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Resource Guide for Elementary School Teaching, A,9780131196124
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Resource Guide for Elementary School Teaching, A

by ; ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131196124

ISBN10:
013119612X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $106.60
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Summary

A Resource Guide for Elementary School Teachingis a practical, comprehensive, and concise methods book designed to engage readers in "hands-on" and "minds-on" learning about effective teaching. Designed to engage readers in both hands-on and reflective learning, each chapter contains an abundance of application exercises on perforated pages that provide opportunities to practice what you are learning and to reflect on the progress you are making toward your professional competence. Its user-friendly format presents teachers with a valuable resource by offering strategies that can be easily applied in the elementary classroom. Inservice Elementary Teachers (K-5).

Table of Contents

PART I ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING AND LEARNING
1(100)
What Do I Need to Know About Today's Elementary Schools?
2(26)
Looking at Teachers
3(1)
Chapter Objectives
3(1)
The Elementary School: Getting to Know It
4(4)
Primary and Elemiddle Schools
4(1)
Magnet Schools and Charter Schools
4(1)
Orientation Meetings for Teachers
4(1)
School Schedules
4(2)
Subjects of the Curriculum
6(1)
Team Teaching
6(1)
Looping
6(2)
The Fundamental Characteristic of Exemplary Elementary School Education
8(7)
Teachers and Commitment
8(1)
Teachers and Reflective Decision Making
8(1)
The Effective Principal
9(1)
Commitment to Helping All Children Succeed in School
9(2)
Application Exercise 1.1: Reflecting on My Own Elementary School Experiences
11(2)
Application Exercise 1.2: Dialogue with a Teacher Candidate: ``Sole'' Mates
13(2)
Ways to Connect with Home, Community, and School
15(1)
Home and School Connections
15(1)
Service Learning and Place-Based Education
16(1)
Telecommunications Networks
16(1)
Professional Resources File
16(1)
The Emergent Overall Picture
16(6)
Key Trends and Practices Today
18(1)
No Child Left Behind Act
18(1)
Curriculum Standards and High-Stakes Testing
19(2)
Problems and Issues That Trouble the Nation's Schools
21(1)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
21(1)
Summary
22(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
23(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
23(1)
For Your Discussion
23(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
24(1)
For Further Reading
24(1)
Notes
24(4)
The Nature of the Challenge: What Do I Need to Know About Elementary Learners?
28(20)
Looking at Teachers
29(1)
Chapter Objectives
29(1)
Dimensions of the Challenge
30(1)
The Classroom in a Nation of Diversity
30(1)
Supporting the Challenge: Learning Modalities, Learning Styles, Learning Capacities, and Implications for Teaching
31(3)
Learning Modalities
31(1)
Learning Styles
32(1)
The Three-Phase Learning Cycle
33(1)
Learning Capacities: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences
34(1)
Meeting the Challenge: Recognizing and Providing for Student Differences
34(10)
Instructional Practices That Provide for Student Differences: General Guidelines
35(1)
Developmental Characteristics of Children of Particular Age Groups
36(1)
Application Exercise 2.1: Obtaining Personal Insight Regarding the Age or Grade Level That I Might Prefer to Teach
37(2)
Application Exercise 2.2: Conversation with a Classroom Teacher
39(2)
Recognizing and Working with Students with Special Needs
41(3)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
44(1)
Summary
44(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
44(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
44(1)
For Your Discussion
45(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
45(1)
For Further Reading
45(1)
Notes
46(2)
What Are the Expectations, Responsibilities, and Facilitating Behaviors of a Classroom Teacher?
48(30)
Looking at Teachers
49(1)
Chapter Objectives
49(1)
The Teacher's Professionalism and Commitment
50(9)
Noninstructional Responsibilities
50(1)
Instructional Responsibilities
51(2)
Application Exercise 3.1: Reviewing the Professional Responsibilities of a First-Year Teacher
53(6)
Identifying and Building Your Instructional Competencies
59(1)
Characteristics of the Competent Classroom Teacher: An Annotated Teacher Progress Report Card
59(1)
Teacher Behaviors That Facilitate Student Learning
59(1)
The Teacher as a Reflective Decision Maker
59(8)
Decision-Making Phases of Instruction
63(1)
Reflection, Locus of Control, and Teacher Responsibility
63(2)
Application Exercise 3.2: The Teacher as a Reflective Decision Maker
65(2)
Teaching Style
67(1)
Multilevel Instruction
67(1)
The Theoretical Origins of Teaching Styles and Their Relations to Constructivism
67(8)
Application Exercise 3.3: Using a Questionnaire to Develop a Profile and a Statement About My Own Emerging Teaching Style
69(6)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
75(1)
Summary
75(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
76(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
76(1)
For Your Discussion
76(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
76(1)
For Further Reading
76(1)
Notes
77(1)
What Do I Need to Know to Manage an Effective, Safe, and Supportive Learning Environment?
78(23)
Looking at Teachers
79(1)
Chapter Objectives
80(1)
The Importance of Perceptions
80(1)
Classroom Control: Its Meaning---Past and Present
80(5)
Historical Meaning of Classroom Control
80(1)
Today's Meaning of Classroom Control and the Concept of Classroom Management
81(1)
Classroom Management: Contributions of Some Leading Authorities
81(4)
Developing My Own Effective Approach to Classroom Management
85(1)
Providing a Supportive Learning Environment
85(6)
Consider the Physical Layout
88(1)
Create a Positive Classroom Atmosphere
88(1)
Get to Know the Children as People and Build Intrinsic Motivation for Learning
88(3)
Preparation Provides Confidence and Success
91(1)
Using Positive Rewards
91(5)
Application Exercise 4.1: Beginning the Development of My Management System
93(3)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
96(1)
Summary
96(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
96(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
96(1)
For Your Discussion
97(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
98(1)
For Further Reading
98(1)
Notes
98(3)
PART II PLANNING FOR CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
101(86)
How Do I Plan and Select Content?
102(22)
Looking at Teachers
103(1)
Chapter Objectives
103(1)
Planning for Instruction
103(2)
Providing Successful Transitions
104(1)
Teacher-Student Collaborative Team Planning
104(1)
Reasons for Planning
105(1)
Scope of the Curriculum
105(1)
Planning with Curriculum Standards That Provide Guidance
105(4)
What the National Standards Are
105(1)
National Standards by Content Area
105(2)
Application Exercise 5.1: Examining National Curriculum Standards
107(2)
Curriculum Standards and High-Stakes Testing
109(1)
Planning with State/District Documents That Provide Guidance for Content Selection
109(1)
Planning with Student Textbooks That Provide Guidance for Content Selection
110(2)
Differentiated Instruction
110(2)
Multireading Approach
112(1)
Planning Sequencing of Content
112(1)
Preparing for and Dealing with Controversy
112(2)
Planning for Learning Outcomes: Goals and Objectives
114(1)
Planning with Instructional Objectives
114(1)
Learning Targets and Goal Indicators
114(1)
Planning with Domains of Learning and Developmental Needs of Children
115(4)
Cognitive Domain Hierarchy
115(1)
Affective Domain Hierarchy
116(1)
Psychomotor Domain Hierarchy
116(1)
Application Exercise 5.2: Preparing My Own Instructional Objectives
117(2)
Planning with Taxonomies
119(1)
Planning with Integrated Curriculum
119(1)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
120(1)
Summary
120(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
121(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
121(1)
For Your Discussion
121(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
122(1)
For Further Reading
122(1)
Notes
122(2)
How Do I Assess, Use, and Report Student Achievement?
124(26)
Looking at Teachers
125(1)
Chapter Objectives
125(1)
Purposes of Assessment
126(2)
Authentic Assessment: Advantages and Limitations
127(1)
Three Avenues of Assessment
128(3)
Assessing What a Student Says and Does
128(1)
Assessing What a Student Writes
128(3)
Student Involvement in Assessment
131(1)
Using Student Portfolios
131(1)
Using Checklists
132(1)
Using Student Conferences
132(1)
Testing for Achievement
132(5)
Standardized and Nonstandardized Tests
132(3)
How to Explain Standardized Test Scores
135(2)
When Test Scores Are Printed Publicly
137(1)
Purposes for Testing
137(1)
Preparing Assessment Items
137(1)
Types of Assessment Items: Descriptions, Examples, and Guidelines for Preparation and Use
138(5)
Essay
138(1)
Multiple Choice
139(1)
Performance Assessment: Expensive and Intensive
140(1)
Application Exercise 6.1: Preparing Assessment Items
141(2)
Reporting: Maintaining Records of Student Achievement
143(1)
Recording Teacher Observations and Judgments
143(1)
Grading and Marking Student Achievement
143(3)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
145(1)
Summary
146(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
146(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
146(1)
For Your Discussion
146(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
147(1)
For Further Reading
147(1)
Notes
147(3)
How Do I Prepare Activities, Lessons, and Units?
150(37)
Looking at Teachers
151(1)
Chapter Objectives
151(1)
Understanding Theoretical Considerations for the Selection of Instructional Strategies
151(4)
Decision Making and Strategy Selection
152(1)
Explicit and Implicit Instruction: A Clarification of Terms
152(1)
Principles of Classroom Instruction and Learning: A Synopsis
153(1)
Explicit Versus Implicit Instructional Modes: Strengths and Limitations of Each
153(2)
Selecting Learning Activities That Are Developmentally Appropriate
155(8)
The Learning Experiences Ladder
155(1)
Direct, Simulated, and Vicarious Experiences Help Connect Student Learning
156(1)
Developing the Learning Activities: The Heart and Spirit of Lessons
157(2)
Application Exercise 7.1: Putting Objectives, Resources, and Learning Activities Together for a Teaching Plan
159(4)
Preparing Lesson Plans: Rationale and Assumptions
163(1)
Rationale for Preparing Written Lesson Plans
163(1)
Assumptions About Lesson Planning
164(1)
Constructing a Lesson Plan: Format, Components, and Samples
164(9)
Basic Elements of a Lesson Plan
165(1)
Descriptive Data
165(5)
Goals and Objectives
170(1)
Rationale
171(1)
Procedure
171(2)
Assessment, Reflection, and Revision
173(1)
Preparing Instructional Units
173(3)
Planning and Developing Any Unit of Instruction
174(2)
Unit Format, Inclusive Elements, and Time Duration
176(1)
Planning and Developing an Interdisciplinary Thematic Unit
176(8)
Application Exercise 7.2: Preparing a Lesson Plan
179(2)
Application Exercise 7.3: Preparing an Instructional Unit: Bringing It All Together
181(2)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
183(1)
Summary
184(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
184(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
184(1)
For Your Discussion
184(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
185(1)
For Further Reading
185(1)
Notes
185(2)
PART III EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION, TEACHER ASSESSMENT, AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
187(114)
What Do I Need to Know to Use Teacher Talk and Questioning as Effective Instructional Tools?
188(24)
Looking at Teachers
189(1)
Chapter Objectives
189(1)
Teacher Talk: Formal and Informal
189(8)
Teacher Talk: General Guidelines
189(2)
Teacher Talk: Specific Guidelines
191(5)
Teacher Talk: Cautions
196(1)
Questioning
197(1)
Purposes for Using Questioning
197(2)
Questions to Avoid Asking
199(1)
Types of Cognitive Questions
199(2)
Clarifying Question
199(1)
Convergent-Thinking Question
199(1)
Cueing Question
199(1)
Divergent-Thinking Question
200(1)
Evaluative Question
200(1)
Focus Question
200(1)
Probing Question
200(1)
Socratic Question
200(1)
Student Thinking and Levels of Cognitive Questions
201(3)
Guidelines for Using Questioning
204(1)
Preparing Questions
204(1)
Implementing Questioning
204(1)
Questions from Students: The Question-Driven Classroom
204(5)
Questioning: The Cornerstone of Critical Thinking, Real-World Problem Solving, and Meaningful Learning
204(3)
Application Exercise 8.1: Practice in Raising Questions to Higher Levels
207(2)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
209(1)
Summary
209(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
209(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
209(1)
For Your Discussion
210(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
210(1)
For Further Reading
210(1)
Notes
211(1)
What Guidelines Assist My Use of Demonstrations, Thinking, Inquiry Learning, and Games?
212(22)
Looking at Teachers
213(1)
Chapter Objectives
213(1)
Demonstration
213(1)
Purposes of Demonstrations
213(1)
Guidelines for Using Demonstrations
214(1)
Teacher Thinking for Intelligent Behavior
214(3)
Characteristics of Intelligent Behavior
215(2)
Explicit Teaching for Thinking and Intelligent Behavior
217(1)
Inquiry Teaching and Discovery Learning
217(4)
Problem Solving
217(1)
Inquiry Versus Discovery
217(1)
True Inquiry
218(1)
Critical Thinking Skills of Discovery and Inquiry Learning
218(3)
Integrated Strategies for Integrated Learning
221(2)
Learning by Educational Games
223(7)
Classification of Educational Games
223(1)
Purposes of Educational Games
223(1)
Sources of Educational Games
224(3)
Application Exercise 9.1: Developing a Lesson Using Different Approaches: Inquiry Learning Level II, Thinking Skill Development, a Demonstration, or an Interactive Lecture---Peer Teaching
227(2)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
229(1)
Summary
230(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
230(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
230(1)
For Your Discussion
231(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
231(1)
For Further Reading
231(1)
Notes
232(2)
What Guidelines Assist My Use of Groupings and Assignments to Promote Positive Interaction and Quality Learning?
234(28)
Looking at Teachers
235(1)
Chapter Objectives
236(1)
Equality in the Classroom
236(3)
Student Rights
238(1)
Gender Discrimination
239(1)
Ensuring Equity
239(1)
Learning in Large Groups
239(4)
Student Presentations
239(1)
Whole-Class Discussion
240(1)
Application Exercise 10.1: Whole-Class Discussion as a Teaching Strategy: Building on What I Already Know
241(2)
Learning in Small Groups
243(1)
Purposes for Using Small Groups
243(1)
Cooperative Learning
243(2)
The Cooperative Learning Group
243(2)
Learning in Pairs
245(2)
Peer Tutoring, Mentoring, and Cross-Age Coaching
246(1)
Paired Team Learning
246(1)
Think-Pair-Share
246(1)
The Learning Center
246(1)
Learning Alone
247(1)
Mastery Learning and Personalized Instruction
247(1)
Today's Emphasis: Mastery or Quality Learning for All Students
247(1)
Assumptions About Mastery or Quality Learning
247(1)
Components of Any Mastery Learning Model
247(1)
Strategies for Personalizing the Instruction: Working Toward Quality Learning
248(1)
Learning from Assignments and Homework
248(2)
Purposes for Homework Assignments
248(2)
Opportunities for Recovery
250(1)
How to Avoid the Paper Crush
250(1)
Multiple Assessment
251(1)
Peer-Checking: Use with Caution
251(1)
Project-Centered Learning: Guiding Learning from Independent and Group Investigations, Papers, and Oral Reports
251(3)
Values and Purposes of Project-Centered Learning
252(1)
Guidelines for Guiding Students in Project-Centered Learning
252(1)
Writing Should Be a Required Component of Project-Centered Learning
253(1)
Assess the Final Product
254(1)
Writing Across the Curriculum
254(4)
Kinds of Writing
255(1)
Student Journals
256(1)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
257(1)
Summary
258(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
258(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
258(1)
For Your Discussion
258(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
259(1)
For Further Reading
259(1)
Notes
259(3)
How Can I Assess My Teaching Effectiveness and Continue My Professional Development?
262(39)
Looking at Teachers
263(1)
Chapter Objectives
263(1)
Teaching Effectiveness
263(8)
Through Student Teaching and Interning
263(1)
Student Teaching IS the Real Thing
264(1)
Getting Ready for Student Teaching
264(1)
First Impressions
264(1)
Comments from the University Supervisor
264(7)
Teaching Effectiveness Through E-Teaching: An Emergency E-Teaching Kit
271(6)
Purposes of E-Teaching with an Emergency E-Teaching Kit
271(1)
Developing an E-Teaching Kit with a Multidisciplinary Emphasis
271(2)
Application Exercise 11.1: Developing an Emergency E-Teaching Kit
273(4)
Finding a Teaching Position
277(5)
Guidelines for Locating a Teaching Position
277(1)
Through a Professional Career Portfolio
277(2)
Application Exercise 11.2: Development of a Professional Portfolio
279(2)
Resources for Locating Teaching Jobs
281(1)
State and Territorial Sources for Information About Credential and License Requirements
281(1)
The Professional Resume
281(1)
The In-Person Interview
282(1)
Professional Development
282(2)
Through Reflection
282(2)
Through Self-Assessment
284(1)
Through Journals or Logbooks
284(1)
A Teachalogue for Reflection and Self-Assessment
284(1)
Professional Development Through Mentoring
284(1)
Professional Development Through In-Service and Study
284(1)
Professional Development Through Professional Organizations
284(2)
Professional Development Through Communications with Other Teachers
286(1)
Professional Development Through the Internet, Additional Training, and Workshops
286(1)
Professional Development Through Peer Teaching
287(10)
Application Exercise 11.3: Pulling It All Together: Peer Teaching
289(3)
Form A: PT Preparation
292(1)
Form B: Peer Evaluation
293(2)
Form C: Teacher's Summative Peer Evaluation
295(2)
About Praxis and Other Teacher Tests
297(1)
Summary
297(1)
Extending My Professional Competency
297(1)
Praxis Warm-Up: A Constructed Response-Type Question
297(1)
For Your Discussion
298(1)
Online Portfolio Activities
298(1)
For Further Reading
298(1)
Notes
299(2)
Appendix: Hints for Short-Answer Response Questions: Praxis Warm-Ups 301(8)
Glossary 309(10)
Children's Literature Index 319(1)
Name Index 320(4)
Subject Index with Target Topics for Teacher Tests 324


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