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A Rulebook for Arguments,9780872205529

A Rulebook for Arguments

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780872205529

ISBN10:
0872205525
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Hackett Pub Co Inc
List Price: $6.95

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Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 1/1/2001.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

Updated examples, streamlined text, and the chapter on definition reworked in a rule-based format strengthen this already strong volume. Readers familiar with the previous edition will find a text that retains all the features that make Rulebook ideally suited for use as a supplementary course book -- including its modest price and compact size. Unlike most textbooks on argumentative writing, Rulebook is organised around specific rules, illustrated and explained soundly and briefly. It is not a textbook, but a rulebook, whose goal is to help students get on with writing a paper or assessing an argument.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Introduction xi
I. Composing a Short Argument: Some General Rules 1(9)
Distinguish premises and conclusion
1(2)
Present your ideas in a natural order
3(1)
Start from reliable premises
4(1)
Be concrete and concise
5(1)
Avoid loaded language
6(1)
Use consistent terms
7(1)
Stick to one meaning for each term
8(2)
II. Arguments by Example 10(9)
Give more than one example
11(1)
Use representative examples
12(2)
Background information is crucial
14(3)
Consider counterexamples
17(2)
III. Arguments by Analogy 19(5)
Analogy requires a relevantly similar example
21(3)
IV. Arguments from Authority 24(8)
Sources should be cited
25(1)
Seek informed sources
26(2)
Seek impartial sources
28(2)
Cross-check sources
30(1)
Personal attacks do not disqualify a source
30(2)
V. Arguments about Causes 32(8)
Explain how cause leads to effect
33(2)
Propose the most likely cause
35(1)
Correlated events are not necessarily related
36(1)
Correlated events may have a common cause
36(2)
Either of two correlated events may cause the other
38(1)
Causes may be complex
38(2)
VI. Deductive Arguments 40(13)
Modus Ponens
41(1)
Modus Tollens
42(2)
Hypothetical Syllogism
44(2)
Disjunctive Syllogism
46(1)
Dilemma
47(1)
Reductio ad absurdum
48(2)
Deductive arguments in several steps
50(3)
VII. Composing an Argumentative Essay A. Exploring the Issue 53(6)
A1. Explore the arguments on all sides of the issue
54(2)
A2. Question and defend each argument's premises
56(1)
A3. Revise and rethink arguments as they emerge
57(2)
VIII. Composing an Argumentative Essay B. Main Points of the Essay 59(5)
B1. Explain the question
59(1)
B2. Make a definite claim or proposal
60(1)
B3. Develop your arguments fully
61(1)
B4. Consider objections
62(1)
B5. Consider alternatives
63(1)
IX. Composing an Argumentative Essay C. Writing 64(7)
C1. Follow your outline
64(1)
C2. Keep the introduction brief
65(1)
C3. Give your arguments one at a time
65(2)
C4. Clarify, clarify, clarify
67(1)
C5. Support objections with arguments
68(1)
C6. Don't claim more than you have shown
69(2)
X. Fallacies 71(8)
The Two Great Fallacies
71(2)
Some Classical Fallacies
73(6)
Appendix: Definition 79(7)
D1. When terms are unclear, get specific
80(2)
D2. When terms are contested, work from the clear cases
82(2)
D3. Don't expect definitions to do the work of arguments
84(2)
Next Steps 86


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