appendix G International Reading Association Standards for Reading Professionals 579(2)
Glossary 581(8)
References 589(20)
Name Index 609(5)
Subject Index 614


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