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Reinforced Concrete Design,9780130924261
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Reinforced Concrete Design

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130924261

ISBN10:
0130924261
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $114.40
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Summary

For sophomore/junior-level courses in Reinforced Concrete Design, Concrete Construction, Structural Analysis and Design, and Structures. Using a straight-forward, step-by-step, problem-solution format-with an abundance of fully-worked sample problems-this text provides an elementary, non-calculus, practical approach to the design and analysis of reinforced concrete structural members. It translates a vast amount of information and data in an integrated source that reflects the latest standards and that provides a basic, workable understanding of the strength and behavior of reinforced concrete members and simple concrete structural systems.

Table of Contents

Materials and Mechanics of Bending
1(21)
Concrete
2(1)
The ACI Building Code
2(1)
Cement and Water
2(1)
Aggregates
3(1)
Concrete in Compression
3(3)
Concrete in Tension
6(1)
Reinforcing Steel
6(4)
Beams: Mechanics of Bending Review
10(12)
References
18(1)
Problems
19(3)
Rectangular Reinforced Concrete Beams and Slabs: Tension Steel Only
22(49)
Introduction
23(1)
Methods of Analysis and Design
24(1)
Behavior Under Load
25(2)
Strength Design Method Assumptions
27(1)
Flexural Strength of Rectangular Beams
28(2)
Equivalent Stress Distribution
30(4)
Balanced, Overreinforced, and Underreinforced Beams
34(1)
Reinforcement Ratio Limitations and Guidelines
35(4)
Strength Requirements
39(2)
Rectangular Beam Analysis for Moment (Tension Reinforcement Only)
41(4)
Summary of Procedure for Rectangular Beam Analysis for φMn (Tension Reinforcement Only)
45(1)
Slabs: Introduction
46(1)
One-Way Slabs: Analysis for Moment
46(4)
Rectangular Beam Design for Moment (Tension Reinforcement Only)
50(8)
Summary of Procedure for Rectangular Reinforced Concrete Beam Design for Moment (Tension Reinforcement Only)
58(2)
Design of One-Way Slabs for Moment (Tension Reinforcement Only)
60(2)
Summary of Procedure for Design of One-Way Slabs for Moment (to Satisfy ACI Minimum h)
62(1)
Slabs on Ground
63(8)
References
64(1)
Problems
65(6)
Reinforced Concrete Beams: T-Beams and Doubly Reinforced Beams
71(50)
T-Beams: Introduction
72(2)
T-Beam Analysis
74(5)
Development of T-Beam As, max
79(3)
Analysis of Beams Having Irregular Cross Sections
82(2)
T-Beam Design (for Moment)
84(6)
Summary of Procedure for Analysis of T-Beams (for Moment)
90(2)
Summary of Procedure for Design of T-Beams (for Moment)
92(1)
Doubly Reinforced Beams: Introduction
93(1)
Doubly Reinforced Beam Analysis for Moment (Condition I)
94(5)
Doubly Reinforced Beam Analysis for Moment (Condition II)
99(5)
Summary of Procedure for Analysis of Doubly Reinforced Beams (for Moment)
104(2)
Doubly Reinforced Beam Design for Moment
106(4)
Summary of Procedure for Design of Do Reinforced Beams (for Moment)
110(2)
Additional Code Requirements for Doubly Reinforced Beams
112(9)
Problems
112(9)
Shear in Beams
121(26)
Introduction
121(3)
Shear Reinforcement Design Requirements
124(4)
Shear Analysis Procedure
128(2)
Stirrup Design Procedure
130(11)
Torsion: Introduction
141(1)
Design of Torsion Reinforcement
142(5)
Problems
143(4)
Development, Splices, and Simple-Span Bar Cutoffs
147(38)
Development Length: Introduction
148(1)
Development Length: Tension Bars
149(9)
Development Length: Compression Bars
158(1)
Development Length: Standard Hooks in Tension
158(5)
Development of Web Reinforcement
163(2)
Splices
165(1)
Tension Splices
166(1)
Compression Splices
167(1)
Simple-Span Bar Cutoffs and Bends
167(9)
Code Requirements for Development of Positive Moment Steel at Simple Supports
176(9)
Problems
179(6)
Continuous Construction Design Considerations
185(28)
Introduction
185(2)
Continuous-Span Bar Cutoffs
187(3)
Design of Continuous Floor Systems
190(23)
Problems
211(2)
Serviceability
213(18)
Introduction
213(1)
Deflections
214(1)
Calculation of Icr
215(5)
Immediate Deflection
220(1)
Long-Term Deflection
221(4)
Deflections for Continuous Spans
225(1)
Crack Control
226(5)
Problems
228(3)
Walls
231(47)
Introduction
231(3)
Lateral Forces on Retaining Walls
234(4)
Design of Reinforced Concrete Cantilever Retaining Walls
238(32)
Design Considerations for Bearing Walls
270(4)
Design Considerations for Basement Walls
274(4)
Problems
275(3)
Columns
278(33)
Introduction
279(1)
Strength of Reinforced Concrete Columns: Small Eccentricity
280(3)
Code Requirements Concerning Column Details
283(2)
Analysis of Short Columns: Small Eccentricity
285(3)
Design of Short Columns: Small Eccentricity
288(4)
Summary of Procedure for Analysis and Design of Short Columns with Small Eccentricities
292(1)
The Load-Moment Relationship
292(1)
Columns Subjected to Axial Load at Large Eccentricity
293(1)
Analysis of Short Columns: Large Eccentricity
294(8)
φ Factor Considerations
302(1)
The Slender Column
303(8)
References
307(1)
Problems
308(3)
Footings
311(45)
Introduction
312(1)
Wall Footings
312(11)
Wall Footings Under Light Loads
323(1)
Individual Reinforced Concrete Footings for Columns
324(4)
Square Reinforced Concrete Footings
328(8)
Rectangular Reinforced Concrete Footings
336(10)
Eccentrically Loaded Footings
346(1)
Combined Footings
346(4)
Cantilever or Strap Footings
350(6)
Problems
354(2)
Prestressed Concrete Fundamentals
356(30)
Introduction
357(1)
Design Approach and Basic Concepts
357(3)
Stress Patterns in Prestressed Concrete Beams
360(2)
Prestressed Concrete Materials
362(1)
Analysis of Rectangular Prestressed Concrete Beams
363(5)
Alternative Methods of Elastic Analysis: Internal Couple Method
368(3)
Alternative Methods of Elastic Analysis: Load Balancing Method
371(8)
Flexural Strength Analysis
379(3)
Notes on Prestressed Concrete Design
382(4)
References
382(1)
Problems
383(3)
Concrete Formwork
386(52)
Introduction
387(1)
Formwork Requirements
387(1)
Formwork Materials and Accessories
388(5)
Loads and Pressures on Forms
393(2)
The Design Approach
395(8)
Design of Formwork for Slabs
403(11)
Design of Formwork for Beams
414(9)
Wall Form Design
423(7)
Forms for Columns
430(8)
References
435(1)
Problems
435(3)
Detailing Reinforced Concrete Structures
438(20)
Introduction
439(1)
Placing Drawings
440(3)
Marking Systems and Bar Marks
443(2)
Schedules
445(1)
Fabricating Standards
446(1)
Bar Lists
446(6)
Extras
452(1)
Bar Supports and Bar Placement
452(1)
Computer Detailing
453(5)
References
456(2)
APPENDIX A TABLES 458(16)
APPENDIX B SUPPLEMENTARY AIDS AND GUIDELINES 474(8)
B-1 Accuracy for Computations for Reinforced Concrete
474(2)
B-2 As, max for Doubly Reinforced Beams
476(2)
B-3 Flow Diagrams
478(4)
APPENDIX C METRICATION 482(17)
C-1 The International System of Units (SI)
482(3)
C-2 SI Style and Usage
485(3)
C-3 Conversion Factors
488(11)
References
498(1)
Answers to Selected Problems 499(3)
Index 502

Excerpts

The primary objective ofReinforced Concrete Design,Fifth Edition, remains the same as that of previous editions, to furnish the reader with a basic understanding of the strength and behavior of reinforced concrete members and simple reinforced concrete structural systems. With relevant reinforced concrete research and literature continuing to become available at a rapid rate, it is the intent of this book to translate this vast amount of information and data into an integrated source that reflects the latest information available. It is not intended to be a comprehensive theoretical treatise on the subject, because we believe that such a document could easily obscure the fundamentals that we strive to emphasize in the engineering technology programs. In addition, we believe that adequate comprehensive books on reinforced concrete design do exist for those who seek the theoretical background, the research studies, and more rigorous applications. This fifth edition has been prepared with the primary objective of updating its contents to conform to the latestBuilding Code Requirements for Structural Concrete(ACI 318-99) of the American Concrete Institute. Since the ACI Code serves as the design standard in the United States, it is strongly recommended that the code be used as a companion publication to this book. In addition to the necessary changes to conform to the new code, some sections have been edited, some new homework problems (including some spreadsheet problems) have been added, and others have been edited. Answers to selected problems are furnished at the back of the text. Throughout the five editions, the text content has remained primarily an elementary, noncalculus, practical approach to the design. and analysis of reinforced concrete structural members using numerous examples and a step-by-step solution format. In addition, there are chapters that provide a conceptual approach to such topics as prestressed concrete and detailing of reinforced concrete structures. The metric system (SI), the use of which is gradually gaining momentum in the reinforced concrete design and construction field in the United States, is introduced in a separate appendix with several example problems. Form design is an important consideration in most structural design problems involving concrete members, and Chapter 12 illustrates a procedure for the design of job-built forms for slabs, beams, and columns. Appropriate tables are included that will expedite the design process. This book has been thoroughly tested over the years in our engineering technology programs and should serve as a valuable design guide and resource for technologists, technicians, and engineering and architectural students. In addition, it will aid engineers and architects preparing for state licensing examinations for professional registration. Thanks are extended to the reviewers of this edition: Dr. Gabriel D. Alungbe, PE, Central Connecticut State University, and E. Terence Foster, Ph.D., PE, University of Nebraska. As in the past, appreciation is extended to students, past and present, and colleagues who with their constructive comments, criticisms, and enthusiasm have provided input and encouragement for this edition. George F. Limbrunner


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