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Roman Art : Romulus to Constantine,9780131504875
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Roman Art : Romulus to Constantine

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131504875

ISBN10:
0131504878
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $104.40
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Summary

Fully revised and further enlarged, with more color illustrations and fresh topics, this is the fourth edition of an absorbing introduction to the painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts of the Roman world. Clear and comprehensive, it covers the 1,300 years from the Etruscan forerunners of the Romans to the introduction of Christianity under the Emperor Constantine the Great. The new edition introduces such subjects as rescue excavations, art for private patrons, and erotic art. New features include a timeline of the major periods, events, and artworks; more family trees of the imperial dynasties; and a table of Roman gods and goddesses and their Greek equivalents. The text now includes more on daily life, mosaics, and building techniques, and discusses the art of each political period, while also looking at history, myth, literature, and social customs. The clearly written text, incorporating the most up-to-date scholarship, is complemented by numerous new color photographs as well as maps, plans, and diagrams, an expanded glossary and bibliography, and lists of ancient authors and Roman emperors.

Author Biography

Andrew Ramage is Professor of the History of Art and Archaeology at Cornell University.

Table of Contents

Preface 7(2)
Introduction 9(1)
The Land
9(2)
Chronology
11(2)
The Political Framework
13(2)
The Republic
13(1)
The Empire
13(2)
Art in the Service of the State
15(3)
Fascism and Propaganda
16(2)
The Romans' Acquisition of Art Objects
18(1)
Art for Private Patrons
18(3)
Archaeological Ethics
21(3)
Restoration and Forgery
21(1)
The History of Collecting
22(1)
Rescue Excavations
22(2)
Illegal Excavation and Export of Antiquities
24(1)
Rome and Greek Art
24(5)
Three Periods of Greek Art
24(1)
Winckelmann and 18th-century Restorations
25(2)
Interconnections
27(2)
The Etruscan Forerunners 1000--200 BC
29(32)
The Etruscans: the Villanovan Phase
29(2)
The Etruscans: the Historical Phase
31(2)
Architecture
33(5)
Tombs
33(3)
Temples
36(1)
Domestic Buildings
37(1)
Sculpture
38(11)
Temple Terracottas
39(1)
Animal Sculpture
40(3)
Funerary Sculpture
43(2)
Statuary
45(1)
Portraits
46(3)
Painting
49(6)
Bronze Articles
55(2)
Rome, the Etruscans, and Latium
57(1)
Stories of Early Rome
57(2)
Overview
59(2)
The Roman Republic 509--27 BC
61(40)
Architecture
61(7)
Villas and Houses
61(2)
Sanctuaries
63(3)
Temples
66(2)
Waterworks
68(1)
The Cloaca Maxima
68(1)
Town Planning
68(5)
The ``Servian'' Wall
68(1)
The Roman Forum
69(2)
The Castrum
71(2)
Sculpture
73(9)
Sarcophagi
73(1)
Historical Relief Sculpture
74(3)
Portraiture
77(5)
Wall Paintings
82(14)
An Early Tomb
82(1)
House Walls
83(1)
Four Pompeian Styles
83(13)
Mosaics
96(3)
Overview
99(2)
Augustus and the Imperial Idea 27 BC--AD 14
101(32)
Architecture
101(10)
The Forum and Mausoleum of Augustus
102(3)
A Round Bath Building
105(1)
A Temple in Gaul
106(1)
Theaters
106(2)
The Arch
108(1)
Monuments Along a Renovated Roadway
109(1)
A City in Spain
110(1)
Sculpture
111(16)
Portraits
111(5)
Reliefs
116(11)
Wall Paintings
127(4)
Stucco
131(1)
Overview
131(2)
The Julio-Claudians AD 14--68
133(24)
The Gemma Augustea
133(1)
Imperial Patronage in the Provinces
134(2)
Imperial Architecture and Sculpture
136(4)
Another Version of the Blinding of Polyphemus
139(1)
Portraits
140(4)
The Other Julio-Claudians
140(2)
Ordinary Citizens
142(2)
Sculpture
144(2)
Piety
144(1)
The Imperial Hero
145(1)
Public Works
146(4)
Aqueducts
146(4)
Architecture
150(5)
The Underground Basilica
150(1)
Nero's Golden House
150(5)
Overview
155(2)
The Flavians: Savior to Despot AD 69-98
157(36)
Vespasian
157(1)
Imperial Architecture
158(9)
The Colosseum
158(5)
The Stadium of Domitian
163(1)
The Arch of Titus
164(2)
The Flavian Palace
166(1)
Sculpture
167(8)
Imperial Reliefs
167(2)
Private Reliefs
169(2)
Portraits
171(4)
Pompeii and Herculaneum
175(16)
The City of Pompeii
179(2)
Paintings in the Fourth Pompeian Style
181(10)
Art for the Middle Classes
191(1)
Overview
191(2)
Trajan, Optimus Princeps AD 98--117
193(20)
The Baths of Trajan
194(1)
The Forum and Markets of Trajan
195(3)
The Column of Trajan
198(6)
Other Trajanic Sculptural Relief
204(2)
The Arch of Trajan at Benevento
206(2)
The Provinces
208(3)
A Great Bridge
208(1)
Timgad
208(3)
Overview
211(2)
Hadrian and the Classical Revival AD 117--138
213(28)
Architecture
215(16)
Hadrian's Villa
215(4)
The Pantheon
219(4)
Other Hadrianic Buildings
223(8)
Portraits
231(2)
Reliefs
233(2)
Sarcophagi
235(4)
Sarcophagi from Rome and Athens
235(4)
Asiatic Sarcophagi
239(1)
Overview
239(2)
The Antonines AD 138--193
241(28)
The Antonine Family
241(1)
The Reign of Antoninus Pius
242(4)
Portraits
242(1)
Architecture
243(1)
Reliefs
244(2)
The Reign of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus
246(21)
Portraits
246(6)
The Base of the Column of Antoninus Pius
252(2)
Panels from a Triumphal Arch
254(1)
The Column of Marcus Aurelius
254(5)
Sarcophagi
259(8)
The Reign of Commodus
267(1)
Overview
267(2)
The Severans AD 193--235
269(26)
The Reign of Septimius Severus
269(19)
Portraits
270(3)
Triumphal Arches
273(6)
Architecture in Distant Lands
279(9)
The Reign of Caracalla
288(5)
Public Baths
290(2)
Sarcophagi
292(1)
Overview
293(2)
The Soldier Emperors AD 235-284
295(14)
Coins
296(1)
Portraits
296(7)
Maximinus Thrax
296(1)
Balbinus
297(1)
Philip the Arab
298(1)
Trebonianus Gallus
298(2)
A Female Portrait
300(1)
Gallienus
300(1)
Aurelian
301(2)
The Aurelian Wall
303(1)
Sarcophagi
303(2)
A Domestic Quarter and its Paintings
305(2)
Overview
307(2)
The Tetrarchs AD 284--312
309(16)
The Establishment of the Tetrarchy
309(1)
Architecture in Spalato
310(3)
Architecture in Rome
313(2)
Architecture in Northern Greece
315(3)
Mosaics
318(2)
Portraiture
320(3)
Decennalia Relief
323(1)
Overview
323(2)
Constantine and the Aftermath AD 307--337
325(23)
Late Antique Art
325(1)
Imperial Monuments
326(6)
The Arch of Constantine
326(5)
The Base of the Obelisk of Theodosius
331(1)
Portraits
332(3)
Architecture
335(5)
Sarcophagi
340(3)
Luxury Arts
343(4)
Conclusion
347(1)
Timeline 348(2)
Roman Emperors 350(1)
Ancient Authors 350(1)
Roman Gods and Goddesses and their Greek Equivalents 351(1)
Glossary 351(5)
Select Bibliography 356(4)
Illustration Credits 360(2)
Index 362

Excerpts

This book grows from three roots: first and foremost, our teaching, which time and again has proven to be a rich field for learning, and for thinking of ways to explain a problem in as straightforward a manner as possible; secondly, our first-hand experience working at Roman sites, primarily in England, Italy, and Turkey; and thirdly, the frequent discussions we hold about Roman affairs--at the bottom of a trench, or over the dinner table. Nancy Ramage's participation long ago in the work of the British School at Rome enabled her to live, so to speak, with the art and the ruins; and our joint work at Sardis, Turkey, has given us the opportunity to participate in an on-going excavation, and to see the results of a group effort unfold over many years. The book is intended for students and readers who are launching into the study of Roman art perhaps for the first time. We assume intelligent readers, but we have tried to explain what may not be obvious in terms of background, be it linguistic, historical, or religious. With a view to showing something of the long study of Roman monuments, we have chosen some of the illustrations from older photographs, engravings, and paintings, which sometimes seem to capture the spirit better than modern ones. The architectural remains have been cited and illustrated as their importance requires, but we have tried to illustrate sculpture or painting from collections in the United States, Britain, and Canada, where possible, so that North American and British students will have a better chance of looking at some of the originals. It has given us great pleasure to know that not only English-speaking students and members of the public are learning from our book, but also those who are French, German, Dutch, or Greek, now that the book has been translated into those languages, perhaps with more to come. We are immensely gratified and humbled by this development. Of the many scholars who taught us about Roman art, we would especially like to share our warm appreciation here for the inspiration of several mentors who are no longer living: Doris Taylor Bishop, George M.A. Hanfmann, A.H. McDonald, and John B. Ward-Perkins. It has been a great pleasure to prepare the fourth edition, attempting always to keep the text and pictures up to standard. It has given us the opportunity to update the scholarship based on new studies, and to incorporate new material to enhance the coverage of this book. For instance, we have expanded the discussion of different marbles thanks to Amanda Claridge's expertise shared in her book,Rome: An Oxford Archaeological Guide.For help in the revising of this edition, we would first like to thank the following for their assistance and ideas: Barbara Barletta, Elizabeth Bartman, Bettina Bergmann, Beth Cohen, Caroline Downing, Robin Hicks, Nathaniel Infante, Diana Kleiner, Peter Kuniholm, Richard Mason, Mette Moltesen, Jenifer Neils, David Parrish, Lynn Roller and Wendy Watson. We are also grateful to Heather Farley, a student who won an Emerson Collaborative Grant from Ithaca College to work with Nancy Ramage on Roman art. And we enthusiastically thank the following friends and colleagues for their many insightful suggestions for this edition: Nancy T de Grummond, Carol Mattusch, Mary Sturgeon, and Susan Woodford. We also thank our students at Ithaca College, Cornell University, and the State University of New York at Potsdam for their many probing questions, thoughtful comments, and lively discussions through many courses taught over the years. After all, we wrote this book for them--and for students in a much wider circle--in the first place. For their excellent support and high professionalism in the preparation of the fourth edition, we are grateful to editorial and administrative colleagues at Laurence King Publishing in London, specifically Elisabeth Ingles, Lee Ripley Greenfield, Kara Hattersley-Smith, and Rich


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