9780471655756

Ruling Distributed Dynamic Worlds

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780471655756

  • ISBN10:

    0471655759

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2005-05-31
  • Publisher: Wiley-Interscience

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

A sequel to Mobile Processing in Distributed and Open Environments, this title introduces an extended, universal WAVE-WP model for distributed processing and control in dynamic and open worlds of any natures. The new control theory and technology introduced in the book can be widely used for the design and implementation of many distributed control systems, such as intelligent network management for the Internet, mobile cooperative robots, Rapid Reaction forces, future Combat Systems, robotics and AI, NMD, space research on other planets, and other applications. This title: Demonstrates a much simpler and more efficient application programming Cultivates a new kind of thinking about how large dynamic systems should be designed, organized, tasked, simulated, and controlled Introduces an extended, universal WAVE-WP model for distributed processing Compares the universal WAVE-WP model to other existing systems used in intelligent networking

Author Biography

PETER S. SAPATY, PhD, is Director of Distributed Simulation and Control, Institute of Mathematical Machines and Systems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. He also worked in Germany, UK, Canada, and Japan as project leader and research professor, and is currently a visiting professor at the University of Aizu in Japan.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
1 INTRODUCTION 1(32)
1.1 Toward Coordination and Management of Large Systems
1(4)
1.1.1 Shifting from Computation to Coordination
1(1)
1.1.2 Overoperability Versus Interoperability
2(1)
1.1.3 Intelligent Systems Versus Intelligent Components
3(1)
1.1.4 Directly Operating in Physical World
4(1)
1.1.5 Distributed Artificial Life
5(1)
1.2 Problems of Managing Large Distributed Systems
5(3)
1.2.1 From Localized to Distributed Solutions
5(1)
1.2.2 More Distribution Problems and Details
6(2)
1.3 WAVE-WP: Basic Ideas
8(2)
1.3.1 The Whole First
8(1)
1.3.2 WAVE-WP Spatial Automaton
9(1)
1.3.3 Implementation Basics
9(1)
1.4 Example: The Shortest Path Problem
10(11)
1.4.1 Importance of Distributed and Parallel Solutions
11(1)
1.4.2 Finding Shortest Path Tree
11(2)
1.4.3 Collecting the Shortest Path Between Nodes
13(2)
1.4.4 Main Problems of Distributed Implementation
15(1)
1.4.5 Universal WAVE-WP Interpreters
16(1)
1.4.6 Shortest Path Tree Finding in WAVE-WP
17(2)
1.4.7 Shortest Path Collection in WAVE-WP
19(1)
1.4.8 Full Program for Finding Shortest Path
20(1)
1.5 Example: Distributed Knowledge Representation and Processing
21(5)
1.5.1 Knowledge Network
21(1)
1.5.2 Elementary Query 1
22(2)
1.5.3 Elementary Query 2
24(2)
1.6 System organization as a function of the application scenario
26(1)
1.7 Relation to the Previous Book
26(1)
1.8 Comparison with Other Works in Related Areas
27(3)
1.8.1 Parallel Computing
27(1)
1.8.2 Distributed Systems and Distributed Computing
27(1)
1.8.3 Parallel and Distributed Computing
28(1)
1.8.4 Computer Networking
28(1)
1.8.5 Intelligent Agents
28(1)
1.8.6 Mobile Agents
28(1)
1.8.7 Grid Computing
29(1)
1.8.8 Spatial Programming
29(1)
1.8.9 Mobile Robotics, Cooperative Robotics
29(1)
1.8.10 System Management
29(1)
1.9 Organization of the Book
30(3)
2 WORLDS AND WAVES IN THE WAVE-WP MODEL 33(26)
2.1 Physical World
34(4)
2.1.1 Temporary Physical World Nodes
34(1)
2.1.2 Visiting Existing Nodes in a Region
35(1)
2.1.3 Destination Regions for New Nodes
36(1)
2.1.4 Accessing Physical World Parameters
36(1)
2.1.5 Broadcasting in Physical World
37(1)
2.2 Virtual World
38(4)
2.2.1 Knowledge Networks
38(1)
2.2.2 Access to Nodes and Links
39(1)
2.2.3 Tunnel and Surface Broadcasting
40(1)
2.2.4 Linking with Alien Networks
41(1)
2.3 United Physical-Virtual World
42(2)
2.3.1 The Integration Details
42(1)
2.3.2 Access to Nodes in the United World
43(1)
2.3.3 United World Dynamics
44(1)
2.3.4 Time and Speed
44(1)
2.4 Execution World
44(3)
2.4.1 Doers and Their Connections
45(1)
2.4.2 Distribution of Physical-Virtual World Between Doers
46(1)
2.4.3 Absolute and Mapping Addresses
47(1)
2.4.4 Further Integration of Physical-Virtual-Execution World
47(1)
2.5 Waves
47(9)
2.5.1 Nature of Waves
47(2)
2.5.2 Navigation in Space
49(1)
2.5.3 Actions in Nodes
49(1)
2.5.4 Coverage with Rules
50(1)
2.5.5 Composition and Structuring of Waves
50(3)
2.5.6 Wave Expressions and Remote Data
53(2)
2.5.7 Delivery and Processing of Physical Matter
55(1)
2.6 Conclusions
56(3)
3 WORLD PROCESSING LANGUAGE 59(40)
3.1 Top Language Organization
60(2)
3.2 Data Definitions
62(4)
3.2.1 General on Constants
62(1)
3.2.2 Special Constants
63(3)
3.2.3 Vectors
66(1)
3.3 Variables
66(7)
3.3.1 Nodal Variables
67(1)
3.3.2 Frontal Variables
67(1)
3.3.3 Environmental Variables
68(5)
3.4 Acts
73(12)
3.4.1 Flow Acts
74(7)
3.4.2 Fusion Acts
81(4)
3.5 Rules
85(1)
3.5.1 Rules in General
85(1)
3.5.2 State Generalization Procedure
85(1)
3.6 Forward Rules
86(7)
3.6.1 Branching Rules
86(3)
3.6.2 Repetition
89(1)
3.6.3 Synchronization
90(1)
3.6.4 Protecting Common Resources
90(1)
3.6.5 Network Creation
91(1)
3.6.6 Autonomy Rules
92(1)
3.7 Echo Rules
93(2)
3.8 Expressions
95(1)
3.9 Working with Physical Matter
96(1)
3.10 Conclusions
97(2)
4 DISTRIBUTED WAVE-WP INTERPRETATION IN DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENTS 99(24)
4.1 Doers and Their Networks
99(2)
4.2 Wave-WP Interpreter Architecture
101(5)
4.2.1 Main Interpreter Components
101(3)
4.2.2 Exemplary Interpretation Patterns
104(1)
4.2.3 Integration of the Interpreter with Other Systems
105(1)
4.3 Track Infrastructure
106(3)
4.3.1 Forward and Backward Operations
106(1)
4.3.2 Optimization of the Track Network
107(2)
4.4 Elementary Operations Involving Multiple Doers
109(6)
4.4.1 Local Operations in Doers
109(2)
4.4.2 Creating a New Virtual Node in Another Doer
111(2)
4.4.3 Moving into a New Physical Location
113(2)
4.5 More Complex Spatial Operations
115(3)
4.5.1 Moving Data Through Tracks
116(1)
4.5.2 Migration of Knowledge Networks Between Doers
117(1)
4.6 Other Distributed Interpretation Issues
118(3)
4.6.1 Mapping Strategies
118(1)
4.6.2 Dealing with Shortage of Vehicles
118(3)
4.7 Conclusions
121(2)
5 SPATIAL PROGRAMMING IN WAVE-WP 123(34)
5.1 Traditional Sequential and Parallel Programming
123(7)
5.1.1 Programming in a Single Doer
123(3)
5.1.2 Programming in Multiple Doers
126(4)
5.2 Virtual World Programming
130(10)
5.2.1 Creating Virtual World as a Knowledge Network
130(2)
5.2.2 Inhabiting the Virtual World with Mobile Entities
132(2)
5.2.3 Providing Openness of the Virtual World
134(1)
5.2.4 Observation of the Virtual World
135(2)
5.2.5 Distributed Inference in the Virtual World
137(2)
5.2.6 Mobility of the Virtual World in the Execution World
139(1)
5.3 Mobility of Doers in Physical World
140(4)
5.3.1 Movement of a Single Doer
140(1)
5.3.2 Free Movement of Multiple Doers
141(1)
5.3.3 Synchronized Movement of Multiple Doers
141(1)
5.3.4 Movement of Multiple Doers by Turns
142(1)
5.3.5 Adding Payloads to Mobile Doers
143(1)
5.4 Moving and Acting in Physical World Directly
144(7)
5.4.1 Sequential Movement in Physical World
145(2)
5.4.2 Parallel Movement in Physical World
147(1)
5.4.3 Combined Sequential-Parallel Movement
147(3)
5.4.4 Adding Payload: Planting Trees
150(1)
5.5 Programming in Integration of Physical and Virtual Worlds
151(5)
5.5.1 Planting Trees in the United World
151(2)
5.5.2 Observation in the United World
153(1)
5.5.3 Programming of Spatial Dynamics
154(2)
5.6 Conclusions
156(1)
6 EXEMPLARY MISSION SCENARIOS 157(28)
6.1 Coordinated Movement of a Group
158(9)
6.1.1 Stepwise Movement of a Two-Level Hierarchy
158(1)
6.1.2 Creation of a Persistent Infrastructure and Moving with It
159(1)
6.1.3 Extending to Any Number of Layers
160(1)
6.1.4 Simultaneous Movement of All Nodes in a Group
161(1)
6.1.5 Moving to the Averaged Positions of Subordinates
162(1)
6.1.6 Further Possible Group Movement Modifications
163(1)
6.1.7 Reverse or Heads-First Movement
163(1)
6.1.8 Movement in a Column
164(2)
6.1.9 Integrating Different Movement Solutions
166(1)
6.2 Physical Matter Delivery and Remote Processing
167(4)
6.2.1 Most General Task Solution
167(1)
6.2.2 Splitting into Subtasks
167(1)
6.2.3 Adding Synchronization
168(1)
6.2.4 Setting Specific Routes
169(1)
6.2.5 Assigning Robots to Scenarios in Column Movement
169(2)
6.3 Physical World Search Assisted by Virtual World
171(10)
6.3.1 Creating the Distributed Virtual World
172(2)
6.3.2 Top-Level Space-Cleaning Scenarios
174(1)
6.3.3 Single-Step Multiple-Branch Search
175(3)
6.3.4 Full-Depth Search for Polygons
178(1)
6.3.5 Run Time Space Modification
179(2)
6.4 Map-Based Collection of Samples
181(1)
6.5 Conclusions
182(3)
7 DISTRIBUTED MANAGEMENT USING DYNAMIC INFRASTRUCTURES 185(22)
7.1 Distributed Creation and Reconfiguration of an Infrastructure
186(6)
7.1.1 Hierarchical Infrastructure
186(1)
7.1.2 Other Topologies: Centralized, Chain, and Ring
187(3)
7.1.3 Infrastructure Modification
190(2)
7.2 Dynamic Hierarchy Based on Physical Neighborhood
192(3)
7.2.1 Finding the Most Central Unit
192(1)
7.2.2 Creating Infrastructure from the Center
193(2)
7.3 Basic Command-and-Control Scenario in WAVE-WP
195(3)
7.3.1 Recursive Hierarchical Command and Control (CC)
195(1)
7.3.2 Implementing CC in WAVE-WP
196(1)
7.3.3 Adding Payload to the CC Implementation
197(1)
7.4 Solving Distributed Management Problems
198(3)
7.4.1 Hierarchical Resource Management
198(1)
7.4.2 More Complex Management Scenarios
199(2)
7.5 Air Traffic Management in Dynamic Environments
201(5)
7.5.1 Creation of the Radar Neighborhood Infrastructure
201(1)
7.5.2 Mobile Tracking of an Aerial Object
202(1)
7.5.3 Simultaneous Multiple Tracking
203(1)
7.5.4 Setting Up Global Control
204(1)
7.5.5 Other Traffic Management Tasks
205(1)
7.6 Conclusions
206(1)
8 MORE CRISIS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS AND SYSTEMS 207(26)
8.1 Region Patrol by Mobile Robots
208(5)
8.1.1 Patrolling by a Single Robot
208(1)
8.1.2 Simultaneous Region Patrol by Two Robots
209(1)
8.1.3 Possible Cooperation Between the Two Robots
210(1)
8.1.4 Dynamic Patrol by Any Number of Robots
211(2)
8.2 Distributed Dynamic Cognitive Systems
213(2)
8.2.1 Semantic Representation of Distributed Cognition
213(1)
8.2.2 Multirobot Patrol as a Distributed Cognitive System
214(1)
8.3 Multirobot Hospital Scenarios
215(5)
8.3.1 A Robotized Hospital
215(1)
8.3.2 Hospital World Representation
216(1)
8.3.3 State-Checking Scenario
217(1)
8.3.4 Cleaning Scenario
218(1)
8.3.5 Life Support Scenario
219(1)
8.3.6 Multirobot Service Snapshot
219(1)
8.4 Future Combat Systems
220(3)
8.4.1 Advantages of Using WAVE-WP
220(1)
8.4.2 Target Fusion and Distribution by the Infrastructure
221(1)
8.4.3 Fusion-Distribution Scenario in WAVE-WP
222(1)
8.5 Crises Management in Open Networks
223(6)
8.5.1 Embedding Distributed WAVE-WP System
223(1)
8.5.2 Establishing Higher Management Layer
224(1)
8.5.3 Collecting All Infected Nodes
225(1)
8.5.4 Finding Congested Links and Nodes
226(1)
8.5.5 Inferring Possible Virus Sources
227(1)
8.5.6 More Intelligent Solutions Required
228(1)
8.6 Using Global Infrastructures in WAVE-WP
229(2)
8.6.1 Hypothetical Infrastructure Sketch
229(1)
8.6.2 Air Defense Programming Example
229(2)
8.7 Conclusions
231(2)
9 CONCLUSIONS 233(8)
9.1 Summary of the Main Features of WAVE-WP
233(2)
9.1.1 Starting from the Whole
233(1)
9.1.2 The WAVE-WP Automaton
234(1)
9.1.3 High-Level WAVE-WP Language
234(1)
9.1.4 Distributed WAVE-WP Interpreter
234(1)
9.2 Some Main Application Areas
235(3)
9.2.1 Directly Accessing Physical World
235(1)
9.2.2 Distributed Knowledge Processing
235(1)
9.2.3 Operating in Physical World Under the Guidance of Virtual World
235(1)
9.2.4 Intelligent Network Management
236(1)
9.2.5 Advanced Crisis Reaction Forces
236(1)
9.2.6 Massive Cooperative Robotics
236(1)
9.2.7 Distributed Road and Air Traffic Management
237(1)
9.2.8 Autonomous Distributed Cognitive Systems
237(1)
9.2.9 Distributed Interactive Simulation
237(1)
9.2.10 Global Defense and Security
238(1)
9.3 Final Remarks
238(1)
9.3.1 After the Final Remarks
239(1)
9.4 Future Plans
239(2)
APPENDIX: WAVE-WP SUMMARY 241(4)
A.1 Extended Language Syntax
241(2)
A.2 Compact Syntax Description
243(1)
A.3 Permitted Abbreviations
243(2)
References 245(4)
Index 249

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