9780582226579

The Reign of King Stephen: 1135-1154

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780582226579

  • ISBN10:

    0582226570

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2000-01-24
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

At last: an authoritative, up to date account of the troubled reign of King Stephen, by a leading scholar of the Anglo-Norman world. David Crouch covers every aspect of the period - the king and the empress, the aristocracy, the Church, government and the nation at large. He also looks at the wider dimensions of the story, in Scotland, Wales, Normandy and elsewhere. The result (weaving its discussions around a vigorous narrative core) is a a work of major scholarship. A must for specialist and amateur medievalists alike.

Author Biography

David Grouch is Professor of History at University College, Scarborough.

Table of Contents

List of Maps and Genealogical Table
ix
Acknowledgements xi
Abbreviations xiii
Introduction: Feudalism, Anarchy, the Baron de Montesquieu and Bishop Stubbs 1(8)
PART ONE: THE CAUSES OF THE CIVIL WAR: STEPHEN AS COUNT AND KING, 1113--1139 9(96)
The Count of Mortain
11(19)
The Anglo-Norman realm
14(3)
Stephen and King Henry of England
17(7)
Count Stephen and the Succession to England
24(6)
Succession
30(20)
December 1135
30(5)
From Westminster to Oxford: Christmas 1135 to Easter 1136
35(7)
The Easter court of March 1136
42(8)
Wales and Normandy
50(22)
Wales and the March
54(5)
Normandy
59(9)
The growth of faction, December 1137
68(4)
The Summer of Rebellions, 1138
72(12)
The lions escape the arena
74(10)
Radicalism and Conspiracy
84(21)
The creation of new earls
84(6)
Bishop Henry of Winchester and the new regime
90(3)
The fall of Roger of Salisbury
93(4)
King Stephen's reputation in 1139
97(8)
PART TWO: THE CIVIL WAR, 1139--1147 105(126)
Civil War in England
107(14)
The formation of the empress's party in England
110(4)
Containment
114(6)
Appendix - Bungay, the Beaumonts and the Bigods
120(1)
The Ideology of Civil War
121(12)
The debate between the parties
121(4)
The ideology of the `tenurial crisis'
125(2)
The ideology of kinship and `patriarchal' politics
127(6)
Lincoln
133(13)
Stalemate and peace talks, 1140
133(2)
Public order and the battle of Lincoln, February 1141
135(8)
Appendix I - The dating of Regesta iii, no. 178
143(1)
Appendix II - Encore le chateau de `Galclint'
144(2)
Lords and Order
146(22)
Kings, aristocracies and order in England and Normandy
147(6)
Honors, affinities and regional power
153(2)
The consequences of political insecurity and the political order
155(5)
Lions and jackals
160(6)
Appendix - The `affinity' in the twelfth century
166(2)
The Failure of the Empress
168(21)
From Lincoln to London
168(11)
The release of King Stephen
179(10)
The Failure of King Stephen
189(24)
The loss of Normandy, 1141--44
190(9)
The recapture of Oxford (December 1142)
199(5)
Neutralism, misjudgement and stalemate (1143)
204(9)
The End of the Civil War
213(18)
Earl Robert and the fight for Gloucester, 1144--47
213(9)
Stephen, his new men and his earls, 1142--47
222(3)
King Stephen and Earl Ranulf of Chester, 1144--47
225(6)
PART THREE: SETTLING THE KINGDOM, 1147--1154 231(62)
War, Peace and the Magnates, 1147--1152
233(22)
The treaties of 1148--49
234(5)
The departure of the empress and the cause of Duke Henry, 1148--50
239(6)
Stephen, Count Eustace and the Church
245(2)
The fight for Normandy, 1150--52
247(6)
Appendix - The Date of the Chester-Leicester Conventio
253(2)
The Solution
255(38)
The campaign of 1153
262(8)
The peace settlement of 1153
270(10)
Duke Henry in Normandy
280(5)
The end of the reign
285(4)
Appendix I - The date of the Worcester campaigns, 1150--51
289(1)
Appendix II - What happened at Siston, 1138--53
290(3)
PART FOUR: THE IMPACT OF STEPHEN'S REIGN 293(50)
The Church
295(25)
Did Stephen have a policy towards the Church?
296(2)
The significance of the Oxford charter of 1136
298(2)
Elections and appointments
300(6)
Church courts
306(2)
Stephen and the papacy
308(3)
Monasticism and society
311(3)
The spirituality of the King and queen
314(6)
The Nation
320(20)
England and its empire
321(4)
Earls and governors
325(2)
Stephen's exchequer
327(2)
The coinage
329(2)
The forest
331(2)
Taxation and tenseries
333(3)
Royal justice
336(4)
Conclusion
340(3)
Select Bibliography 343(11)
Printed primary sources
343(4)
Secondary works
347(7)
Maps 354(2)
Genealogical Table 356(1)
Index 357

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