9780521469692

The Rise of the Public in Enlightenment Europe

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521469692

  • ISBN10:

    0521469694

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-10-22
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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Summary

James Melton's lucid and accessible study examines the rise of 'the public' in eighteenth-century Europe. A work of comparative synthesis focusing on England, France and the German-speaking territories, this is the first book-length, critical reassessment of what Habermas termed the 'bourgeois public sphere'. During the Enlightenment the Public assumed a new significance as governments came to recognise the power of public opinion in political life; the expansion of print culture created new reading publics and transformed how and what people read; authors and authorship acquired new status, while the growth of commercialized theatres transferred monopoly over the stage from the court to the audience; salons, coffeehouses, taverns and Masonic lodges fostered new practices of sociability. Spanning a variety of disciplines, this important addition to New Approaches in European History will be of great interest to students of social and political history, literary studies, political theory, and the history of women.

Table of Contents

List of tables
xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Introduction: What is the public sphere? 1(16)
Part I Politics and the rise of ``public opinion'': the cases of England and France 17(62)
The peculiarities of the English
19(26)
Foundations of English exceptionalism
19(8)
Politics and the press
27(6)
Radicalism and extraparliamentary politics after 1760
33(6)
Ambiguities of the political public sphere
39(6)
Opacity and transparency: French political culture in the eighteenth century
45(34)
Jansenism and the emergence of an oppositional public sphere
48(7)
The politics of publicity
55(6)
Secrecy and its discontents
61(18)
Part II Readers, writers, and spectators 79(116)
Reading publics: transformations of the literary public sphere
81(42)
Literacy in the eighteenth century
81(5)
The reading revolution
86(6)
Periodicals, novels, and the literary public sphere
92(12)
The rise of the lending library
104(6)
The public and its problems
110(13)
Writing publics: eighteenth-century authorship
123(37)
The status of the author in England, France, and Germany
124(13)
Authorship as property: the rise of copyright
137(11)
Women and authorship
148(12)
From courts to consumers: theater publics
160(35)
The stage legitimated
162(4)
The theater and the court
166(5)
London
171(6)
Paris
177(6)
Vienna
183(12)
Part III Being sociable 195(78)
Women in public: enlightenment salons
197(29)
The rise of the salon
199(3)
Women and sociability in Enlightenment thought
202(3)
Salon culture in eighteenth-century Paris
205(6)
The salon in eighteenth-century England
211(4)
Salons of Vienna and Berlin
215(11)
Drinking in public: taverns and coffeehouses
226(26)
Alcohol and sociability
227(2)
Taverns and politics: the case of London
229(6)
Paris: from cabaret to cafe
235(5)
The political culture of coffee
240(4)
Coffee, capitalism, and the world of learning
244(3)
Coffeehouse sociability
247(5)
Freemasonry: toward civil society
252(21)
The rise of freemasonry
254(3)
Inclusion and exclusion
257(5)
Freemasonry and politics
262(11)
Conclusion 273(4)
Index 277

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