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Rockin' Out: Popular Music in the USA with CD,9780131897854
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Rockin' Out: Popular Music in the USA with CD

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131897854

ISBN10:
0131897853
Format:
Paperback w/Disk
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $70.20
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Summary

Rockin' Out provides a comprehensive social history of popular music in the United States from the heyday of Tin Pan Alley to the current sounds of electronic dance music and teen pop, from the invention of the phonograph to the promise of the Internet. It offers an analysis and critique of the music itself and the conditions of its production and consumption. The book is organized chronologically and thematically around particular genres/styles of music and addresses such dimensions as race, class, gender, ethnicity, technology, copyright and the structure of the music industry as they affect the development of the music. The author examines the Tin Pan Alley era, mass media and the construction of race, the rise of rhythm and blues, the eruption of rock 'n' roll, the reaction to rock 'n' roll, the sixties, fragmentation of pop, the poles of pop, the eighties, youth culture and censorship, packaging pop for the new millennium and the future of music. For music fans and historians.

Author Biography

Reebee Garofalo has taught at the University of Massachusetts Boston since 1978.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Introduction: Definitions, Themes, and Issues 1(324)
Into the Twentieth Century: Popular Music and Mass Culture
2(2)
Rock 'n' Roll: The Birth of a New Era
4(4)
Marketing and the Politics of Race, Language, and Gender
8(5)
No Hablamos Espaņol: The Language Barrier
11(1)
The Long, Hard Climb: Gender Discrimination
12(1)
Regulating Popular Music
13(2)
1 Mass Technology and Popular Taste: The Tin Pan Alley Era
15(20)
Sound Recording: From Cylinder to Disc
16(5)
Tin Pan Alley Constructs the Mainstream Tradition
21(6)
Tin Pan Alley Incorporates African American Music
22(3)
Tin Pan Alley Consolidates Its Power
25(2)
Commercial Broadcasting: A Very Private Enterprise
27(5)
The Growth of Network Radio
28(2)
The Advertisers Versus the Programmers
30(2)
Hollywood Bolsters Tin Pan Alley
32(3)
2 Blues and Country Music: Mass Media and the Construction of Race
35(18)
Blues and Country: More Equal than Separate
36(2)
"Race" Music: The Popular Sounds of Black America
38(4)
"Hillbilly": The Music of the White Working Class
42(3)
The Dissemination of Blues and Country: More Separate than Equal
45(4)
The Long Road Back for Records
49(4)
3 "Good Rockin' Tonight": The Rise of Rhythm and Blues
53
The Publishers and the Broadcasters: ASCAP Versus BMI
54(2)
Enter the Deejay: The Broadcasters Versus the AFM
56(2)
From Big Bands to Solo Singers
58(2)
The Major Labels Reclaim Country Music
60(2)
The Independents Promote Rhythm and Blues
62(6)
High Fidelity/Low Overhead
68(2)
Television and the Suppression of FM Broadcasting
70(2)
Independent Radio: Deejays in Your Face
72
4 Crossing Cultures: The Eruption of Rock 'n' Roll
11(102)
Cultural Diversity: The Roots of Rock 'n' Roll
78(3)
Structural Changes in the Music Industry
81(3)
Sounds of the Cities
84(17)
New Orleans: The Fertile Crescent of Rock 'n' Roll
84(5)
Los Angeles: From Jump Blues to Chicano Rock
89(3)
Chicago: The Blues Electrified
92(3)
Cincinnati: The Crossroads of Blues and Country
95(1)
R&B Sanctified: The Gospel Connection
96(5)
Doo Wop: The Intersection of Gospel, Jazz, and Pop
101(9)
Rockabilly: The Country Strain
110(3)
5 The Empire Strikes Back: The Reaction to Rock 'n' Roll
113(38)
The Established Powers Fight Back
125(7)
Covering the Bases
127(3)
Pop Diversions: From Kingston Town to the Kingston Trio
130(2)
Schlock Rock: Enter the White Middle Class
132(8)
Television's Greatest Hits
136(2)
The Brill Building: The New Tin Pan Alley
138(2)
The Official Attack on Rock 'n' Roll
140(5)
Surf's Up!
145(6)
6 Popular Music and Political Culture: The Sixties
151(48)
The Civil Rights Movement and Popular Music
152(14)
The "Girl Groups" and the Men Behind Them
153(5)
Motown: The Integration of Pop
158(4)
Folk Music: The Voice of Civil Rights
162(4)
The British Invasion Occupies the Pop Charts
166(8)
Breaking the Sounds of Silence
174(7)
Folk Rock: Adding Substance to Form
174(3)
Black (Music) Is Beautiful
177(4)
Against the Grain: The Counterculture
181(18)
Blues on Acid: Psychedelic Rock
182(3)
Commercializing the Counterculture: The Monterey Pop Festival
185(4)
Riding the Storm
189(4)
Woodstock and Altamont: Reaching the Heights, Taking the Fall
193(6)
7 Music Versus Markets: The fragmentation of Pop
199(50)
The Music Industry: A Sound Investment
200(7)
Merger Mania
201(1)
Expanding the Infrastructure: Counterculture as Commodity
202(5)
Creativity and Commerce: Rock as Art
207(7)
Sweeter Soul Music
214(6)
Singer/Songwriters, Soft Rock Solutions, and More
220(8)
Women's Music: The Feminist Alternative
228(3)
From Country Rock to Southern Boogie
231(7)
Mad with Power: Heavy Metal
238(8)
All That Glitters Does Not Sell Gold
246(3)
8 Punk and Disco: The Poles of Pop
249
Punk Versus Disco
251(2)
Punk: Rock as (White) Noise
253(24)
Born in the U.S.A.
255(8)
Anarchy in the U.K.
263(4)
Flirtation with Fascism: The Underbelly of Punk
267(3)
Rock Against Racism: The Progressive Rejoinder
270(3)
Riding the New Wave
273(4)
Disco: The Rhythm Without the Blues
277
Proto-Disco: The Funk Connection
278(4)
Up from the Disco Underground
282(3)
Mainstream Disco: The Bee Gees Boogie Down
285(3)
The Hard-Rock Reaction
288
9 Music Videos, Superstars, and Mega-Events: The Eighties
191(134)
Early Music Television: They Want Their MTV
293(8)
Superstars: The Road to Economic Recovery
301(10)
Charity Rock and Mega-Events: Who Is the World?
311(12)
Christmas in Ethiopia: The Advent of Charity Rock
312(4)
Mega-Events: The Politics of Mass Culture
316(7)
Technology and the New International Music Industry
323(2)
10 Rap and Metal: Youth Culture and Censorship 325(40)
The Continuing History of Heavy Metal
327(10)
Heavy Metal: The New Wave
327(4)
Metal Fragments
331(6)
Hip Hop, Don't Stop
337(12)
Old School Rap
337(3)
Hip Hop: The Next Generation
340(9)
Popular Music and the Politics of Censorship
349(18)
The Parents Music Resource Center
350(3)
The Issues: Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll Revisited
353(12)
11 Mainstreaming Alternatives: Packaging Pop for the New Millennium 365(56)
Alternative as Mainstream
367(10)
Seattle: From Sub Pop to Superstars
368(5)
Lollapalooza: Mainstreaming Counterculture
373(4)
Country: The Other Alternative
377(2)
Packaging Pop Trends: The Search for The Next Big Thing
379(26)
Electronic Dance Music
384(7)
The Year(s) of the Woman and the Rage Rock Backlash
391(5)
Teen Pop: Boy Bands and Teen Queens
396(4)
The Year of Latin (o) Music(ians)
400(5)
Black Music at the Base
405(17)
R&B/Hip Hop
405(3)
The Rap Juggernaut
408(13)
12 The future of Music 421(34)
They Want Their MP3
422(12)
Legislation and Litigation
423(4)
Piracy and Theft
427(2)
The Music Industry in a Post-Napster World
429(5)
Popular Music after 9/11
434(12)
Corporate Radio and the New Patriotism
437(3)
Country Music Goes to War
440(4)
Dissent Unplugged
444(2)
And Now for Something Completely Familiar
446(9)
Notes 455
Bibliography 413(68)
Subject Index 481(22)
Music Index 503

Excerpts

As I try to collapse the prefaces from the first two editions ofRockin' Outinto a third, I find that most of the reasons I offered initially for writing the book are still true today. Popular music--playing it, listening to it, learning from it, teaching others what I know--has been one of the organizing principles of my life ever since I can remember. It energizes me, provides the soundtrack for significant moments in my life, and helps me to navigate the world around me. In the society at large, discussions of its significance can be found everywhere from family dinners and Saturday night parties to boardrooms and congressional chambers. There has also been an increasing interest in popular music courses on college and university campuses. The fact that popular music has been a source of pleasure for millions of people all over the world is reason enough for listening to it. But popular music is also a social and political indicator that mirrors and influences the society in which we live. This is the reason for studying it.Rockin' Outoffers one way to do that. In my view, popular music cannot be fully understood simply as a set of "musical" elements in the traditional sense, and then measured against some abstract aesthetic notion of quality. While it is always important to explore the specificities of the music itself in studying popular music, it is equally important to recognize that the musical text is as much a product of its social and political context as any individual's creativity or talent. Because the enslavement and subsequent oppression of African-Americans and resulting cultural interactions have had such a profound effect on the development of our popular music, my inclination is to view popular music first through the lens of race. Other crucial demographic variables include age, gender, and ethnicity. Technological advances and the political economy of the music industry have also been important in shaping the development of popular music. Finally, popular music invariably develops in relation to the prevailing political climate in a given era. These, then, are the themes that run through this book. Because the notion of "popularity" has an obvious quantitative dimension, I attach a certain amount of importance to sales data. Accordingly,Rockin' Outis peppered with popularity chart listings and references to "gold" and "platinum" records--the sale of 500,000 and 1 million album units, respectively. At the same time it is important to note that commercially successful artists and records may or may not be the most influential or artistically important. Historical accounts, musical analyses, critical reviews, and audience reactions are important qualitative indicators that must also be factored into any discussion of popular music. Rockin' Outnow takes popular music history into the twenty-first century with commentary on everything from peer-to-peer file sharing networks and their implications for copyright to the crucial changes that have defined popular music culture in the aftermath of 9/11. Earlier parts of the book have been made more user friendly by converting a number of artist and song lists from the text into easy-to-understand tables that give the reader a graphic sense of historical patterns and preserve the narrative for more important analytic points. The addition of a song index made the second edition more useful as a source book. The biggest changes in the third edition have been the inclusion of a compilation CD, which offers a sampling of the popular styles that dominated the twentieth century, and a foldout chart of "The Genealogy of Pop/Rock Music" that originally appeared (under a different title) in my first, co-authored book,Rock 'n' Roll Is Here to Payin 1977. The original version of the chart has made recent appearances in Edward R. Tufte's elegant graphics text,Visual Explanations(1997), an


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