9780195151978

Recognition In Mozart's Operas

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780195151978

  • ISBN10:

    0195151976

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2006-04-13
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Summary

Since its beginnings, opera has depended on recognition as a central aspect of both plot and theme. Though a standard feature of opera, recognition--a moment of new awareness that brings about a crucial reversal in the action--has been largely neglected in opera studies. In Recognition inMozart's Operas, musicologist Jessica Waldoff draws on a broad base of critical thought on recognition from Aristotle to Terence Cave to explore the essential role it plays in Mozart's operas. The result is a fresh approach to the familiar question of opera as drama and a persuasive new reading ofMozart's operas.

Author Biography


Jessica Waldoff is an Associate Professor of Music and Chair of the Department of Music at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Table of Contents

Introduction 3(1)
Recognition: "From Ignorance to Knowledge" 4(3)
Recognition as a New Perspective 7(3)
Figaro's "Scar" as the "Signature of a Fiction" 10(7)
CHAPTER 1 Operatic Enlightenment in Die Zauberflöte 17(27)
Enlightenment as Metaphor
17(5)
Tamino's Recognition: "Wann wird das Licht mein Auge finden?"
22(13)
Pamina, Papageno, and the End of the Opera
35(6)
The "Scandal" of Recognition
41(3)
CHAPTER 2 Recognition Scenes in Theory and Practice 44(36)
Recognition in Classical and Contemporary Poetics
46(7)
Recognitions of Identity in Mozart
53(12)
Disguise and Its Discovery
65(3)
The Quest for Self-Discovery
68(7)
What Recognition Brings in the End
75(5)
CHAPTER 3 Reading Opera for the Plot 80(24)
Plot in Contemporary Poetics and Opera
81(7)
Plotting in Le now di Figaro
88(7)
Mozart and the Plot That Is "Well Worked Out"
95(9)
CHAPTER 4 Sentimental Knowledge in La finta giardiniera 104(61)
La "sera" and la " finta" giardiniera
107(12)
Reading Opera "for the Sentiment"
119(10)
Sandrina as "Virtue in Distress"
129(10)
Count Belfiore, Madness, and the Restorative Recognition
139(26)
CHAPTER 5 Recognition Denied in Don Giovanni 165(19)
The Problem of the Ending
166(3)
Dénouement and Lieto Fine
169(3)
Recognition Prepared and Denied
172(9)
"Life without the Don"
181(3)
CHAPTER 6 Sense and Sensibility in Cosi fan tutte 184(40)
Resisting the Ending
185(4)
Reading Cosi "for the Sentiment"
189(9)
The Language of Sentimental Knowledge
198(13)
"Vorrei dir," "Smanie implacabili," and Questions of Parody
211(7)
Positions of Knowledge
218(6)
CHAPTER 7 Fiordiligi: A Woman of Feeling 224(41)
The Ideal of the Phoenix
225(4)
Fiordiligi, Ferrarese, and "Come scoglio"
229(9)
"Per pieta": Recognition Denied
238(12)
The Triumph of Feeling over Constancy
250(15)
CHAPTER 8 The Sense of the Ending in La clemenza di Tito 265(44)
The Language of Clemenza and Pietà
268(5)
The Politics of Tyranny
273(3)
Vitellia's Transformation
276(7)
Sesto's Conflict
283(17)
Tito's Clemency
300(9)
Afterword 309(1)
"I Called Him a Papageno" 309(2)
Beyond Mozart 311(2)
Works Cited 313(12)
Index 325

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