CART

(0) items

Research Design in Counseling,9780534345174
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Research Design in Counseling

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780534345174

ISBN10:
0534345174
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/9/1998
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole

Related Products


  • Research Design In Counseling
    Research Design In Counseling
  • Research Design in Counseling, 3rd Edition
    Research Design in Counseling, 3rd Edition





Summary

Quell any fears you may have about science and research design with this clear introduction to the basics! With enlightening examples and illustrations drawn from the counseling literature, RESEARCH DESIGN IN COUNSELING fully addresses the most common issues that counseling researchers encounter. The authors' accessible approach provides you with an understanding of the various types of research, including both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Filled with helpful examples that draw from a broad variety of research designs, this book provides the fundamentals of conducting research while providing clear instruction on writing and publishing the research report.

Table of Contents

PART ONE PHILOSOPHICAL, ETHICAL, AND TRAINING ISSUES 1(118)
CHAPTER 1 SCIENCE AND TRAINING IN COUNSELING
3(28)
The Role of Science in Counseling
4(9)
Science as a Way of Knowing
5(1)
Science as Applied to Human Behavior
6(2)
A Philosophy of Science for the Counseling Profession
8(5)
The Importance of a Scientific Approach
13(1)
Training in Counseling
13(15)
The Scientist-Practitioner Model
14(4)
The Need to Broaden Scientific Training
18(4)
Students' Typical Reactions to Scientific Training
22(6)
Summary and Conclusions
28(3)
CHAPTER 2 IDENTIFYING AND OPERATIONALIZING RESEARCH TOPICS
31(12)
Identifying Research Topics
31(4)
Specifying Research Questions and Hypotheses
35(4)
Formulating Operational Definitions
39(1)
Identifying Research Variables
40(1)
Collecting and Analyzing Data
41(1)
Summary and Conclusions
41(2)
CHAPTER 3 CHOOSING RESEARCH DESIGNS
43(13)
Scientific Inquiry and Research Design
43(1)
What Is the Best Design?
44(1)
A Classification of Research Designs
45(6)
Descriptive Laboratory Studies
47(1)
Descriptive Field Studies
48(2)
Experimental Laboratory Studies
50(1)
Experimental Field Studies
51(1)
On Choosing a Research Design
51(3)
Summary and Conclusions
54(2)
CHAPTER 4 VALIDITY ISSUES IN RESEARCH DESIGN
56(23)
Four Types of Validity and the Threats to Each
56(21)
Overview of the Types of Validity
57(2)
Threats to Statistical Conclusion Validity
59(4)
Threats to Internal Validity
63(8)
Threats to Construct Validity of Putative Causes and Effects
71(4)
Threats to External Validity
75(2)
Summary and Conclusions
77(2)
CHAPTER 5 ETHICAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING RESEARCH
79(40)
Fundamental Ethical Principles
80(3)
Nonmaleficence
80(1)
Beneficence
81(1)
Autonomy
82(1)
Justice
82(1)
Fidelity
82(1)
Virtue Ethics
83(1)
Ethical Issues Related to Scholarly Work
83(10)
Execution of the Research Study
84(1)
Reporting the Results
85(2)
Duplicate and Piecemeal Publication
87(1)
Publication Credit
88(4)
Plagiarism
92(1)
Ethical Issues Related to Participants
93(14)
Risks and Benefits
95(3)
Consent
98(3)
Deception and Debriefing
101(2)
Confidentiality and Privacy
103(3)
Treatment Issues
106(1)
Responding to Ethical Dilemmas
107(1)
Summary and Conclusions
108(11)
PART TWO MAJOR RESEARCH DESINGS 119(148)
CHAPTER 6 BETWEEN-GROUPS AND WITHIN-SUBJECTS DESIGNS
121(30)
Between-Groups Designs
122(20)
Historical Perspective
122(1)
Three Common Experimental Between-Groups Designs
123(10)
Use of Control Groups
133(2)
Factorial Designs
135(3)
Participant Assignment
138(2)
Dependent Samples Designs
140(2)
Within-Subjects Designs
142(6)
Crossover Designs
143(1)
Latin Square Designs
144(1)
Strengths and Limitations
145(3)
Summary and Conclusions
148(3)
CHAPTER 7 QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL AND TIME-SERIES DESIGNS
151(22)
Quasi-Experimental Designs
152(12)
Historical Perspective and Overview
154(1)
Nonequivalent-Groups Designs
155(6)
Cohort Designs
161(3)
Time-Series Designs
164(7)
Simple Interrupted Time Series
165(4)
Analysis of Concomitance in Time Series
169(2)
Summary and Conclusions
171(2)
CHAPTER 8 SINGLE-SUBJECT DESIGNS
173(27)
A Historical Perspective of Single-Subject Designs
175(1)
Single-Case Quantitative Designs
176(4)
Single-Case Experimental Designs
180(10)
Common Features of Single-Case Experimental Designs
180(1)
AB Time-Series Designs
181(7)
Multiple-Baseline Designs
188(2)
Advantages and Limitations of Single-Subject Designs
190(7)
Advantages
190(6)
Limitations
196(1)
Summary and Conclusions
197(3)
CHAPTER 9 QUANTITATIVE DESCRIPTIVE DESIGNS
200(35)
Survey or Epidemiological Research Designs
201(7)
Design Issues in Surveys
204(2)
An Example of Survey Research
206(2)
Classification or Data Reduction Research Designs
208(12)
Factor Analysis
209(8)
Cluster Analysis
217(3)
Passive Research Designs
220(12)
Ex Post Facto Designs
222(3)
Multiple Regression
225(7)
Summary and Conclusions
232(3)
CHAPTER 10 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
235(32)
Worldviews of Research
236(5)
Positivism
236(1)
Postpositivism
237(1)
Constructivism
238(2)
Critical Theory
240(1)
Aspects of Qualitative Research
241(12)
Reality
241(2)
Representation of the World
243(1)
Domain Knowledge and Theory
244(1)
Intellectual Bases
245(1)
Level of Inquiry
245(1)
Role of the Investigator
246(1)
Role of Subjects/Participants
247(1)
Generalizability
247(1)
Bias
248(1)
Validity
249(2)
Reliability
251(1)
Product
251(1)
Audience
251(1)
Control
252(1)
Goals of Study
252(1)
Researcher's Voice
253(1)
Power Structure
253(1)
Primary Tasks in Qualitative Research
253(13)
Gathering Data
254(9)
Analyzing and Presenting Data
263(3)
Summary and Conclusions
266(1)
PART THREE METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES 267(248)
CHAPTER 11 DESIGNING AND EVALUATING THE INDEPENDENT VARIABLE
269(13)
Operationalizing the Independent Variable
270(4)
Determining Conditions
270(1)
Adequately Reflecting the Construcrs of Interest
271(1)
Limiting Differences Between Conditions
271(2)
Establishing Salience of Differences in Conditions
273(1)
Manipulation Checks
274(1)
Interpreting Results
275(3)
Statistically Significant Results
276(1)
Statistically Nonsignificant Results
277(1)
Status Variables
278(2)
Summary and Conclusions
280(2)
CHAPTER 12 DESIGNING OR CHOOSING THE DEPENDENT VARIABLE
282(35)
Operationalizing the Dependent Variable
283(20)
Psychometric Issues
283(19)
Reactivity
302(1)
Procedural Considerations
302(1)
Methods of Data Collection
303(12)
Self-Reports
303(6)
Ratings of Other Persons and Events
309(1)
Behavioral Observations
310(1)
Physiological Indexes
311(1)
Interviews
312(1)
Projective Techniques
313(1)
Unobtrusive Measures
314(1)
Summary and Conclusions
315(2)
CHAPTER 13 POPULATIONS ISSUES
317(22)
Sampling Theory
318(4)
Practical Considerations in Selecting Participants
322(8)
Defining the Target Population
322(1)
Creating a Participant Pool
323(1)
Selecting Participants
324(1)
Establishing Validity in the Absence of Random Selection
324(2)
Determining the Number of Participants
326(4)
External Validity and Population Issues
330(7)
Use of Factorial Designs to Study External Validity
330(4)
Considerations in Examining Generalizability Across Populations
334(3)
Summary and Conclusions
337(2)
CHAPTER 14 INVESTIGATOR, EXPERIENTER, AND PARTICIPANT BIAS
339(18)
Investigator and Experimenter Bias
340(9)
Experimenter Attributes
341(2)
Investigator And Experimenter Expectancies
343(2)
Experimental Procedures
345(4)
Participant Bias
349(7)
Demand Characteristics
350(1)
Participant Characteristics
351(2)
Participants' Ability to Report Their Experiences
353(1)
Strategies for Reducing Participant Bias
354(2)
Summary and Conclusions
356(1)
CHAPTER 15 ANALOGUE RESEARCH
357(15)
Historical Overview
358(2)
Advantages of Analogue Research
360(1)
Disadvantages of Analogue Research
361(1)
Variables to Consider in Evaluating the Generalizability of Analogue Studies
361(7)
Client Variables
364(1)
Counselor Variables
365(2)
Counseling Process and Setting
367(1)
Evaluating Analogue Utility Within an Existing Knowledge Base
368(2)
Summary and Conclusions
370(2)
CHAPTER 16 OUTCOME RESEARCH: STRATEGIES AND METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
372(27)
Early Outcome Research in Counseling
373(1)
Strategies for Conducting Outcome Research
374(12)
The Treatment Package Strategy
375(1)
The Dismantling Strategy
376(2)
The Constructive Strategy
378(3)
The Parametric Strategy
381(1)
The Comparative Outcome Strategy
382(3)
The Client and Therapist Variation Strategy
385(1)
Methodological Issues in Conducting Outcome Research
386(11)
Selecting the Apropriate Comparison Group
386(2)
Assessing Treatment Integrity: Adherence, Competence, and Differenctiation
388(3)
Measuring Change
391(6)
Empirically Validated Treatments
397(1)
Summary and Conclusions
398(1)
CHAPTER 17 DESIGN ISSUSE RELATED TO COUNSELING PROCESS RESEARCH
399(89)
Defining Counseling Process Research
400(4)
Early Process Research
401(2)
Some Current Research Findings
403(1)
Design Issues in Process Research
404(12)
Getting Started: What to Study and in What Context?
405(1)
What to Measure?
406(1)
Whose Prespective?
407(1)
How Much to Measure?
408(1)
How to Code and Analyze the Process Data?
409(7)
Representative Examples of Instruments Used in Counseling Process Research
416(24)
Ancillary Behaviors, Micro Level
418(2)
Ancillary Behaviors, Global Level
420(1)
Verbal Behaviors, Micro Level
421(1)
Verbal Behaviors, Global Level
422(1)
Covert Behaviors, Micro Level
423(2)
Covert Behaviors, Global Level
425(1)
Content, Micro Level
426(1)
Content, Global Level
426(1)
Strategies, Micro Level
427(3)
Strategies, Global Level
430(1)
Interpersonal Manner, Micor Level
431(1)
Interpersonal Manner, Global Level
431(2)
Therapeutic Relationship, Micro Level
433(1)
Therapeutic Relationship, Global Level
433(2)
Quality, Micro Level
435(2)
Quality, Global Level
437(2)
Two Postscripts
439(1)
Summary and Conclusions
440(48)
CHAPTER 18 PROGRAM EVALUATION
488(27)
Matrese Benkofske
Clyde C. Heppner
Program Evaluation Described
488(3)
Phases of Program Evaluation
491(21)
Setting the Evaluation's Boundaries
492(3)
Selecting Appropriate Evaluation Methods
495(10)
Collecting and Analyzing Information
505(3)
Reporting the Evaluation's Findings
508(4)
Summary and Conclusions
512(3)
PART FOUR PROFESSIONAL ISSUES 515(29)
CHAPTER 19 WRITING AND RESEARCH TRAINING
517(27)
Sections of a Research Report
518(9)
Title
519(1)
Abstract
520(1)
Introduction
520(2)
Method
522(3)
Results
525(1)
Discussion (or Conclusions)
526(1)
General Principles for Writing Research Reports
527(3)
Be Informative
527(1)
Be Forthright
527(1)
Do Not Overstate or Exaggerate
528(1)
Be Logical and Organized
529(1)
Have Some Style
529(1)
Write and Rewrite
530(1)
If All Else Fails, Just Write!
530(1)
Research Training
530(12)
A Structural Equation Model for Research Training
531(11)
A Final Comment on Research Training
542(1)
Summary and Conclusions
542(2)
APPENDIX A Ethical Standards of the American Counseling Association 544(10)
APPENDIX B Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct 554(21)
References 575(41)
Author Index 616(10)
Subject Index 626


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...